Spring 2022 Course Descriptions

HC101H: Drama in Ancient Greece and Medieval Japan

Professor: Corinne Bayerl

4.00 credits

• CRN 32796: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:20pm @ CHA 202

This seminar will explore the relationship between drama in comic and tragic modes in two different cultures: 5th-and 4th-century B.C. Athens and 14th-century Japan. Our main goal is to understand why the separation of drama into a serious and a lighthearted genre occurred in the first place, why playwrights in both cultures settled on one or the other, and why they did not mix both genres to create a hybrid form, such as tragicomedy, which is of later historical origin. read more

 

HC221H: The Literary Gothic

Professor: Katherine Brundan

4.00 credits

• CRN 32798: Monday & Wednesday, 8:30-9:50am @ CHA 201

This course explores diverse manifestations of the literary Gothic, from its supernaturally-inflected inception to its modern use as a way of articulating and approaching legacies of racial oppression. read more

 

HC221H: Literary Lives of Animals

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 32799: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-1:20pm @ CHA 301

Shortly before his death, philosopher Jacques Derrida turned to “the question of the animal,” and he posed that question in the reciprocal gaze of his house cat. We have all stood before the eyes of a non-human animal and wondered about the intimate meaning of that look, the only partially accessible worlds in those eyes as well as what they see in us. read more

 

HC221H: Playing with Poetry

Professor: Tze-Yin Teo

4.00 credits

• CRN 32800: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00-3:20pm @ UNIV 303

"The toy," writes the French poet of modernity Charles Baudelaire, "is the child’s earliest initiation into art." Playing with something, he implies, can be a powerful way to begin engaging its fundaments. read more

 

HC221H: Trans* and Cinema

Professor: Allison McGuffie

4.00 credits

• CRN 32802: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20am @ CHA 201

Trans* and Cinema traces the history and present of transgender representations in cinema and new media. Covering films from Some Like It Hot to Paris is Burning to Tangerine, this course considers the importance of how marginalized genders appear on screen. Students will be introduced to the foundations of gender theory and film analysis and take a deep dive into the newest contributions of transgender media studies. read more

 

HC221H: Evolution and the Modern

Professor: Suzanne Clark

4.00 credits

• CRN 32803: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00-3:20pm @ CHA 202

The Origin of Species, published by Darwin in 1859, caused an immediate sensation.  He argued that species have not been created in one unchanging form, that even humans have evolved,--from animals; he argued that Natural Selection chose how varieties would change and survive in an ongoing struggle for life. read more

 

HC221H: The Sturm und Drang of the American Far Right

Professor: Rebecca Schuman

4.00 credits

• CRN 32806: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20am @ MCK 347

We all watched on January 6, 2021, as the apex (or nadir) of the contemporary American far right played out live: the storming of the U.S. Capitol. read more

 

HC231H: Global Conflict and Cooperation

Professor: Galen Martin

4.00 credits

• CRN 32808: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00-3:20pm @ CON 301

This course explores how both conflict and cooperation shape our highly globalized world.  read more

 

HC231H: Global Wellbeing

Professor: David Meek

4.00 credits

• CRN 32809: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20am @ CHA 301

This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to human wellbeing. We will take a thematic approach to analyzing the factors that impact wellbeing, focusing on health, education, and the environment. read more

 

HC231H: In and Out of the Museum

Professor: Eleanora Redaelli

4.00 credits

• CRN 32810: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30-9:50am @ CHA 201

This course explores the multifaceted aspects of an art museum, focusing on a case study: the Portland Art Museum (PAM). read more

 

HC 231H: Deportation from the United States

Professor: Tobin Hansen

4.00 credits

• CRN 32811: Monday & Wednesday, 4:00-5:20pm @ CHA 301

This course explores deportation from the United States in historical and contemporary social and political context. read more

 

HC231H: Music and Politics

Professor: Anita Chari

4.00 credits

• CRN 32813: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:20pm @ CH 103

How does music relate to politics and power in social movements, subcultures, and the marketplace? This course will explore the relationship of music to politics, primarily in the US context. read more

 

HC231H: Sustainability Movements Around the World

Professor: Derrick Hindery

4.00 credits

• CRN 32814: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-1:20pm @ GSH 103

It’s easy to get discouraged these days with daunting issues like environmental injustice, climate change, and biodiversity loss, particularly with sensationalized “negative news.” read more

 

HC231H: Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Medieval Spain

Professor: Lisa Wolverton

4.00 credits

• CRN 32815: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20am @ CHA 201

This course focuses specifically on two related aspects of Spanish history from the eleventh to fifteenth centuries:  the peninsular kingdoms as “frontier societies” and as multicultural, multireligious societies. read more

 

