Winter 2019 HC 232H: Disease, Public Health, and the Making of the Modern World

Winter Term, 2018-2019

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

4.00 credits

  • CRN 23367: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 – 11:20 @ CHA 301
  • CRN 23359: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 – 13:20 @ CHA 301

This class examines the emergence of modern debates about health and disease and practices of public health in order to gain insight into the larger social, cultural, and political history of the modern world. The class will be broad in geographical and chronological scope.

During the quarter, we will discuss the elimination of malaria in the United States; protests against polio vaccination in Northern Nigeria; smallpox eradication practices in India; the epidemiology of yellow fever in Brazil; the origins of AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa; and current vaccine anxieties in the United Kingdom. We’ll also review the impact of factors more commonly associated with “modernity,” such as the agricultural revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and increased globalization; protests against polio vaccination in Northern Nigeria; smallpox eradication practices in India; the epidemiology of yellow fever in Brazil; the origins of AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa; and current vaccine anxieties in the United Kingdom.

We’ll also review the impact of factors more commonly associated with “modernity,” such as the agricultural revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and increased globalization.