Spring 2020 Course Descriptions

HC 209H: Decision Making for Sustainability

Professor: Kenneth Doxsee

4.00 credits

• CRN 32655: Monday & Wednesday, 1200-1330 @ CHA 301

Through a series of readings, guided discussions, and analyses of case studies, this course will provide students with the broad scientific and behavioral knowledge needed to make informed decisions and engage in thoughtful discourse about various contemporary issues in the realm of sustainability. Read More


HC 209H: The Aesthetics of Mathematics

Professor: Chris Sinclair

4.00 credits

• CRN 32656: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1600-1720 @ CHA 202

Euclid proved there are infinitely many primes using the following argument: Suppose there are only finitely many primes, which we may list, and multiply them together and add one. Read More


HC 209H: Discovery of Fundamental Particles and Interactions

Professor: Chris Potter

4.00 credits

• CRN 36573: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1000-1120 @ GSH 103

We will discuss the discovery of fundamental particles, of which we are all made, from a historical perspective. Read More


HC 209H : The Story of Life: An introduction to Biology

Professor: Rachel Rodman

4.00 Credits

• CRN 37206: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

In this course, we will trace the story of life: when it began, and how it changed, over billions of years, to give rise to everything that has ever lived, from bacteria to pineapples to mushrooms to turtles to people. Read More


HC 223H: “Build My Gallows High”: Written and Cinematic Noir

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

4.00 credits

• CRN 32657: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1200-1320 @ CHA 201

Mystery editor Otto Penzler once described noir as something that is “virtually impossible to define, but everyone thinks they know it when they see it.” Read More


HC 223H: 1970’s Media and Culture

Professor: Gretchen Soderlund

4.00 credits

• CRN 36284: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1600-1720 @ CHA 202

This class considers the 1970s, a pivotal decade that often gets overlooked in historical literature and media criticism. The decade is typically treated as a transitional one, as a long 1960s-induced cultural and political hangover or as a period of economic decline that led to the triumph of Reagan-era conservatism. Read More


HC 223H: Climate Change and the Problem of Representation

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 36287: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1400-1520 @ CHA 201

What are the representational demands of climate change and environmental catastrophe on literature and artistic production? Does the temporal and spatial scale of the problem make it difficult for our aesthetic modes of representation to respond adequately to the present crisis? In this course we will consider both the limits and possibilities of literary and other cultural forms to respond to the burgeoning reality of climate change. Read More


HC 223H: Reading Spaces

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

4.00 credits

• CRN 32662: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1000-1120 @ CHA 301

This course explores literature of the city since the early nineteenth century. Read More


HC 223H: Researching Oregon Writers: Kesey and Le Guin

Professor: Stephen Rust

4.00 credits

• CRN 32660: Wednesdays & Fridays, 1200-1320 @ CHA 202

Oregon and the Pacific Northwest boast a flourishing literary scene, awash in award-winning, nationally-recognized authors from diverse backgrounds publishing in a wide range of styles and genres.  Two of Oregon’s most famous writers, Ken Kesey and Ursula K. Le Guin have deeply influenced American literary history and touched the lives of hundreds of millions of readers. Read More


HC 223H: Writing the Family, Writing the Self

Professor: Monique Balbuena

4.00 credits

• CRN 32658: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1000-1120 @ CHA 201

•CRN 32659: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1200-1320 @ CHA 201

 We find our ancestors or we invent our ancestors. Or we do both. Read More


HC 233H: American Prisons

Professor: Timothy Williams

4.00 credits

• CRN 32663: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1000-1120 @ CHA 201

In this course students will learn and develop basic research skills as they write an original research paper in the discipline of history. The course is structured in a way that leads students along the typical research trail while simultaneously discussing approaches to research related to the course theme. Read More


HC 233H: Economics of Healthcare Systems

Professor: Terry Ivanauskas

4.00 credits

• CRN 32665: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1200-1320 @ CHA 202

According to a 2018 report from the newspaper The Economist, “Despite the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, America remains an outlier in health-care provision. It has some of the best hospitals in the world, but it is also the only large rich country without universal health coverage. And health-care costs can be financially ruinous.” Read more 


HC 233H: Women in Society and Politics: Western Europe 1789-1918

Professor: Emily Gilkey

4.00 credits

• CRN 32667: Monday & Wednesday, 1000-1120 @ CHA 202

Historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich famously observed that “well-behaved women seldom make history.”  This phrase has become a feminist rallying cry, but in its original context the quote states a simple fact in studying the history of women.  The women whose lives appear most frequently in the historical record were those who were somehow extraordinary or transgressive, such that male record-keepers took note. Read More


HC 233H: Analyzing Networks

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

• CRN 32664: Tuesday & Thursday, 1400-1520 @ CHA 202

• CRN 36291: Tuesday & Thursday, 1200-1320 @ ANS 195

This is the age of networks and of network analysis. All major social spheres are increasingly shaped by the revolution in network analysis: Business and innovation, politics and policy analysis, culture, health care, family life, and the academic enterprise.  Read more.


HC 408H: Thesis Orientation - Baldwin

Professor: Dare Baldwin

1.00 credits

• CRN 32673: Saturday 4/11 only, 1100-1550 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.


HC 408H: Thesis Orientation - Williams

Professor: Tim Williams

1.00 credits

• CRN 32675: Saturday 4/18 only, 1100-1550 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.


HC 408H: Thesis Orientation - Rosenberg

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

1.00 credits

• CRN 32674: Thursday 4/23 only, 1700-2150 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.