HC241H: Sea Sick: Disease Ecology in the Ocean

Professor: Reyn Yoshioka

4.00 credits

• CRN 32816: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20am @ MCK 347

• CRN 32819: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00-3:20pm @ MCK 473

In 2013, sea stars along the North American west coast began to melt away. As the disease outbreak unfolded, it was soon clear that this was one of largest marine wildlife epizootics recorded, affecting over a dozen species of sea stars and decimating their populations. read more

 

HC241H: Atoms: Mother Nature’s Legos

Professor: Rebecca Altman

4.00 credits

• CRN 32821: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-1:20pm @ MCK 349

By engaging with the three-dimensional nature of molecules, we will learn why their shapes are crucial to some of the most important parts of our lives, such as food, technology, and our DNA. read more

 

HC241H: Knowing and Saving our Relatives: Primate Ecology and Conservation

Professor: Larry Ulibarri

4.00 credits

• CRN 32818: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00-5:20pm @ CHA 201

Primates are our closest relatives, and many are on the edge of extinction. Conserving primates and their habitats requires an understanding of their ecology. read more

 

HC241H: AI For Good

Professor: Steve Fickas

4.00 credits

• CRN 32820: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:20pm @ PSC B042

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been getting bad press, and rightfully so. It’s being used to promote profits over people or to assert power over marginalized groups. read more

 

HC241H: Pick Your Poison

Professor: Lindsay Hinkle

4.00 credits

• CRN 32822: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30-9:50am @ CHA 301

• CRN 32823: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00-3:20pm @ CHA 301

When you imagine a person preparing a poison, does an image of the Evil Queen from the film Snow White, disguised as an old witch, dunking an apple in a cauldron filled with green liquid come to mind?  read more

 

HC277H: Thesis Orientation 2022 - Shoop

Professor: Casey Shoop

2.00 credits

• CRN 32824: Monday, 2:00-3:50pm @ CHA 301

• CRN 32825: Wednesday, 2:00-3:50pm @ CHA 301

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. read more

 

HC277H: Thesis Orientation 2022 - Raisanen

Professor: Elizabeth Raisanen

2.00 credits

• CRN 32826: Tuesday, 12:00-1:50pm @ CHA 201

• CRN 32828: Tuesday, 2:00-3:50pm @ CHA 201

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. read more

 

HC277H: Thesis Orientation 2022 - Chan

Professor: Liska Chan

2.00 credits

• CRN 32827: Thursday, 8:00-9:50am @ FR 225

• CRN 32830: Thursday, 12:00-1:50pm @ FEN 119

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. read more

 

HC277H: Thesis Orientation 2022 - Gallagher

Professor: Daphne Gallagher

2.00 credits

• CRN 32829: Monday, 12:00-1:50pm @ CHA 202

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process. read more

 

HC301H: Social Network Analysis - Jacobsen

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

• CRN 32831: Wednesday & Friday, 10:00-11:20am @ CHA 202

This is the age of networks and of network analysis. All major social spheres are increasingly shaped by the revolution in network analysis: Business and innovation, politics and policy analysis, culture, health care, family life, and the academic enterprise. read more

 

HC 301H: Consumer Research

Professor: Alejandra Rodriguez-Martin

4.00 credits

• CRN 32832: Monday & Wednesday, 4:00-5:50pm @ CHA 202

Humans are very complex and interesting creatures, which is why we have so many kinds of social science research fields focused on learning more about what makes us tick, and how we function and interact with others in our surroundings, society, institutions, etc. read more

 

HC301H: “Build My Gallows High”: Written and Cinematic Noir

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

4.00 credits

• CRN 32833: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:20pm @ MCK 473

Mystery editor Otto Penzler once described noir as something that is “virtually impossible to define, but everyone thinks they know it when they see it.”  Situated at a crossroads of visual and print media—sped along by the consequences of one war, and solidified by observations made as another war ended—noir is a signifier that seems meant to avoid being pinned down. read more

 

HC301H: Taste of Power

Professor: Hannah Cutting-Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 32834: Monday & Wednesday, 8:30-9:50am @ CHA 202

• CRN 33052 Monday & Wednesday, 2:00-3:20pm @ CHA 201

In this course students will develop basic research, writing, and presentation skills in the discipline of history. read more

 

HC301H: Backyard Soundscapes

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 33054: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00-3:20pm @ MCK 349

Sound is an essential component of natural habitats, and it is critical to the survival of many organisms. read more

 

HC410H: Higher Education in the United States: An Introduction to Key Issues and Challenges

Professor: Michael Schill & Kevin Reed

2.00 credits

• CRN 35888Tuesday, 2:00-3:50pm @ TBA

Higher education today faces an unprecedented set of challenges.  Even before COVID-19, many of the most divisive issues facing our nation were playing themselves out in the ivory tower.  Partisan politics either cast universities as places overrun by the left and inhospitable to freedom of speech or as corporativist entities out to exploit the poor and middle class.  read more

