Fall 2020 Course Descriptions

HC 101H: Top Visions of Conflict

Professor: Michael Moffitt

4.00 credits

• CRN 16603: Monday & Wednesday, 0815 - 0945 @ ALL 101

• CRN 16611: Monday & Wednesday, 1215 1345 @ ALL 101

This class examines visions of human conflict. We will engage a range of intellectual lenses to understand the breadth of efforts to describe conflicts in a wide range of settings - - wars between nations, clashes between roommates, disagreements over public resources and policies, or differences within families or organizations, for example. Read More


HC 101H: Epic Leadership and Lyric Poetry

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 16604: Monday & Wednesday, 0815-0945 @ ALL 140

What do Lincoln, Churchill, JFK, Wangari Matthai, Sojourner Truth, Eleanor Roosevelt, Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King, Victor Havel, Pablo Neruda, and Barack Obama have in common? An unlikely story: poetry. Read More


HC 101H: Philosophy of Food

Professor: Hannah Cutting-Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 16606: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ ALL 101

• CRN 18202: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ This course will be held remotely

“Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.” – Jean Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826).

Read more


HC 101H: Evolution in Science and Society

Professor: Samantha Hopkins

4.00 credits

• CRN 16607: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ ALL 140

This class examines the critical idea of evolution by natural selection, its development as a scientific concept, its application and misapplication to a variety of other fields. Read More


HC 101H: The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Professor: Tobin Hansen

4.00 credits

• CRN 16608: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ LLCN 125

What is a border? This course examines the U.S.-Mexico borderlands region and the historical legacies of its peoples, cultures, and politics Read more


HC 101H: Drama in Ancient Greece and Medieval Japan

Professor: Corinne Bayerl

4.00 credits

• CRN 16609: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ ALL 140

• CRN 16613: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ ALL 140

This seminar will explore the relationship between drama in comic and tragic modes in two different cultures: 5th-and 4th-century B.C. Athens and 14th-century Japan. Read More


HC 101H: Malaria-Science, Ethics, History

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

4.00 credits

• CRN 16610: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ LLCN 125

This course examines malaria and its corresponding technologies in Africa from many different disciplines and perspectives, recognizing how these different approaches contribute to more complex and accurate understanding of a challenging disease. Read More


HC 101H: The Chemistry and Poetry of Change

Professor: Rachel Rodman

Credits: 4.00

• CRN 16612: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ LLCN 125

Change is central to life. Cells divide. Organisms grow and die. We take molecules from sources as diverse as goat cheese and blackberries (plants, in parallel, pluck them from the air) and we use them to build our own bodies. Read More

HC 101H: Expanding the Archive: Piecing Fragments and Listening to Silences

Professor: Monique Balbuena

4.00 credits

• CRN 16614: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ This course will be held remotely

• CRN 16621: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

The “archive” roughly refers to our records of the past. How are our memories recorded and included in the archive? How is history recorded and remembered? Which voices are registered in the archive, and which forgotten? What is preserved and what is discarded? How can we add to the archive and inscribe those about whom no words were written? Read more.


HC 101H: Artificial Intelligence: The Culture of Minds and Machines

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 16616: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ ALL 101

• CRN 16618: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ ALL 101

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?  Philip K. Dick’s titular question frames the concerns of this course on the relationship between minds and machines. Read more


HC 101H: John Muir's Backpack

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 16619: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ LIL 255

Scientist or poet? John Muir’s death certificate lists his occupation as Geologist. He was known worldwide as a botanist. He stands in the California quarter as a mountaineer. He is legendary in first ascents lore. First president of the Sierra Club, he is credited as grandfather of the national parks who wrote the Game Book on environmental advocacy. Read More


HC 101H: Threats to Ethics

Professor: Caroline Lundquist

Credits: 4.00

• CRN 18184: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ This course will be held remotely

• CRN 18185: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

Everyone knows what it is like to face a moral dilemma. In situations where some of our values conflict with others, it can be incredibly challenging to know what we should do. Read More

HC 101H: Voyages of Exploration

Professor: Carol Paty

• CRN 16617: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ ALL 140

What does it mean to explore? For some exploring conjures images of sailing across vast oceans, or overland expeditions to map uncharted territories, or astronauts traversing the surface of the Moon. For others exploration is a pathway to discovery and understanding, with detailed analysis, research, investigation, contemplation, and experimentation comprising the tools of trade. Read more.


