Winter 2020 Course Descriptions

HC 209H/PHYS 199: Science as Discovery

Professor: Greg Bothun

4.00 credits

• CRN 26420: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 – 17:50 @ B040 PSC

Course listing here

This course will fulfill HC 209H Science and is open to Clark Honors College students only.

Science is a discovery process that is largely driven by measurements, observations and guessing.   The class will be high in activity-based learning as the goal is for students to duplicate the scientific process via various forms of relevant measurement.  Read more


HC 209H: Discovery of Fundamental Particles and Interactions

Professor:  Chris Potter

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22743: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ GSH 103

We will discuss the discovery of fundamental particles, of which we are all made, from a historical perspective. We will start with atoms, their nuclei and the quarks which make up nuclei. Next we will focus on the forces between those particles, mediated by particles like the photon, the particle of light. We'll conclude with the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson, the elusive particle which explains how all of these particles got their mass, at the Large Hadron Collider.


HC 209H: The Science of Learning & Memory

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22744: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 1:30 @ CON 203

Our memories shape our identities and give meaning to our lives, yet they are not always as reliable as we would like.  In this course, we will explore the successes and failures of our memories by examining key concepts, theories, and methodological approaches for studying human learning and memory. Read More


HC 209H: The Story of Life: An introduction to Biology

Professor: Rachel Rodman

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26276: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ GSH 117

In this course, we will trace the story of life: when it began, and how it changed, over billions of years, to give rise to everything that has ever lived, from bacteria to pineapples to mushrooms to turtles to people. Read More


HC 222H: The Velocity of Gesture or, Intro to Air Guitar

Professor: Brian McWhorter

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22745: Wednesday & Friday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202

As a phenomenological exploration of nuance and gesture, this class will look at body language in casual and performative modalities. We will explore how body language reflects and even engenders the understanding of music and other temporal art forms.


HC 222H: History of Black Americans In/On Television

Professor: Dayna Chatman

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22747: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 202

In the last decade, shows featuring Black American characters and casts—such as Scandal, Black-ish, and Empire—have been successful in drawing in diverse audiences. Many of these popular shows are helmed by showrunners of color who are opening doors for tv writers and producers who lacked access to the industry. Read More


HC 222H: Invisible Landscapes: Space and Place

Professor: Liska Chan

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22748: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ GSH 103

The goal of this course is to explore the relationship between the visual and non-visual qualities of the landscape. The student work will center around methods of apprehending and disclosing aspects of landscape that are not immediately perceptible. Read More


HC 222H: The Literary Lives of Animals

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22749: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ CHA 202

• CRN 22751: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ CHA 202

“I often ask myself, just to see, who I am—and who I am (following) at the moment when, caught naked, in silence, by the gaze of an animal, for example, the eyes of a cat, I have trouble, yes, a bad time overcoming my embarrassment.” Read More


HC 222H: In Search of Belonging: The Consolation of Community in Contemporary Literature and Cinema

Professor: Dawn Marlan

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22750: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ GSH 103

This is a course focused on the paradox of community, namely that the very safety and protection it offers (by virtue of strength in numbers, for example) poses a danger to the individual, whose freedom it curtails and whose interests are never perfectly aligned with those of the group. Read More


HC 222H: On Nonviolence

Professor:  Edgar Temam

4 Credits

• CRN 22752: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00 - 5:20 @ CHA 201

The philosophy of nonviolence offers us an alternative set of perspectives on the human condition in general and in particular on various phenomena that can be conceptualized as forms of violence. In this course on the philosophy of nonviolence, we critically examine the conceptual, theoretical, and practical frameworks of views on nonviolence as well as the assumptive contexts that underlie these views. Read More


HC 222H: Into the Strange New World: Ethics through Science Fiction

Professor: Caroline Lundquist

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22753: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CON 104

Today, as in the past, our technology often outpaces our ethics. Before we are able to imagine much less address the moral consequences of the latest scientific discovery or technological innovation, we find it is already reshaping our lives in ethically-significant ways. Read More


HC 222H: Mythos & Ethos II: Modernity & Meaning

Professor: Kimberley Parzuchowski

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22756: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ CHA 201

This course will explore themes of Imperialism, Classism, & Alienation in Western Modernity & Post-Modern Thought. In this course, we will be engaging in what Marshal Gregory calls ethical criticism of the literature and philosophy of this era. Read More


HC 222H: African American Poetry and Poetics

Professor: Corbett Upton

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22757: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ MCK 123

This course will explore a wide variety of African American poetry and statements on poetics from the colonial period to the present. We will consider the politics of poetic form and identity with an emphasis on the debates about the relationship of national and racial identity to poetic form that have shaped and continue to shape African-American poetry in the United States. Read More


HC 222H: Evolution and the Modern

Professor: Suzanne Clark

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22758: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00 - 5:50 @ CHA 202

