Spring 2021 Course Descriptions

HC 101H: Artificial Intelligence: The Culture of Minds and Machines

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 36210: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:15-13:45 @ REMOTE

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?  Philip K. Dick’s titular question frames the concerns of this course on the relationship between minds and machines. Computers increasingly talk to us, make book recommendations, drive cars;  Read more


 

HC 101H: The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Professor: Tobin Hansen

4 credits

• CRN 37055: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

What is a border? This course examines the U.S.-Mexico borderlands region and the historical legacies of its peoples, cultures, and politics. By focusing on this region, we will gain insights more broadly into transborder communities; change and exchange in cultural and political borderlands; border policing; transnational migration and displacement; trafficking and smuggling; borderlands violence; and how borderlands are portrayed in politics, popular culture, and media. Read more


 

HC 221H: Trans* and Cinema

Professor: Allison McGuffie

4.00 credits

• CRN 36211: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

Trans* and Cinema traces the history and present of transgender representations in cinema and new media. Read more


 

HC 221H: Gender in the Greco-Roman World

Professor: Lowell Bowditch

4.00 credits

• CRN 36212: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

This course will explore the construction of gender and norms of sexuality in Greco-Roman antiquity.  We shall consider attitudes toward the body, homo-, bi-, and heterosexuality, the household, privacy, and religious ritual as it reflects issues of gender. Read more


 

HC 221H: Shakespeare and Politics

Professor: Brent Dawson

4.00 credits

• CRN 36213: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

This course focuses on Shakespeare’s second set of history plays, known as the Henriad. These plays depict a moment of crisis in English history, when a king is dethroned, several popular uprisings follow, and  Read more


 

HC 221H: The Pop Voice

Professor: Drew Nobile

4.00 credits

• CRN 36214: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

In pop songs, the sound of the singer’s voice carries at least as much meaning as the words it sings. In this course, we will investigate how pop singers communicate aspects of Read more


 

HC 221H: Music and Emotion

Professor: Zachary Wallmark

4.00 credits

• CRN 36215: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

A discussion and activity-based introduction to the psychology, philosophy, and history of music and emotion, with an emphasis on contemporary approaches from cognitive science. Read more


 

HC 221H: Philosophy of Science Fiction in Film

Professor: Steven Brence

4.00 credits

• CRN 36216: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

What is it to be a human being? Does technology enhance humanity (us, that which makes us human, or both) or threaten it? Could technology become human, combine with us, or even replace us? What do current or emerging trends, if extended into the future, mean? Are we on a path to transformation? Extinction? Read more


 

HC 223H: Reading Cities

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

4.00 credits

• CRN 32531: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

This course explores literature of the city since the early nineteenth century. It examines questions of race, power, and space in the representations of the individual and the crowd, highlighting the role of the urban observer. Read more


 

HC 223H: Abstraction

Professor: Teo Tze-Yin

4.00 credits

• CRN 32532: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

When we think of abstraction, we may imagine a rarefied way of thinking that does not pay attention to the details of real life. Or else we may think of abstract art as an aesthetic that is uninterested in representing reality - a kind of art that is so general that it can mean anything to anyone and thereby even loses meaning altogether. Read more


 

HC 223H: "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead": Narratives of Retribution and Revenge

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

4.00 credits

• CRN 32657: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1200-1320 @ REMOTE

Focused on both narrative readings (mostly poetry, drama, and short fiction) and narrative films, this section of HC 223 concerns how different cultures, over time, have examined through narrative the mechanics, potentialities, limitations, and consequences of retribution and revenge.  Over the term, we will work together to Read more


HC 231H: Out in the Archives: Preserving LGBTQ History

Professor: Judith Raiskin

4.00 credits

• CRN 36217: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

Much LGBTQ history has been suppressed by the imperatives of the closet and rendered invisible by library cataloging traditions embedded in systemic homophobia and heterosexism. As the artist Tee Corinne put it: “The lack of a publicly accessible history is Read more


 

HC 231H: Conflict and Cooperation: Global Perspectives

Professor: Galen Martin

4.00 credits

• CRN 36218: Tuesday & Thursday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

“Peacebuilding,” according to the editors of our course text, “has emerged as one of the most critically important, albeit vexing, aspects of international involvement in conflict and post-conflict situations.”  Conflict--especially violent confrontations--dominates the headlines and our collective attention. History is often perceived as a series of wars. Read more


 

HC 231H: Healthy Relationships

Professor: Deanna Linville-Knobelspiesse

4.00 credits

• CRN 36219: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

The primary aim of this course is to gain knowledge and skills associated with healthy relationships. Students will examine dynamics of healthy relationships and distressed relationships. Read more


 