 

HC421H: All The Sad Young Literary Men

Professor: Rebecca Schuman

4.00 credits

• CRN 32841: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:50pm @ ANS 192

For centuries, the landscape of “literary novels” in the English-speaking world was dominated by one type of voice: A man, usually young, usually of Anglo-European ancestry, caught in an existential struggle that usually involved tropes such as a heterosexual relationship gone awry, a sordid family history, the indignities of work, or all three. read more

 

HC421H: After the End of the World

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 32840: Monday & Wednesday, 4:00-5:50pm @ CHA 201

The open secret of apocalyptic literature has always been that it is really about what happens after the ending. The ancient Greek etymology of ‘apocalypse’ is to uncover or disclose something. What is finally revealed to us in our imagination of the ending?  Can the ground be cleared for the apprehension of a new world beyond our precarious present? As counterintuitive as it might seem, is there a way in which this is an optimistic genre? This course will explore contemporary post-apocalyptic literature and film with an eye toward the curious interdependence of the genre’s destructive and creative impulses.  read more

 

HC431H: Queer Theory and Intersectionality through Fungi

Professor: Andrea Herrera

4.00 credits

• CRN 32842: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:50am @ MCK 240B

What can the study of fungi tell us about the human condition? Is it possible to explore some of life’s biggest questions by pondering the properties of mushrooms, lichens, and algae? What could such topics possibly have to teach us about identity, community, sexuality, power, pleasure, and the self? read more

 

HC434/421H: East Asian Literature as World Literature: Power, Prestige, and Literary Prizes

Professor: Jina Kim

4.00 credits

• CRN 35992: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00-5:20pm @ CHA 202

What qualities merit the awarding of prizes in literature, and how does a culture of award-giving influence the production and reception of literature? read more

 

HC434H/431H: African Military History

Professor: A.B. Assensoh

4.00 credits

• CRN 32843: Friday, 2:00-5:20pm @ CHA 201

In African political History, a nation on the second largest continent (Africa) was often considered both stable and progressive if there had not been a military intervention – i.e. coup d’etat -- in its national politics. read more

 

HC441H: The Mystique of Marine Mammals in History, Science and Culture

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 32844: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-1:20pm @ CHA 201

Marine mammals (whales, dolphins, seals, and others) occupy a special place in the human psyche. read more

 

HC441H: Water: A Deep Dive

Professor: Lindsay Hinkle

4.00 credits

• CRN 32845: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:50pm @ CHA 301

On the surface, water is a small molecule made of two hydrogen atoms attached to a single oxygen atom.  While this molecule may be little, it is fierce! read more

 

HC441H: Evolution Through Art and Story

Professor: Rachel Rodman

4.00 credits

• CRN 35480: Monday & Wednesday, 3:00-4:50pm @ STB 151

Variation, combined with selection, leads to change. This is true in biological populations. Over billions of years, exactly this has given rise to everything that has ever lived: mushrooms, tigers, daffodils, and bacteria. read more

 

HC441H: Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing: Chasing Planets

Professor: Carol Paty

4.00 credits

• CRN 32846: Friday, 9:00-11:50am @ CHA 102

For centuries humans have looked to the stars. Some were searching for patterns, some for meaning, and others for direction both literally and figuratively. With the advent of modern observing technology and advances in our understanding of the physics driving the formation and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planets, the questions motivating us to look to the heavens have undergone a transformation. read more

 

HC441H: The Art of Data Manipulation

Professor: Rebecca Altman

4.00 credits

• CRN 35900: 10:00-11:50am, Monday & Wednesday @ GSH 103

Do you ever wonder what the numbers reported in the news actually mean, or where they come from? How do you know you can trust the story the numbers are telling... or the story the authors are saying the numbers are telling? read more

 

HC444H/421H: Laboratories of the Everyday: Race, Science, and Literature

Professor: Angela Rovak

4.00 credits

• CRN 32847: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:50am @ CHA 301

This course will focus on the ways that Black authors have integrated scientific theory into their literary works. Science and literature often seem at odds, one operating objectively while the other subjectively. read more

 

HC444H/421H: Contemporary Native Theatre: Spinning New Worlds

Professor: Theresa May

4.00 credits

• CRN 32851: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00-3:50pm @ VIL 300

This course applies indigenous methodologies and frameworks to contemporary North American indigenous drama and theatre to discern how contemporary indigenous dramatists engage the project of decolonization.  read more

 

HC444H/431H: Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: The United States in the 1860s