The Origin of Species, published by Darwin in 1859, caused an immediate sensation.  It marked a turning point, not only in science.  It changed the ways we talk about humans, animals, progress, and all of life. Arguments continue to be fierce. Yet Darwin started simply, writing observations of natural history. Read More


HC 222H: "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead": Narratives of Retribution and Revenge

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26454: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ PLC 361

Focused on both narrative readings (mostly poetry, drama, and short fiction) and films, this section of HC 222 concerns how different cultures, over time, have examined through narrative the mechanics, potentialities, limitations, and consequences of retribution and revenge. Read More


HC 222H: True Fiction

Professor: Brendan O’Kelly

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26455: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ MCK 122

Ever since The Blair Witch Project (1999) was marketed as “found footage” documenting the last few days of missing—and presumably dead—film students, the horror genre has been barraged by films pretending to be discovered footage of actual events. These films have been so popular that the “found footage” style has appeared in a wide range of genres, from police procedural and science-fiction to romantic comedy. Read More

 


HC 222H: Trans* and Cinema

Professor:  Allison McGuffie

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26456: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 1:50 @ CON 301

Trans* and Cinema traces the history and present of transgender representations in cinema and new media. Covering films from Rocky Horror Picture Show to Paris is Burning to Transfinite, this course considers the importance of how marginalized genders appear on screen. Students will be introduced to the foundations of gender theory and film analysis and take a deep dive into the newest contributions of transgender media studies.


HC 222H: The City: Classical Athens, Renaissance Florence and 20th Century Berlin

Professor: John Nicols

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26457: Wednesday & Friday, 12:00 - 1:50 @ GSH 103

Cities have traditionally been the catalyst to political, cultural, scientific and economic development. In this course, we will look at the experiences of three cities. Read More


HC 222H: Eco Literature and the Green Imagination

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26441: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ CHA 202

Mary Oliver has Instructions for Living a Life: Pay attention. Be astonished. Tell someone. Our class takes these instructions to heart, as we study calls to consciousness and conscience about our environment and living world—how we tell about itRead More


HC 222H: Displacements

Professor: Mai-lin Cheng

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22746: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201

• CRN 22754: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ CHA 201

This course explores the journey as theme and metaphor, as well as reading itself as a journey through—among other things—space, time, form, and identity. As we navigate through the readings, we will encounter questions about self and other, the real and the fictional, the historical and the fantastic. Students should be prepared to read closely and to engage with challenging and surprising texts. Readings to include: Othello by William Shakespeare; Dracula by Bram Stoker, Kindred by Octavia Butler; Exit West by Mohsin Hamid; Dictee by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha. 


HC 232H: Slavery: How American Slaves Saw It

Professor: Stephen G. Rabe

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22759: Monday, 2:00 - 4:50 @ CHA 202

This class in seminar format will examine the development, evolution, and destruction of slavery in America from 1619 to 1865.  Through lectures, discussions, and audiovisual material, we will examine the meaning of slavery to the development of American society and its impact on racial relations in the United States in the post-1865 era. Read More


HC 232H: Mental Illness in Modern and Contemporary U.S. Memoirs

Professor: Shoshana D. Kerewsky

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22760: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30 - 9:50 @ CHA 202

• CRN 22768: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ PLC 248

This course primarily uses memoirs and autobiographically-informed fiction to explore the experiences of people with mental illness diagnoses from the inception of modern diagnostic categories through the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. Read More


HC 232H: Consumerism and the Environment

Professor: Martin Galen

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22761: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ CHA 301

Within the current world economy, great disparities between rich and poor persist.  A relatively small percentage of the human population has access to a highly disproportionate share of natural resources, capital, information, and technology. As participants in the world’s largest economy we are part of a small percentage of the human population that has access to a highly disproportionate share of natural resources, capital, information, and technology. Read More


HC 232H: Spaces of Modernity

Professor:  Daniel Rosenberg

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22765: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201

• CRN 22762: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ CHA 201

It is often said that today we live in a global village in which technologies, including those of communication and transportation, have diminished the importance of geographical distance. But what does this kind of generalization actually mean? How have spatial practices changed since early modernity? And what are the implications of this change? This course examines the emergence of modern social, cultural, and intellectual forms from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries through their articulation in space. Read More


HC 232H: Women and Gender in Modern Europe

Professor: Emily Gilkey

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22763: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ PETR 105

• CRN 22767: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ GER 301

In 1500, women had limited rights to property and were by law subject to their male kin. Access to work opportunities was extremely limited and, with a few notable exceptions, women played no role in government. Today, women lead several of Europe’s major powers and enjoy legal parity with men in most respects. Read More


HC 232H: Democracy and Its Critics

Professor:  Noah Eber-Schmid

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22766: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301

