Spring 2019 Course Descriptions

Spring 2019 HC 207H: Plants and Society

Professor: Tobias Policha

4.00 credits

• CRN 32507: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 301

Plants influence every aspect of our lives whether we realize it or not. They provide the basis of our food-webs, they provide the oxygen that we breathe and they provide many of the materials that we build with and the fibers that we clothe ourselves with. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 209H: The Biological Basis of Human Behavior

Professor: Klaree Boose

4.00 credits

• CRN 32510: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 202

Human behavior is complex and multifaceted. Understanding the underlying motivations and actions of humans is relevant to a wide range of disciplines, from health and biology to economics and communications. This course will provide students with an understanding of human behavior from an evolutionary perspective using topics drawn from the fields of ecology, sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 209H: Science of Human Infancy

Professor: Dare Baldwin

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32509: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

Human infancy is a remarkable period in each of our lives that, oddly, we’re unable to remember. The human infant is a fascinating combination of helplessness and powerful potential, of preprogrammed responses and resilient plasticity. For parents, the advent of a newborn can bring untold joy while wreaking havoc on daily routines and healthy sleep schedules. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 223H: Reading Spaces

Professor: Kimberley Parzuchowski

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32516: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301

The world of research is engaging when you pursue your passions.  Research methods are a means toward empowering your potential to learn what interests you and make your voice heard so that you can influence the changes you want to see in the world. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 223H: Climate Change and the Problem of Representation

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 32511: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201

What are the representational demands of climate change and environmental catastrophe on literature and artistic production? In this course we will consider both the limits and possibilities of literary and other cultural forms to respond to the burgeoning reality of climate change. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 223H: All too Human: Existentialist Literature

Professor: Caroline Lundquist

4.00 credits

• CRN 32512: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201
• CRN 32513: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201

As Blaise Pascal once wrote, “Man is but a reed…but he is a thinking reed.” Following Pascal, we might broadly define human beings as the natural beings who feel compelled to think about their own existence. One consequence of this innately human drive to think is the impulse to search for meaning in our existence. But, as Albert Camus pointed out, there is no “why” in nature; meaning does not grow on trees. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 223H: Artificial Births in Speculative Fiction from Frankenstein to the Present

Professor: Elizabeth Raisanen

4.00 credits

• CRN 32514: Wednesday & Friday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202

Ever since the 1818 publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, artificial births have been a recurring plot point in many works of speculative fiction. Heralded by many as the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein explores a world in which new life is artificially created by a technological rather than a natural process, a theme that subsequent authors have engaged with in order to call into question the very categories of the “natural” and the “artificial” when it comes to reproduction. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 223H: Philosophy of Science Fiction in Film

Professor: Steven Brence

4.00 credits

CRN 32515: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:50 @ CHA 301

What is it to be a human being? Does technology enhance humanity (us, that which makes us human, or both) or threaten it? Could technology become human, combine with it, or even replace it? What do current or emerging trends, if extended into the future, mean? Are we on a path to transformation? Extinction? Read more


Spring 2019 HC 233H: American Prisons

Professor: Tim Williams

4.00 credits

• CRN 32517: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201

In this course students will learn and develop basic research skills as they write an original research paper in the discipline of history. The course is structured in a way that leads students along the typical research trail while simultaneously discussing approaches to research related to the course theme. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 233H: Comparative History: A Dialogic Approach to Historical Research

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

4.00 credits

• CRN 32520: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202
• CRN 32518: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202

This third course in the honors college history sequence offers you an opportunity to conduct original historical research on a topic of your choice. The only restriction is that you employ a comparative approach to your subject. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 233H: History of U.S. Reproductive Politics

Professor: Jamie Bufalino

4.00 credits

• CRN 32519: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 301

The purpose of this class is to examine the history of U.S. law and social policy as well as individual attitudes and decision-making concerning human reproduction.  Our analysis will address the impact of changing attitudes toward gender, race, ethnicity, class, science, religion, sexuality, & sexual orientation on reproductive politics in U.S. history. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 233H: The American City

Professor: Ocean Howell

4.00 credits

• CRN 32521: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202

In the postbellum (post-Civil War) era, the cities of the United States provided the world with a number of firsts, including the first skyscraper and the first settlement to reach a population of 10 million.  At various points, American cities have been the largest, the tallest, the densest, and the wealthiest on the planet. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 399H: Critical Argumentation and Scholarship

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32523: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ GSH 130

This course prepares students to better form, present, critique and defend arguments before academic audiences. Students finishing the course understand and apply elements that influence the effectiveness of arguments delivered orally in academic contexts through a combination of lectures, readings, and intensive practice, preparation, and faculty and peer feedback. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

1.00-12.00 credits

•  CRN 32528: Saturday 4/13, 11:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 201

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: Ocean Howell

1.00-12.00 credits

•  CRN 32529: Thursday 4/18, 17:00 - 21:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

1.00-12.00 credits

•  CRN 32530: Saturday 4/20, 11:00 - 15:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

1.00-12.00 credits

•  CRN 32531: Saturday 4/27, 11:00 - 15:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Spring 2019 Inside-Out Exchange HC 421H: Ethics and Literature: Tolstoy's Anna Karenina

Professor: Steven Shankman

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32533: Tuesday, 18:00 - 20:50 @ OSCI Salem (Monday 4/1 only, 18:00 - 20:20 @ CHA 201)