HC 101H: The Pencil

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 16620: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ ALL 140

If you pay attention to such things, you’ll have noticed that the pencil has been having a comeback. In 2010, the iconic Blackwing 602 Pencil, manufactured by the Eberhard Faber Pencil Company from the 1930s, was reintroduced. Read more


HC 221H: Writing the Journey: Studying and Practicing Travel Writing

Professor: Liz Bohls

4.00 credits

• CRN 13078: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ ALL 101

Since remote antiquity, for a wide variety of reasons, people have left home and hit the road. Journeys have always been a part of life, and travel writing has a long and varied history as a literary genre. Read More


HC 221H: In Search of Belonging: The Consolations of Community in Contemporary Literature and Cinema

Professor: Dawn Marlan

4.00 credits

• CRN 13079: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ This course will be held remotely

This is a course focused on the paradox of community, namely that the very safety and protection it offers (by virtue of strength in numbers, for example) poses a danger to the individual, whose freedom it curtails and whose interests are never perfectly aligned with those of the group. Read More


 

HC 221H: True Fictions

Professor: Brendan O'Kelly

4.00 credits

• CRN 13080: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ ANS 195

Ever since The Blair Witch Project (1999) was marketed as “found footage” documenting the last few days of missing—and presumably dead—film students, the horror genre has been barraged by films pretending to be discovered footage of actual events. Read More


HC 221H: The Difference China Makes

Professor: Roy Chan

• CRN 13085: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ MCK 122

In recent months fears over the global spread of the coronavirus COVID-19 have evolved into widespread stigmatization and stereotyping of Chinese people and culture. Read More


HC 221H: Beyond Nietzsche and Nazis: An Intellectual History of the Alt-Right

Professor: Rebecca Schuman

4.00 credits

• CRN 13087: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ This course will be held remotely

While contemporary “alt-right” movements have much in common with the dogma of the Nazism, we know only a fraction of the story if we don’t also study the numerous other blueprints for these intersecting ideologies, blueprints that appeared with astounding regularity in the cultural output of post-Enlightenment Europe. Read More


HC 221H: Sex and the City: Intimacy and the Urban Milieu in European Literature and Thought

Professor: Rebecca Schuman

4.00 credits

• CRN 13090: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ This course will be held remotely

How do humanity’s closest relationships — with sexual partners, neighbors, members of one’s own community or even with individuals one marginalizes — shape, provoke or challenge the concept of the self and of “culture”? Read More


HC 231H: Mental Illness in Ancient Cultures

Professor: Shoshana Kerewsky

4.00 credits

• CRN 13098: Tuesday & Thursday, 0815-0945 @ This course will be held remotely

This course explores a range of pre-modern civilizations’ descriptions of mental health and mental illness...Read More


HC 231H: The Fundamentals of Economics

Professor: Glen Waddell

4.00 credits

• CRN 13099: Tuesday & Thursday, 0815-0945 @ ALL 140

The theory of economics does not furnish a body of settled conclusions immediately applicable to policy. It is a method rather than a doctrine, an apparatus of the mind, a technique of thinking which helps its possessor to draw correct conclusions." – Keynes. Read More


HC 231H: Housing and Homelessness

Professor: Claire Herbert

4.00 credits

• CRN 13100: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

This course examines how housing shapes individual, family, and neighborhood dynamics. Read More


HC 231H: Household Archaeology

Professor: Alison Carter

4.00 credits

• CRN 13101: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ LLCN 125

When people think of archaeology and the ancient world they often think of dramatic monuments like the Great Pyramids in Egypt, Emperor Qin Shi Huang’s tomb of terracotta warriors in China, or religious sites like Stonehenge in England. Read More


HC 231H: Introduction to International Relations

Professor: Jane Cramer

4.00 credits

• CRN 13102: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ LIL 232

This section of HC 231H is equivalent to PS 205 Introduction to International Relations, and therefore, not recommended for students who have already taken PS 205

For Political Science (PS) Majors, this course will count toward the 200-level course requirement and will serve as a gateway class for the Global Engagement Career Path. For PS Minors, this course will count toward the minimum credit requirement. 