• CRN 22764: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ CHA 301

At its most basic level, democracy can be understood as the “rule of the people,” but what does that mean? What is “democracy?” This question is important in any age, but it is especially crucial in our own day of rising interest in antidemocratic politics and popular doubts about the value and viability of American democracy. Read More


HC 232H: Deportation from the United States

Professor:  Tobin Hansen

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22769: Monday & Wednesday, 8:30 - 9:50 @ CHA 202

• CRN 26452: Monday & Wednesday, 4:00 - 5:20 @ CHA 201

This course explores exclusion and deportation from the United States in historical and contemporary social and political context. Our examination of the logics of and mechanisms for expelling “undesirable” populations will provide an entrée into three central inquiries: Who belongs? How is belonging regulated? And, what are the consequences of expulsion? Read  More


HC 232H: Environment Alteration in an Age of Fossil Fuels

Professor:  Nick Kohler

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26451: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ MCK 473

Since the late 1700s the scale and reach of human-caused environmental alteration has increased substantially, driven by a variety of trends: technological developments, new types of economic and cultural configurations, globalized trade, etc. Fossil fuels - oil, gas, coal - have provided the energy (and material) resources that helped make these trends possible. Read More


HC 232H: Oral Argument and Advocacy

Professor:  Trond Jacobson

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26453: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00 - 5:20 @ CHA 301

Speaking in public remains one of most consistent fears of Americans, including college-age students. This course teaches students the foundations of effective public speaking, the properties and structures that make arguments strong or weak, and the strategies and techniques that make speakers persuasive when engaging varied audiences. Read More


HC 408H : Thesis Orientation

Professor: Timothy Williams

1.00 Credits

• CRN 22775: Saturday 01/25/20 ONLY, 11:00 - 3:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.

Food and refreshments will be provided.  


HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

1.00 Credits

• CRN 22776: Thursday 01/16/20 ONLY, 5:00 - 9:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.

Food and refreshments will be provided.  


HC 421H: Emerson & Einstein, Interdisciplinary Artist Activists: An Inquiry into Genius

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22778: Wednesday, 2:00 - 4:50 @ CHA 202

Poetry and science merge, converge, blur, and blend in this study of genius that rocked—and still rocks—our world. Bursting and bending disciplines, joyously defying definitions of field--Einstein the scientist playing the violin and encouraging humanities, Emerson the poet urging study of science and history. Read More


HC 421H: The Aesthetics of Anxiety in the Modernist Moment

Professor: Jeffrey Librett

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22779: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 1:20 @ CHA 301

This course provides an introduction to some of the most innovative, demanding, and interesting modernist writers in the German-Austrian and the Anglo-American traditions.  Our theme is "anxiety," one of the most pressing topics in the literature, art, psychology and philosophy of the twentieth century. Read More


HC 421H: Literature & Philosophy

Professor: James Crosswhite

4.00 Credits

CRN 22780: Monday & Wednesday, 4:00 - 5:20 @ CHA 201

What is philosophy, and why does it take the form of writing and literature? What is literature, and how does it carry out the work of philosophy? In this course, we will explore and engage with the ways these questions have been developed and answered in some major philosophical and literary works. Read More


HC 434H/421H: The Jewish Diaspora in Latin America

Professor: Monique Balbuena

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26459: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CON 301

Did you know that:

New Christians or Crypto-Jews were among the first Europeans to set foot in Latin America? Jews were roughly 10% of the “desaparecidos” (“disappeared”) in Argentina? Jews were central to the development of the Tango music and the radio and record industries? Buenos Aires was one of the world centers of Yiddish publishing?  There are Latino Jews?   Read More

 


 

HC 434H/421H: Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic and Cynical Tales

Professor:  Dorothee Ostmeier

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26758: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ CHA 301

Crossing cultural and genre boundaries, fairy and fantasy tales have always been vibrant sources for revisions and exploration of controversial issues, as for example, questions of aesthetic utopias, class and gender struggles, child abuse, civil rights etc. We will study the cross-cultural connections between popular fairy tales and their revisions in various contemporary media. Read More


HC 434H/431H: Inside Out Prison Exchange: Water, Climate, and Environmental Justice

Professor:  Mark Carey

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26660: Wednesday, 6:00 - 8:50 @ Salem OSP

• Tuesday, January 7 ONLY, 5:00 - 7:50 @ CHA 101

How are environmental issues -- and particularly water issues related to climate change -- experienced, understood, studied, and managed in different ways depending on race, class, and gender? How are environmental impacts unevenly distributed? Who produces the knowledge to grapple with climate change and water stresses -- and who doesn't? Read More


HC 441H: Mysteries of the Brain: Neuroscience and Society

Professor: Nathan Tublitz

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22785: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201