We will carefully read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, paying special attention to what the novel has to say about ethics understood in Levinas’s sense: my inescapable responsibility for a unique and irreplaceable other. We will read Ethics and Infinity, a reasonably accessible and brief series of interviews with Levinas, and we will look for connections between Tolstoy’s fiction and Levinas’s thought. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 421H: The Hunger Games and Social Philosophy

Professor: Camisha Russell

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32535: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CON 301

The popular Hunger Games trilogy consists of three novels marketed to young adults (but enjoyed more broadly) – The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay. The stories take place in a dystopian future North America (Panem) which, following a series of environmental disasters, has been divided into a Capitol and 12 (13) Districts. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 424H/421H: Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood Films: Deconstructing and Resisting Orientalist Images

Professor: Irum Shiekh

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32536: Tuesday, 14:00 - 16:50 @ GSH 117

This class uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the depictions of Arabs and Muslims in Hollywood films.  Combining film theory with historical analysis, we begin the class by exploring the role of the Hollywood industry in consciously and unconsciously shaping and influencing our understanding of the Arabs and Muslims living locally and globally. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 424H/431H: Civil War Narratives

Professor: Tim Williams

4.00 credits

•  CRN 36224: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 301

The Civil War is the most studied event in the history of the United States. Often described as the American Iliad, the Civil War appears in popular memory as both a war of devastating carnage and as a watershed in the long freedom struggle for African Americans. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 424H/431H: Development of Language Attitudes: The Origins of Linguistic Discrimination

Professor: Charlotte Vaughn

4.00 credits

•  CRN 36254: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ ANS 193

Most adults have beliefs about the languages and accents they think sound smart and sophisticated, and which sound uneducated. But, how did they come to have those beliefs? This course will examine how children come to hold attitudes about languages and dialects, attitudes which can have real consequences for speakers of marginalized and minority language varieties. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 431H: In and Out the Museum

Professor: Eleonora Redaelli

4.00 credits

•  CRN 36236: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202

This course explores the multifaceted aspects of an art museum, focusing on a case study: the Portland Art Museum (PAM). Read more


Spring 2019 HC 431H: The Biological Basis of Coalitions, Alliances, and Political Systems

Professor: Klaree Boose

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32538: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202

Human sociality is complex and our proclivity to form coalitions and alliances has a long evolutionary history. Understanding the biological basis of human political behavior is relevant to a wide range of disciplines including business, marketing, economics, and political science. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 431H: The Jewish Encounter with Modernity (JDST 213)

Professor: Monique Rodrigues Balbuena

4.00 credits

•  CRN 33036: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ GSH 130

From the Spanish Expulsion in 1492 to legal Emancipation in 1791, Jewish culture, society and politics underwent significant changes. Jews faced unprecedent challenges with the advent of Modernity. In their complex transition from Medievalism to Modernity, Jews had to redefine what it means “to be Jewish” in virtually every aspect of life, from politics and religion, to art and music. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 434H/421H: African-American Writers in Paris

Professor: Corinne Bayerl

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32539: Friday, 09:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 301

This class will focus on the vibrant African-American community that settled in Paris after WWI and included writers and intellectuals such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, and Richard Wright. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 441H: Soils, Environmental Quality and Global Challenges

Professor: Matthew Polizzotto

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32541: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 301

As the world population grows toward 10 billion people by 2050, we will be pressed to increase food security, respond to the consequences of a changing climate, and improve human health – all while protecting the environment and maintaining natural resources. Soils play a critical role in many of these challenges, particularly in regulating environmental quality. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 441H: Cosmology

Professor: James Schombert

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32542: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 301

Cosmology, the study of the formation and evolution of the Universe, has progressed from its origins in early man’s ideas of Nature, to Chinese and Greek world views, to Dante’s vision of Heaven and Hell, to Newton’s Clockwork Universe. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 441H: Neuroethics

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic Kuhl

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32544: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

Over the past few decades, technological advances in human neuroscience research have progressed our understanding of the human brain.  At the same time, these advances have highlighted the potential implications and applications of neuroscience research for society and have raised many ethical questions. Read more


Spring 2019 Inside-Out Exchange HC 444H/431H: Geography and American Folk, From Angelou to Springsteen

Professor: Shaul Cohen

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32545: Monday, 18:00 - 20:50 @ OSP Salem (Tuesday 4/2 only, 18:00 - 20:50 @ CHA 201)

How do we know who we are?  Identity is a story that we tell ourselves, and that is told to us, and about us, and is made up of many strands that continue to unfold in and around us.  In this course we will draw upon elements of popular and folk cultures to examine some of the stories that contribute to American identities. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 444H/441H: Science Education in Remote Locations

Professor: Kenneth Doxsee

4.00 credits

•  CRN 32546: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ LIB 322

Teaching science without experimentation is like trying to teach weight-lifting without actually lifting weights. Unfortunately, financial limitations can limit access to experimental science in even the wealthiest of communities. In less well-off areas, experimentation is likely limited to demonstrations or computer simulations or, even more commonly, simply not performed. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

2.00 credits

•  CRN 32547: Friday, 09:00 - 10:50 @ CHA 101

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Daphne Gallagher

2.00 credits

•  CRN 32548: Monday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 102
•  CRN 36214: Monday, 16:00 - 17:50 @ CHA 201

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Read more


Spring 2019 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: David Frank

2.00 credits

•  CRN 32550: Tuesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101
•  CRN 32549: Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Read more