From the Trojan and Peloponnesian Wars in ancient Greece through the wars among Native American tribes to recent conflicts in Iraq and Bosnia, nations have gone to war. The question is why? Read More


HC 231H: In and Out of the Museum

Professor: Eleanora Redaelli

4.00 credits

• CRN 13103: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ MCK 122

This course explores the multifaceted aspects of an art museum, focusing on a case study: the Portland Art Museum (PAM). Read More


HC 231H: Facing Climate Change: Inequality and Action

Professor: Leigh Johnson

4.00 credits

• CRN 13104: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ ED 276

This course orients students to the challenges climate change poses for human wellbeing and socioeconomic development in both the Global North and South. Read More


HC 231H: Oral Advocacy and Argumentation

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

• CRN 13105: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ This course will be held remotely

• CRN 13109: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

Rhetoric and argument have been the foundation of a liberal education for more than 2000 years. Read More


HC 231H: Peace Making in the Middle East

Professor: Farhad Malekafzali

4.00 credits

• CRN 13106: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ MCK 122

This course takes a critical look at the causes and consequences of continuing conflict in the Middle East with an emphasis on conflict resolution and long-term peace building using two specific cases, Israel-Palestine and Iran-United States. Read More


HC 231H: Global Food Security

Professor: Galen Martin

4.00 credits

• CRN 13107: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ ALL 140

A fundamental challenge for humans has always been the procurement of food. The human historical human experience has been marked by periodic localized and regional famine. Read More


HC 231H: Schools and Society

Professor: Edward Olivos

4.00 credits

• CRN 13108: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ LIL 112

Students in this course will examine conflicting perspectives and beliefs about public education within the context of increased racial/ethnic and social diversity in schools. Read More


HC 231H: Deportation from the United States

Professor: Tobin Hansen

4.00 credits

CRN 17818: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ MCK 214

This course explores deportation from the United States in historical and contemporary social and political context. Our examination of the logics of and mechanisms for expelling “undesirable” populations will provide an entrée into three central inquiries: Who belongs? How is belonging regulated? And, what are the consequences of expulsion? Read More


HC 241H (formerly 207H/209H): Statistical Reasoning: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Professor: David Levin

4.00 credits

• CRN 16590: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 0800-0900 @ MCK 122

Note:  HC 241H Science courses are equivalent to HC 207H and 209H Science courses in the pre-Fall 2020 curriculum requirements and will fulfill the HC207H / HC209H requirement.  If you have already completed HC 207H or 209H, you do not need to take HC 241H in the Fall 2020 curriculum requirements.

Over the past twenty years, the explosion of computing power, coupled with the growth of networked communication and information systems, has allowed for the unprecedented collection of many types of information. Moreover, it is now possible to process this data in inexhaustibly many ways. Read more


HC 241H (formerly 207H/209H): Angels, Monsters and Machine Learning

Professor: Stephan Fickas

4.00 credits

• CRN 16591: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ This course will be held remotely

Note:  HC 241H Science courses are equivalent to HC 207H and 209H Science courses in the pre-Fall 2020 curriculum requirements and will fulfill the HC207H / HC209H requirement.  If you have already completed HC 207H or 209H, you do not need to take HC 241H in the Fall 2020 curriculum requirements.