HC 231H: Food Sovereignty

Professor: David Meek

4.00 credits

• CRN 36220: Monday & Wednesday, 0815-0945 @ REMOTE

Do you produce the food you eat? Probably not, as few in the United States are self-sufficient producers of food today. Until relatively recently, this was not the case. Read more


 

HC 231H: Language and Critical Thinking in Adolescents

Professor: Marilyn Nippold

4.00 credits

• CRN 36221: Mondays & Wednesdays, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

Drawing from principles in psychology, linguistics, education, and philosophy, this course will involve lectures, readings, discussions, and activities (e.g., research) that address the following questions:  1. What is critical thinking?  2. Why is it important in the 21st century?  3. How does it develop during adolescence?4. How can educators promote critical thinking in adolescents? Read more


 

HC 231H: Public Speaking

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

• CRN 36222: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

Numerous studies reveal that many Americans, including college students, are apprehensive about public speaking, including sharing their ideas and viewpoints in  Read more


 

HC 233H: Climate Change from the Perspective of Place

Professor: Leslie McLees

4.00 credits

• CRN 32540: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

This course will provide a spatial understanding of how climate change occurs both from a scientific perspective and a cultural perspective. Read more


 

HC 233H: Hong Kong Democracy Movement in Historical Context

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

4.00 credits

• CRN 32541: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

Hong Kong was once an obscure island removed from global political issues.  In recent years, it has become a center of contemporary concerns about the survival of democratic institutions and human rights.  Read more


 

HC 233H: Applied Research with Essential Workers under COVID-19

Professor: Mark Brenner

4.00 credits

• CRN 32542: Tuesday& Thursday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

This course will use a mixed methods approach to examine the impacts of COVID-19 on groups of essential workers in Oregon.  Read more


 

HC 233H: Food & Colonialism in World History

Professor: Hannah Cutting-Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 36116: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

In this course students will develop basic research, writing, and presentation skills in the discipline of history. We will spend the first part of class narrowing down individual research topics and discussing recent scholarship Read more


 

HC 233H: British National Health Service in Historical Context

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

4.00 credits

• CRN 36117: Tuesday & Thursday, 0815-0945 @ REMOTE

The British National Health Service Act of 1946 created a system of universal health care for all citizens of the United Kingdom.  A program born out of the devastation of World War II, the NHS in recent months has been a major voice in global efforts to address the Covid-19 pandemic.  Read more


 

HC 241H: The Science of Learning and Memory

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic

4.00 credits

• CRN 36224: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

• CRN 36225: Tuesday & Thursday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

Our memories shape our identities and give meaning to our lives, yet they are not always as reliable as we would like.  In this course, we will explore the successes and failures of our memories by examining key concepts, theories, and methodological approaches for studying human learning and memory.  Read more


 

HC 241H: Mutants and the Making of Us

Professor: Daniel Grimes

4.00 credits

• CRN 36226: Monday & Wednesday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

From Homer’s cyclops to CRISPR technology, circus “freak shows” to evolutionary biology, X-men comics to designer babies, the idea of mutation has a long history in science, literature and culture. Read more


 

HC 241H: Genes and Disease

Professor: Diane Hawley

4.00 credits

• CRN 36227: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

This course will examine the biochemical mechanisms by which genes contribute to human health. Read more


 

HC 241: Psychoactive Drugs: Neurons to Neighborhoods

Professor: Christina Karns

4.00 credits

• CRN 36228: Monday & Wednesday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

Psychoactive drugs are a pervasive part of modern life. As the lines blur between recreational drugs and pharmacological treatments, a neuroscience perspective on these issues may clarify policy and public health implications of the changing times. Read more


 

HC 241H : Knowing and Saving our Relatives: Primate Ecology and Conservation

Professor: Larry Ulibarri

4.00 credits

• CRN 36229: Monday & Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

Primates are our closest relatives, and many are on the edge of extinction. Conserving primates and their habitats requires an understanding of their ecology. Read more


 

HC 241H: Unusual Oceanographic Events

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 36230: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

• CRN 36231: Monday & Wednesday,1415-1545 @ REMOTE

In order to understand what is unusual, one must first understand what is “usual”.  Read more


 

HC 277H: Spring Thesis Orientation - Sinclair

Professor: Christopher Sinclair

2.00 credits

• CRN 36232: Friday, 0915-1045 @ REMOTE

• CRN 36233: Wednesday, 0815-0945 @ REMOTE

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 277H: Spring Thesis Orientation - Raisanen

Professor: Elizabeth Raisanen

2.00 credits

• CRN 36234: Monday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

• CRN 36235: Monday, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 277H: Spring Thesis Orientation - Gallagher

Professor: Daphne Gallagher

2.00 credits

CRN 37089: Thursdays, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

CRN 37128: Mondays, 1615-1745 @ REMOTE

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. It creatively applies the methods of the discipline and tests students' power and limits, reflecting dialogue, common work, and apprenticeship with faculty members in their specialized fields of interest. Read more