This course provides science and non-science HC students with a basic understanding of neuroscience, the study of the brain. Students acquire an understanding of the complexities underlying brain function, learn about the methods and fundamental processes underlying scientific research, gain an appreciation of the role and limitations of basic biomedical research in our society, and explore ethical dilemmas in neuroscience research. Read More


HC 441H: Neuroethics

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22786: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ CHA 201

Over the past few decades, technological advances in human neuroscience research have progressed our understanding of the human brain.  At the same time, these advances have highlighted the potential implications and applications of neuroscience research for society and have raised many ethical questions. Read More


HC 441H: The Necessity for New Numbers

Professor:  Chris Sinclair

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22787: Monday & Wednesday, 2:00 - 3:20 @ VIL 201

The counting, or natural, numbers seem pretty fundamental to the nature of the universe. The rational numbers, or fractions, arise fairly naturally too, since some things humans might count—like apples—can be divided and one might sensibly need to capture the idea of ‘two and a half apples’. But there are far more numbers/quantities/measurements that we might want to capture than can be accommodated by the rationals. Read More


HC 441H: The Mystique of Marine Mammals in History, Science and Culture

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 Credits

• CRN 27116: Monday & Wednesday, 8:30 - 9:50 @ CHA 201

Marine mammals (whales, dolphins, seals, and others) occupy a special place in the human psyche. Throughout history, we have hunted, feared, and revered our sea-dwelling mammalian relatives. Read More


HC 441H: Who Am I? A Genetic Inquiry

Professor: Amy Connolly

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22789: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ GSH 103

“Who Am I?” You may have asked yourself this question repeatedly in your life, and found a myriad of ways to answer it. In this class, we will be looking at how commercially available services like 23andMe answer this question by looking at your genes. For $200, 23andMe extracts DNA from your saliva, and gives you information about your traits, health and ancestry. Read More


HC 441H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Public Science

Professor:  Dare Baldwin

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22788: Wednesday, 9:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 101

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. These seminars will have a collaborative format, with students writing frequently and rewriting their work in response to comments by their professors and input from classmates. You have learned how to write for college, now learn how to write for life.

Scientific practices are currently undergoing radical change. Among other things, such changes alter best practice in scientific communication. One key source of changes that are afoot lies in growing recognition that many, and possibly even most, reported scientific findings are not reproducible. Read More


HC 444H/431H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: A House Divided – The U.S. in the 1860s

Professor:  Timothy Williams

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22790: Thursday, 2:00 - 4:50 @ CHA 101

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. These seminars will have a collaborative format, with students writing frequently and rewriting their work in response to comments by their professors and input from classmates. You have learned how to write for college, now learn how to write for life.

The 1860s were among the most tumultuous years in the history of the United States. Stories—true and untrue—about the era abound in American culture, which has marveled for more than 150 years over a war that turned brother against brother. Given the popular fascination with this decade of Read More 


HC 444H/431H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: Communicating for Social Justice

Professor: Carol Stabile

4.00 Credits

• CRN 22791: Friday, 12:00 - 2:50 @ CHA 102

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. These seminars will have a collaborative format, with students writing frequently and rewriting their work in response to comments by their professors and input from classmates. You have learned how to write for college, now learn how to write for life.

“If libraries hold all the stories that have been told, there are ghost libraries of all the stories that have not. The ghosts outnumber the books by some unimaginably vast sum,” author Rebecca Solnit writes in The Mother of All Questions. Read More


HC 444H/431H: Calderwood Seminars Public Writing: The Justice System Today

Professor: Michael Moffitt

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26680: Friday, 9:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 102

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience— which is a central feature of a liberal arts education. These seminars will have a collaborative format, with students writing frequently and rewriting their work in response to comments by their professors and input from classmates. You have learned how to write for college, now learn how to write for life.

Courts’ decisions shape most of the political, economic, and social policies at the core of modern life in the United States. Courts often speak in a highly stylized language, leaving others to interpret and communicate the implications of its decisions. No single lens provides a dispositive perspective on the judiciary. Read More


HC 444H/431H: Reacting to the Past: Native Nations

Professor: Kevin Hatfield

4.00 Credits

• CRN 26654: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00 - 5:50 @ BEAN 1201

The Reacting to the Past (RTTP) curriculum invites students to engage history by immersing themselves into elaborate role-playing games.  The roles enacted by students are not didactic simulations or scripted performances, but instead an active and extemporaneous participation in historical processes within a plausible context underpinned by original sources and contextual knowledge. Read More


HC 477H : Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Monique Balbuena

2.00 Credits

• CRN 22792: Friday, 9:00 - 10:50 @ CHA 101

• CRN 22793: Tuesday, 12:00 - 1:50 @ CHA 101

This class guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with their Primary Thesis Advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a final Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Read More


HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: David Frank

2.00 Credits

• CRN 26458: Monday, 12:00 - 1:50 @ CHA 101

This class guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with their Primary Thesis Advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a final Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Read More