We will look at how we can use data to find the angels and monsters in our midst. We will use a data-analysis tool called machine learning. Read More


HC 241H (formerly 207H/209H): Unusual Oceanographic Events

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 16886: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ MCK 122

Note: HC 241H Science courses are equivalent to HC 207H and 209H Science courses in the pre-Fall 2020 curriculum requirements and will fulfill the HC207H / HC209H requirement.  If you have already completed HC 207H or 209H, you do not need to take HC 241H in the Fall 2020 curriculum requirements.

In order to understand what is unusual, one must first understand what is “usual”. This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of oceanography and data analysis via exploration of online data sets, readings from scientific literature, short programming assignments, and other activities. Read more


HC 241H (formerly 207H/209H): Decision Making for Sustainability

Professor: Kenneth Doxsee

4.00 credits

• CRN 16887: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

Note:  HC 241H Science courses are equivalent to HC 207H and 209H Science courses in the pre-Fall 2020 curriculum requirements and will fulfill the HC207H / HC209H requirement.  If you have already completed HC 207H or 209H, you do not need to take HC 241H in the Fall 2020 curriculum requirements.

Through a series of readings, guided discussions, and analyses of case studies, this course will provide students with the broad scientific and behavioral knowledge needed to make informed decisions and engage in thoughtful discourse about various contemporary issues in the realm of sustainability. Read More


HC 241H (formerly 207H/209H): Alchemy of the Air: Nitrogen as Global Savior and Scourge

Professor: Matthew Polizzotto

4.00 credits

• CRN 16888: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ GSH 132

Note:  HC 241H Science courses are equivalent to HC 207H and 209H Science courses in the pre-Fall 2020 curriculum requirements and will fulfill the HC207H / HC209H requirement.  If you have already completed HC 207H or 209H, you do not need to take HC 241H in the Fall 2020 curriculum requirements.

Figuring out how to harness usable nitrogen from air was one of the most important innovations in human history. Read More


HC 241H (formerly 207H/209H): Honors Foundations of Physics I

Professor: Ben McMorran

4.00 credits

• CRN 16889: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ ESL 112

This section of HC 241H is equivalent to PHYS 201/PHYS 251. The course will fulfill PHYS 201 requirements for all UO majors and minors. For PHYS majors and minors who receive a B or higher in the class, the course will fulfill PHYS 251 requirements. 

Note:  HC 241H Science courses are equivalent to HC 207H and 209H Science courses in the pre-Fall 2020 curriculum requirements and will fulfill the HC207H / HC209H requirement.  If you have already completed HC 207H or 209H, you do not need to take HC 241H in the Fall 2020 curriculum requirements.

In this course, we will discuss and practice introductory physics about the role of symmetry in nature and the consequence it has for conserved quantities like momentum and energy. Read More


HC 277H: Thesis Orientation - Frank

Professor: David Frank

2.00 credits

• CRN 16623: Monday, 1615-1745 @ This course will be held remotely

• CRN 16626: Tuesday, 1015-1145 @ This course will be held remotely

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. Read more


HC 277H: Thesis Orientation - Baldwin

Professor: Dare Baldwin

2.00 credits

• CRN 16625: Tuesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

• CRN 16629: Thursday, 1015-1145 @ This course will be held remotely

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. Read more


HC 277H: Thesis Orientation - Gallagher

Professor: Daphne Gallagher

2.00 credits

• CRN 16628: Thursday, 1015-1145 @ LIL 232

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. Read more


HC 421H: Cinema Manifestos

Professor: Peter Alilunas

4.00 credits

• CRN 13118: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

This course traces in detail the various manifestos from the global history of cinema, positioning them within historical, aesthetic, political, and theoretical contexts. Read More


HC 421H : Lie to Me: Techniques in Prose Fiction

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

4.00 credits

• CRN 13119: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ This course will be held remotely

The goals of this course are deceptively simple: to refine your understanding of the rudiments and mechanics of fiction writing, and to foster the development of habits vital to the future production of solid, expressive prose (which includes but is not limited to literary prose), beyond the confines of this course.  Read More


HC 431H: Big Problems and Bold Solutions: A Collaborative Approach to Problem Solving and Developing Leadership Skills

