Events

Mar 6
Feasting and Fasting: Foodways in Politics, Religion, and Social Life on the Swahili Coast (Tanzania) since 700 CEnoon

African Studies Lecture Series Dr. Sarah Walshaw (History, Simon Fraser University) "Feasting and Fasting: Foodways in Politics, Religion, and Social Life on the Swahili Coast...
March 6 noon–1:15 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

African Studies Lecture Series

Dr. Sarah Walshaw (History, Simon Fraser University) "Feasting and Fasting: Foodways in Politics, Religion, and Social Life on the Swahili Coast (Tanzania) since 700 CE"



The African Studies Program encourages teaching and scholarship on sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the wider African diaspora. The program offers a minor, develops courses related to Africa, promotes study-abroad programs and internships, raises funds to expand African Studies resources, and organizes campus and local community events pertaining to Africa. In addition, the program supports faculty and student research on Africa and facilitates dissemination of research through the African Studies Lecture Series, for faculty and guest presentations, and the Acacia Seminars, for presentations of student research and experiences.

http://africa.uoregon.edu/



Generous Support from: Oregon Humanities Center, Office of International Affairs, Division of Equity and Inclusion,
Clark Honors College, School of Journalism, Food Studies, Gabon-Oregon Center, Departments of Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Folklore, History, English, Philosophy, Comparative Literature, International Studies, General Social Sciences.

Apr 19
Squatting, Space and Power in Alexandra's 1946 Squatters' Movementnoon

African Studies Lecture Series Dr. Dawne Y. Curry (History & Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska at Lincoln) "Squatting, Space and Power in Alexandra's 1946 Squatters'...
April 19 noon–1:15 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

African Studies Lecture Series

Dr. Dawne Y. Curry (History & Ethnic Studies, University of Nebraska at Lincoln) "Squatting, Space and Power in Alexandra's 1946 Squatters' Movement"



The African Studies Program encourages teaching and scholarship on sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the wider African diaspora. The program offers a minor, develops courses related to Africa, promotes study-abroad programs and internships, raises funds to expand African Studies resources, and organizes campus and local community events pertaining to Africa. In addition, the program supports faculty and student research on Africa and facilitates dissemination of research through the African Studies Lecture Series, for faculty and guest presentations, and the Acacia Seminars, for presentations of student research and experiences.

http://africa.uoregon.edu/



Generous Support from: Oregon Humanities Center, Office of International Affairs, Division of Equity and Inclusion,
Clark Honors College, School of Journalism, Food Studies, Gabon-Oregon Center, Departments of Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Folklore, History, English, Philosophy, Comparative Literature, International Studies, General Social Sciences.

Apr 19
Oregon Rare Books Initiative - An Entirely Reasonable Madness: The Crash of 1720 and the Great Mirror of Folly4:45 p.m.

Catherine Labio - Associate Professor of English, University of Colorado at Boulder 1720 was the year of the first international stock market crash. In Paris the value of shares...
April 19 4:45 p.m.–5:45 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

Catherine Labio - Associate Professor of English, University of Colorado at Boulder

1720 was the year of the first international stock market crash. In Paris the value of shares in John Law's Compagnie des Indes (aka the Mississippi Company) collapsed in the spring. In London the South Sea Bubble burst in the summer. Investors flocked to the Dutch Republic instead. On October 6, 1720, following a riot, the magistrates of Amsterdam forbade further trading in new companies. Within weeks an anonymous consortium of Dutch publishers published the first version of Het Groote Tafereel der Dwaasheid (The Great Mirror of Folly), a compilation of the many texts and images that had been published the previous months on the subject of the windhandel, or trade in wind, code for worthless shares. The highly successful publication helped crystallize the belief that the events of 1720 had been driven by irrational beliefs and behaviors. Economic historians have tried to dispel that myth, but fiction has long trumped fact, in part because of the success and ongoing fame of the Tafereel. What is certain is that the publishers of The Great Mirror of Folly behaved very rationally and profitably when they created this monument to financial folly. In the process, they also enshrined some of the metaphors and images that have been used for almost three hundred years to make sense of stock market crashes.

May 11
Everyday Nation Building: Creativity, Culture and Community in Senegal and Indonesianoon

African Studies Lecture Series Dr. Dennis Galvan (Political Science & International Studies, UO) "Everyday Nation Building: Creativity, Culture and Community in Senegal and...
May 11 noon–1:15 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

African Studies Lecture Series

Dr. Dennis Galvan (Political Science & International Studies, UO) "Everyday Nation Building: Creativity, Culture and Community in Senegal and Indonesia"



The African Studies Program encourages teaching and scholarship on sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the wider African diaspora. The program offers a minor, develops courses related to Africa, promotes study-abroad programs and internships, raises funds to expand African Studies resources, and organizes campus and local community events pertaining to Africa. In addition, the program supports faculty and student research on Africa and facilitates dissemination of research through the African Studies Lecture Series, for faculty and guest presentations, and the Acacia Seminars, for presentations of student research and experiences.

http://africa.uoregon.edu/



Generous Support from: Oregon Humanities Center, Office of International Affairs, Division of Equity and Inclusion,
Clark Honors College, School of Journalism, Food Studies, Gabon-Oregon Center, Departments of Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Folklore, History, English, Philosophy, Comparative Literature, International Studies, General Social Sciences.

May 23
The Impact of the Construction of the Sierra Leone Railway on African Lives in the Early 20th Centurynoon

African Studies Lecture Series Dr. Trina Hogg (History, Philosophy, & Religion, Oregon State University) "A Pioneer of Civilization?: The Impact of the Construction of the Sierra...
May 23 noon–1:15 p.m.
Knight Library, Browsing Room

African Studies Lecture Series

Dr. Trina Hogg (History, Philosophy, & Religion, Oregon State University) "A Pioneer of Civilization?: The Impact of the Construction of the Sierra Leone Railway on African Lives in the Early 20th Century"



The African Studies Program encourages teaching and scholarship on sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, and the wider African diaspora. The program offers a minor, develops courses related to Africa, promotes study-abroad programs and internships, raises funds to expand African Studies resources, and organizes campus and local community events pertaining to Africa. In addition, the program supports faculty and student research on Africa and facilitates dissemination of research through the African Studies Lecture Series, for faculty and guest presentations, and the Acacia Seminars, for presentations of student research and experiences.

http://africa.uoregon.edu/



Generous Support from: Oregon Humanities Center, Office of International Affairs, Division of Equity and Inclusion,
Clark Honors College, School of Journalism, Food Studies, Gabon-Oregon Center, Departments of Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Folklore, History, English, Philosophy, Comparative Literature, International Studies, General Social Sciences.