HC 421H: Ethics, Religion, and Literature: Tolstoy's Resurrection

Professor:  Steven Shankman

4.00 credits

• CRN 32677: ♦ Tuesdays, 1800-2050 @ OSP Salem  / ♦ Monday 3/30, 1730-2020 @ CHA 201

This is an Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program course. It is open only to CHC students, and requires an application, interview, and instructor approval to register for this course.  If you are not familiar with the Inside-Out Program, please check out the information on the Honors College website and watch the Inside-Out documentary “On the Inside Looking Out”. Read More


HC 421H: Hamlet Unbound

Professor: Martin Klebes

4.00 credits

• CRN 36313: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1600-1720 @ CHA 301

This Colloquium examines the legacy of Shakespeare's Hamlet beyond the realm of British literature. Read More


HC 421H: Music, Film and Glass Ceilings

Professor: Brian McWhorter

4.00 Credits

• CRN 32678: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1000-1120 @ CHA 202

This course will explore the aesthetics of music in film; how composers and directors cast music to draw emotion and pull focus. With few exceptions, we will explore very recent films and their conjoined musical scores and soundtracks. Critically, we will examine the cracks being made in the glass ceiling that has surrounded this particular field for so long.  


HC 421H: Arctic Ice in Science, Policy and the Imagination

Professor: Casey Shoop, Mark Carey & David Sutherland

4.00 credits

• CRN 36565: Tuesdays & Thursdays @ ESL 105

Students may register for this exciting new team-taught course through this course number or through the linked HC 431H and HC 441H colloquia. The three colloquia will be taught coincidentally and interactively and all three professors will be present in every class session for enhanced interdisciplinary learning. Read More


HC 431H: Arctic Ice in Science, Policy and the Imagination

Professor: Mark Carey, Casey Shoop & David Sutherland

4.00 credits

• CRN 36566: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1000-1150 @ ESL 105

Students may register for this exciting new team-taught course through this course number or through the linked HC 431H and HC 441H colloquia. The three colloquia will be taught coincidentally and interactively and all three professors will be present in every class session for enhanced interdisciplinary learningRead More


HC 431H: Search

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 36328: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1400-1520 @ GSH 103

Search techniques are as old inquiry itself. Yet in recent years, tremendous attention has been focused in this area, as Internet services have found new ways to implement and monetize search. In this course, we will place new search technology in a long historical framework in order to better understand the interaction of old and new forms of inquiry in our information age.


HC 431H: The University Past and Present

Professor:  Ian McNeely

4.00 credits

• CRN 32682: Mondays, 1400-1650 @ GSH 103

The university is one of the world’s longest-lived institutions, and yet those of us who work and study in universities typically spend little time thinking about their history, and how that history affects how we work, live, and think today. Read more


HC 441H: Arctic Ice in Science, Policy and the Imagination

Professor: David Sutherland, Mark Carey & Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 36567: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1000-1150 @ ESL 105

Students may register for this exciting new team-taught course through this course number or through the linked HC 431H and HC 441H colloquia. The three colloquia will be taught coincidentally and interactively and all three professors will be present in every class session for enhanced interdisciplinary learning. Read more


HC 441H: Energy Now: The Science behind Current Energy Practice and Policy

Professor: Alexandra Rempel

4.00 credits

• CRN 32688: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1400-1520 @ CHA 301

The effects of climate change are now evident worldwide, and their connections to fossil fuel consumption are clear and convincing. Energy policies are changing in response, but amidst great controversy, and available information regarding the underlying science is often conflicting. Read more


HC 441H: The Mystique of Marine Mammals in History, Science, and Culture

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 32687: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1000-1120 @ CHA 301

Marine mammals (whales, dolphins, seals, and others) occupy a special place in the human psyche. Throughout history, we have hunted, feared, and revered our sea-dwelling mammalian relatives. Read More


HC 441H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing - Chasing Planets

Professor: Carol Paty

4.00 credits

• CRN 32686: Fridays, 0900-1150 @ CHA 301

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. Read More


HC 441H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Neuroscience Journalism

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic

4.00 credits

• CRN 36311: Thursdays, 1400-1650 @ CHA 102

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. Read more


HC 444H/431H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Nothing About Us Without Us - Writing About Disability

Professor: Judith Raiskin

4.00 credits

• CRN 36506: Thursdays, 0900-1150 @ CHA 101

Disability Studies challenges our naturalized understandings of bodies, ability, disability and illness and explores how those beliefs affect all our lives, whether we are disabled or not. In this class we will examine texts (essays, books, films) that challenge stereotypes about different types of disabilities. Read more


HC 444H/421H: The Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement and the Rise of Trumpist Romantic Populism: Beyond Polarization in the United States

Professor: David Frank

4.00 credits

• CRN 36508: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1400-1520 @ CHA 301

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the long civil rights movement in the United States. Read more


HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus - Moffitt

Professor:  Michael Moffitt

2.00 Credits

• CRN 32691: Fridays, 0900-1050 @ CHA 101

• CRN 32694: Fridays, 1200-1350 @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more


HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus - Cheng

Professor:  Mai-Lin Cheng

2.00 Credits

• CRN 32692: Tuesdays, 1200-1350 @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read More


HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus - Gallagher

Professor:  Daphne Gallagher

2.00 Credits

• CRN 32695: Thursdays, 1000-1150 @ CHA 102

• CRN 32693: Wednesdays, 1200-1350 @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read More