Professor: James Shephard

4.00 credits

• CRN 13122: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ LIL 232

Whatever career you embark on, whatever path you follow, you will find success if you are an effective problem solver and leader. This course will give you an opportunity to develop problem solving and leadership skills in a collaborative environment. Read More


HC 431H: The Language of Truth

Professor: Eric Pederson

4.00 credits

• CRN 13125: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ LIL 245

How do know when someone is telling the truth? How do we indicate when we are or are not telling the truth? How do languages vary in their expression of truth statements? These questions have always been relevant to the human condition. Read More


HC 431H: The Taste of Power: Food and Colonialism in World History

Professor: Hannah Cutting-Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 18227: Wednesday, 1415-1700 @ This course will be held remotely

In this class we will explore the relationship between food and colonialism from South Asia to the Americas. Read more

HC 434H/421H: Art & Politics from Michelangelo to YouTube

Professor: Jamie Harper

4.00 credits

• CRN 17078: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ ALL 101

This course considers the interrelationship of art and politics over the centuries, spanning from about 1500 to the present. Read More


HC 434H/431H: African Military History, 1960s-2000s

Professor: A.B. Assensoh

4.00 credits

• CRN 13126: Monday, 1400-1650 @ This course will be held remotely

In African political History, a nation on the second largest continent (Africa) was often considered both stable and progressive if there had not been a military intervention – i.e. coup d’etat -- in its national politics. Read More


HC 441H : Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Neuroscience Journalism

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic

4.00 credits

• CRN 13128: Thursday, 1415-1715 @ This course will be held remotely

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. These seminars will have a collaborative format, with students writing frequently and rewriting their work in response to comments by their professors and input from classmates. You have learned how to write for college, now learn how to write for life.

The human brain has been called the most complex object in the known universe.  It is also, arguably, one of the most fascinating.  Over the past several decades, neuroscience research has  Read More


 

HC 441H: Cosmology

Professor: James Schombert

4.00 credits

• CRN 13129: Tuesday & Thursday, 0815-0945 @ ALL 101

Cosmology, the study of the formation and evolution of the Universe, has progressed from its origins in early man’s ideas of Nature, to Chinese and Greek world views, to Dante’s vision of Heaven and Hell, to Newton’s Clockwork Universe. Read More


HC 441H : The Mystique of Marine Mammals in History, Science and Culture

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 13130: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ LIL 245

Marine mammals (whales, dolphins, seals, and others) occupy a special place in the human psyche. Read more


HC 441H: Geology and Biology of the Tibetan Plateau

Professor: Samantha Hopkins

4.00 credits

• CRN 17928: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ ALL 140

Central Asia is home to the highest mountains in the world, and the elevation and relief of the Tibetan Plateau is unequalled anywhere else on Earth. Its impact on global climate traces back perhaps 65 million years, and continues through the present day. Read More


HC 444H/431H: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Nothing About Us Without Us – Writing About Disability

Professor: Judith Raiskin

4.00 credits

• CRN 17005: Thursday, 0900-1145 @ This course will be held remotely

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts educationRead More


HC 444H/421H: The Hunger Games and Social Philosophy

Professor: Camisha Russell

4.00 credits

• CRN 17077: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ GSH 123

The popular Hunger Games trilogy consists of three novels marketed to young adults (but enjoyed more broadly) – The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay. Read more


HC 477H : Thesis Prospectus - Frank

Professor: David Frank

2.00 credits

• CRN 13131: Monday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

• CRN 13132: Tuesday, 1215-1345 @ This course will be held remotely

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more


HC 477H : Thesis Prospectus - Graboyes

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

2.00 credits

• CRN 13133: Friday, 0815-0945 @ CON 260

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more


HC 477H : Thesis Prospectus - Carey

Professor: Mark Carey

2.00 credits

• CRN 13134: Wednesday, 1400-1545 @ CHA 201

• CRN 13136: Thursday, 1415-1545 @ CHA 201

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more