Winter 2018 Course Descriptions

Winter 2018 HC 207H: 21st Century Science

Professor: James Schombert

4 credits

•  CRN 23249: Monday & Wednesday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 202
•  CRN 23250: Friday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ WIL 13 (Required Lab)

The 21st century is positioned to be a turning point in scientific knowledge and technological progress. This course will explore topics in three divisions of Nature; the macroscopic world, microscopic world and cosmology. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 209H: Decision Making for Sustainability

Professor: Kenneth Doxsee

4 credits

•  CRN 23251: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 202

This course will provide students with the broad scientific and behavioral knowledge needed to make informed decisions and engage in thoughtful discourse about various contemporary issues in the realm of sustainability. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Comedy and Satire

Professor: Corinne Bayerl

4 credits

•  CRN 23253: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301

How did we end up with our current perception of comedy as harmless entertainment, and of satire as a form of political activism? This seminar will explore how writers and filmmakers have used comedy and satire as a weapon, resorting to irony and laughter in order to address serious problems in their societies. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Eco Literature

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4 credits

•  CRN 23256: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

Homer sang it, Aesop fabled it, Shakespeare sonneted it, Milton made it epic, Wordsworth gave us our words’ worth: since Gilgamesh scratched it on clay in cuneiform in 2700 BCE, eco-literature is a dynamic portrait of human engagement and concern with our world. Whether expressed in joy, gratitude, anger, or sorrow, what is at stake in how we represent earth and understand our relation to it? Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Ecopoetry

Professor: John Witte

4 credits

•  CRN 23262: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 13:00 - 13:50 @ GSH 103

Nature poetry has in recent years been revitalized by a widespread ecological awakening. Our class will investigate the links between poetry and environmentalism, and explore the various ways that nature has been represented in English and American verse. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Evolution and the Modern

Professor: Suzanne Clark

4 credits

•  CRN 23260: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:50 @ CHA 202

The Origin of Species, published by Darwin in 1859, caused an immediate sensation. It has been changing the way we talk about the relationships of humans, animals and all of life ever since. This class will focus not on contemporary evolutionary science, but on the turn of the 20th century (19th/20th) when the impact of evolution was dramatic. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Island Writing

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

4 credits

•  CRN 23255: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202
•  CRN 23261: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202

This course examines the mythic status of the island in a range of literary and visual texts. As we map the poetic and political space of the island, we will encounter questions about exploration and empire, self and other, the real and the imaginary. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Literary Gestations: Pregnancy and Childbirth in Poetry and Prose

Professor: Elizabeth Raisanen

4 credits

•  CRN 23263: Wednesday & Friday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 201

This course investigates pregnancy and childbirth in poetry and prose from the early modern era to the present in order to explore the ways in which literary representations of maternal bodily processes have changed with the development of the medical fields of obstetrics and gynecology. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Loose and Baggy Monsters: Russian Novels of the Nineteenth Century (Crime and Punishment and Anna Karenina)

Professor: Susanna Lim

4 credits

•  CRN 23252: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201
•  CRN 23259: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 201

This course is devoted to the reading and analysis of two of world literature’s most famous literary “monsters”: Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment (1866) and Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1877). What was it about these stories of a university drop-out-turned-axe murderer (Crime and Punishment) and high society adulteress (Anna Karenina) that struck readers of the time, and which continue to attract readers today? Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: Science and the Cultural Imagination: Faustus to Ex Machina

Professor: Rebecca Lindner

4 credits

•  CRN 23254: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ GSH 130

This course will explore the relationships between scientific enquiry and cultural imagination. We will consider the ways in which imaginative literature in particular, but also art, cinema, television, and news media, address scientific discoveries, events, and ideas. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 222H: The Mystery You're Investigating May Be Your Own

Professor: Casey Shoop

4 credits

•  CRN 23257: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 301
•  CRN 23258: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 301

This course explores a range of literary and cinematic works in which protagonists, narrators, and even readers/viewers find themselves caught up in plots beyond their understanding. If one traditional convention of the detective genre entails a central character who solves the mystery through the sheer power of his/her reason to order the clues into a coherent account of ‘whodunit,’ the texts in this course offer no such clear resolution nor any agent capable of standing outside of the mystery and verifying its final meaning. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Mapping Modernities: Geography, Commerce, and Science/Technology, 1500-present

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

4 credits

•  CRN 23276: Wednesday & Friday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 301

The world after 1500 was a multiplicity of societies interconnected by conditions that followed in the wake of the Mongol empire (1206-1368).  Against the backdrop of an expanding awareness of world geography, commerce, and technology, centers in Anatolia, Prussia, Manchuria, and Kerala among others negotiated new terms of interdependence. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Historical Thinking in a Global Framework, 1350-Present

Professor: Joseph Fracchia

4 credits

•  CRN 23271: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202

In the beginning of that century near whose end Columbus crossed the Atlantic, the Chinese admiral Zheng made seven major voyages throughout the South Pacific and across the Indian Ocean to the thriving trade centers on Africa’s east coast.  His fleet consisted of 62 ships, most of which were so large that Columbus’s entire fleet of three ships could easily fit on their decks. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Architecture and Urbanism in the Modern World

Professor: Ocean Howell

4 credits

•  CRN 23269: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202
•  CRN 23274: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202

This course will examine society and culture of the modern world through the study of architecture and urbanism. In order to account for changes to the ordering of physical space, one must account for changes to the ordering of the broader society. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Disease, Public Health, and the Making of the Modern World