Professor: Timothy Williams

4.00 credits

• CRN 32849: Thursday, 2:00-4:50pm @ CHA 102

More than 150 years after Union victory heralded “a new birth of freedom,” American life seems to echo the 1860s’ ideological, political, and racial discord. White nationalism, violence, electoral suppression, and mistrust of the press, have disrupted civic life in alarmingly resonant ways. read more

 

HC444H/431H: Health Equity: Social Justice in Health

Professor: Erin Bradley

4.00 credits

• CRN 32862: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-1:50pm @ Online SYNC

This course provides a critical analysis of social determinants of health and equity that create and sustain health disparities affecting Black populations in the United States. read more

 

HC444H/431H: Geography and American Folk

Professor: Shaul Cohen

4.00 credits

• CRN 32863: Monday, 2:00-4:50pm @ GSH 130

How do we know who we are?  Identity is a story that we tell ourselves, and that is told to us, and about us, and comes from many strands that unfold in and around us. read more

 

HC444H/431H: Reality Television

Professor: Bish Sen

4.00 credits

• CRN 33121: Monday & Wednesday, 8:30-9:50am @ CHA 301

This course will look at reality television in order to examine the critical role it plays in contemporary culture. read more

 

HC444H/431H: Searching for the Cayuse Five

Professor: Michael Moffitt

4.00 credits

• CRN 32848: Friday, 10:00am-12:50pm @ CHA 301

In 1850, five Cayuse men were hanged and buried near Oregon City, then the capital of the Oregon Territory.  Seminar participants will try to find their burial location. read more

 

HC477H: Thesis Prospectus 2022 - McWhorter

Professor: Brian McWhorter

2.00 credits

• CRN 32854: Thursday, 10:00-11:50am @ CHA 101

• CRN 32861: Tuesday, 10:00-11:50am @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term. To obtain preauthorization, you must complete an online Thesis Prospectus Application Form, which will route to your Primary Thesis Advisor for signature. You have the best chance of getting your first choice of H477H section if you submit this information by Friday of Week 6 of the term before you plan to take the course. You may submit the form and be preauthorized to register for HC 477H until the first week of the term in which you are taking 477 as long as there are seats available.  More information on registering for HC 477H can be found on Canvas. Please contact Academic Thesis and Programs Manager Miriam Jordan (mjordan@uoregon.edu) with questions about registering for Thesis Prospectus.  read more

 

HC477H: Thesis Prospectus 2022 - Jacobsen

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

2.00 credits

• CRN 32856:Thursday, 12:00-1:50pm @ CHA 101

• CRN 32859: Wednesday, 2:00-3:50pm @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term. To obtain preauthorization, you must complete an online Thesis Prospectus Application Form, which will route to your Primary Thesis Advisor for signature. You have the best chance of getting your first choice of H477H section if you submit this information by Friday of Week 6 of the term before you plan to take the course. You may submit the form and be preauthorized to register for HC 477H until the first week of the term in which you are taking 477 as long as there are seats available.  More information on registering for HC 477H can be found on Canvas. Please contact Academic Thesis and Programs Manager Miriam Jordan (mjordan@uoregon.edu) with questions about registering for Thesis Prospectus.  read more

 

HC477H: Thesis Prospectus 2022 - Bayerl

Professor: Corinne Bayerl

2.00 credits

• CRN 32857: Friday, 12:00-1:50pm @ CHA 101

• CRN 32860: Friday, 10:00-11:50am @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term. To obtain preauthorization, you must complete an online Thesis Prospectus Application Form, which will route to your Primary Thesis Advisor for signature. You have the best chance of getting your first choice of H477H section if you submit this information by Friday of Week 6 of the term before you plan to take the course. You may submit the form and be preauthorized to register for HC 477H until the first week of the term in which you are taking 477 as long as there are seats available.  More information on registering for HC 477H can be found on Canvas. Please contact Academic Thesis and Programs Manager Miriam Jordan (mjordan@uoregon.edu) with questions about registering for Thesis Prospectus.  read more

 

HC477H: Thesis Prospectus 2022 - Moffitt

Professor: Michael Moffitt

2.00 credits

• CRN 32852: Wednesday, 12:00-1:50pm @ CHA 101

• CRN 32858: Wednesday, 10:00-11:50am @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term. To obtain preauthorization, you must complete an online Thesis Prospectus Application Form, which will route to your Primary Thesis Advisor for signature. You have the best chance of getting your first choice of H477H section if you submit this information by Friday of Week 6 of the term before you plan to take the course. You may submit the form and be preauthorized to register for HC 477H until the first week of the term in which you are taking 477 as long as there are seats available.  More information on registering for HC 477H can be found on Canvas. Please contact Academic Thesis and Programs Manager Miriam Jordan (mjordan@uoregon.edu) with questions about registering for Thesis Prospectus. read more