 

HC 301H: Backyard Soundscapes

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 36282: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

Sound is an essential component of natural habitats, and it is critical to the survival of many organisms. This course will introduce you to the emerging field of acoustic ecology (“eco-acoustics”). Read more


 

HC 410H: Higher Education in the United States: An Introduction to Key Issues and Challenges

Professor: Michael H. Schill

2.00 credits

• CRN 37045: Mondays, 1515-1715 @ REMOTE               

       Higher education today faces an unprecedented set of challenges.  Even before COVID-19, many of the most divisive issues facing our nation were playing themselves out in the ivory tower.  Partisan politics either cast universities as places overrun by the left and inhospitable to freedom of speech or as corporativist entities out to exploit the poor and middle class. Read more


 

HC 421H : Ethics and Literature: Tolstoy's Shorter and Late Fiction

Professor: Steven Shankman

4.00 credits

• CRN 32554: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) is one of the greatest and most influential masters of the novel. The Russian literary classics of the nineteenth century, including the fiction of Tolstoy, made a profound impression on  Read more


 

HC 421H : Invisible Landscapes

Professor: Liska Chan

4.00 credits

• CRN 32555: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.— Marcel Proust (1871 - 1922)  The goal of this course is to explore the tension between the visual and non-visual qualities of the landscape. Read more


 

HC 431H: Secrecy

Professor: Michael Moffitt

4.00 credits

• CRN 32556: Wednesday & Friday, 0815-0945 @ REMOTE

Under what conditions can we—or should we be able to—learn that which others wish to keep secret? This colloquium will introduce the complex, overlapping policy assumptions and tradeoffs associated with questions of secrecy. Read more


 

HC 431H: Planning the City

Professor: Eleanora Redaelli

4.00 credits

• CRN 32557: Tuesday & Thursday, 0815-0945 @ REMOTE

The course examines the praxis of planning focusing on plans as text. We will examine plans of American cities. Read more


 

HC 441H Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Chasing Planets

Professor: Carol Paty

4.00 credits

• CRN 32559: Friday, 0930-1245 @ REMOTE

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. Read more


 

HC 441H: Bread 101

Professor: Judith Eisen & Karen Guillemin 

4.00 credits

• CRN 32561: Tuesday & Thursday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

Bread is a very complex medium, looking nothing like the original seed of grain from which it originates. Yet when we mix a few simple ingredients we are able to induce a transformation that results in  Read more


 

HC 441H: Listening to the Earth: How to Make Sense of Patterns and Events in Environmental Data

Professor: Leif Karlstrom

4.00 credits

• CRN 32562: Monday & Wednesday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

Earth Science is undergoing a data revolution that stands to transform the way we observe and understand the natural world. Read more


 

HC 444H/421H Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Bridging the Public Divide: Translation, Argument, and Democratic Deliberation in Oregon

Professor: David Frank

4.00 credits

• CRN 32565: Wednesday, 1415-1715 @ REMOTE

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. Read more


 

HC 444H/421H: How the West Was Spun: Myth and History in the American West

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

CRN 36537: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy.  The mythic representation of the American West occupies an enduring place in American popular culture. Read more


 

HC 444H/431H: Geography and American Folks

Professor: Shaul Cohen

4.00 credits

• CRN 32564: Wednesday, 1415-1715 @ REMOTE

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy.  How do we know who we are?  Read more


 

HC 444H/431H: Higher Education Organization & Diversity

Professor: Lesley-Anne Pittard

4.00 credits

• CRN 36971: Tuesday & Thursday, 1015-1145 @ REMOTE

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy.  This course aims to provide an introduction to American higher education and explore the dynamics and impacts of social change largely driven by an evolving cultural and political economy. Read more


 

HC 444H/421H: Reading Experiments: Race, Power, and Identity in Literature

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

4.00 credits

• CRN 37155: Monday & Wednesday, 12:15-13:45 @ REMOTE

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy.

This course asks how literature represents and transforms our understandings of race, power, and identity. Read more


 

HC 477H: Spring Thesis Prospectus - McWhorter

Professor: Brian McWhorter

2.00 credits

• CRN 32566: Friday, 0930-1115 @ REMOTE

• CRN 32567: Tuesday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

HC 477H Thesis  Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application at http://forms.uoregon.edu.  (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password.), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more


 

HC 477H: Spring Thesis Prospectus - Jacobsen

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

2.00 credits

• CRN 32568: Wednesday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

• CRN 32570: Monday, 1415-1545 @ REMOTE

• CRN 36309:Monday, 1215-1345 @ REMOTE

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application at http://forms.uoregon.edu.  (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password.), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more