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

4 credits

•  CRN 23272: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301
•  CRN 23264: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 301

This class examines the emergence of modern debates about health and disease and practices of public health in order to gain insight into the larger social, cultural, and political history of the modern world. The class will be broad in geographical and chronological scope. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Exploration, Encounter and Consequence

Professor: Michael Furtado

4 credits

•  CRN 23270: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201

What motivates people to embark on journeys into the unknown? What happens when one civilization encounters an unknown or alien culture? In this course, we will discuss the motives for exploration, including economics, the quest for knowledge, military considerations, and the consequences of such efforts ranging from the discovery of the New World in 1492 to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Holy War: From the Crusades to ISIS

Professor: Jeff Schroeder

4 credits

•  CRN 23273: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ GSH 103

How do religious teachings of love and non-violence become sources of war and violence? Are certain religions more violent than others? Is religious violence caused by non-religious factors? How does religious violence relate to other forms of violence such as state violence? Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Muslims in the U.S.

Professor: Irum Shiekh

4 credits

•  CRN 23266: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 202

This course examines the histories and identities of Muslims living in the United States. We will begin this course with the historical migration of Muslims into the US starting from the slavery period. Afterwards, the course will study their patterns of settlement and the formations of various ethnic and cultural groups over time. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Nationalism and Regionalism in U.S. History

Professor: Tim Williams

4 credits

•  CRN 23265: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202

The 2016 national election cycle showcased, dramatically at times, competing visions for the meaning of the American nation and citizenship. In order to understand these complex, competing, and often painfully ahistorical visions, we must consider their origins from a scholarly perspective. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Spaces of Modernity

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

4 credits

•  CRN 23267: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201
•  CRN 23268: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

It is often said that we live in a global village, that today the importance of geographical distance is diminished, that we are truly now one world. But what do these generalities mean? What is modern space and how have spatial practices changed in modernity? Read more


Winter 2018 HC 232H: Women, Gender and Society in Modern Europe

Professor: Emily Gilkey

4 credits

•  CRN 23275: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 301

In 1500, women had limited rights to property and were by law subject to their male kin. Today, women lead several of Europe’s major powers and enjoy legal parity with men in most respects. We will explore the gendered impact of key historical events including the Reformation, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution and the two World Wars from the bottom up, studying them in terms of everyday lived experiences. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 399H: Critical Argumentation and Scholarship

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

1 - 5 credits

•  CRN 23277: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ 102 Chapman Hall

This course prepares students to better form, present, critique and defend arguments before academic audiences. Students finishing the course understand and apply elements that influence the effectiveness of arguments delivered orally in academic contexts through a combination of lectures, readings, and intensive practice, preparation, and faculty and peer feedback. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: TBA

1 credit

CRN 23283: Thursday 1/18, 17:00 - 21:50 @ FEN 119CRN 23282: Saturday 1/27, 11:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 301

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 421H: Getting Medieval

Professor: Louise Bishop

4 credits

•  CRN 23285: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ GSH 103

What is “medieval”? The word anglicizes Latin medium aevum and comes into common usage in the nineteenth century, replacing the previously-used term “Gothic.” Why the change? Read more


Winter 2018 HC 421H: Literature and Philosophy

Professor: James Crosswhite

4 credits

•  CRN 26903: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ 106 Friendly Hall

What is philosophy, and why does it take the form of writing and literature? What is literature, and how does it carry out the work of philosophy? In this course, we will explore and engage with the ways these questions have been developed and answered in some major philosophical and literary works. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 421H: War and Peace and Totality and Infinity: Tolstoy and Levinas

Professor: Steven Shankman

4 credits

•  CRN 23286: Tuesday, 18:00 - 20:50 @ Oregon State Penitentiary Salem

This is an Inside-Out class: half the students (“inside” students) are prison inmates and the other half are University of Oregon students (“outside” students).

In our time of seemingly endless wars, we will read one of the world’s greatest war novels, Tolstoy’s massive War and Peace. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 424H/421H: The Rhetoric of Racial Reconciliation

Professor: David Frank

4 credits

•  CRN 23288: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ GSH 103

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an IP (Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

This course centers on the rhetoric of race, adaptive racism, adaptive anti-racism, and racial reconciliation.  Drawing from the theories of intersectionality, the course is designed to study the rhetoric of race, adaptive racism, adaptive anti-racism for the purpose of creating the mythic and symbolic anchors for racial reconciliation. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 434H/421H: Art and Film in Urban China

Professor: Jenny Lin

4 credits

•  CRN 26904: Friday, 10:00 - 12:50 @ CHA 202

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts and Letters Colloquium and an IC (International Cultures) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts and Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Over the past two decades, Chinese cities have grown at breakneck speed, emerging as global centers of finance and culture. This course explores the intersections between China’s fast-past urbanization and contemporary art and film. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 434H/421H: The City

Professor: John Nicols

4 credits

•  CRN 26902: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ ESL 199

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts and Letters Colloquium and an IC (International Cultures) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts and Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Cities have traditionally been the catalyst to political, cultural, scientific and economic development. In this course, we look at the experiences of three cities. Ancient Athens set the standard in the Western Tradition for high cultural achievement, and defined the “classical.” Read more


Winter 2018 HC 424H/431H: Autobiography as Political Agency

Professor: Anita Chari

4 credits

•  CRN 23287: Monday, 18:00 - 20:50 @ Oregon State Correctional Institution in Salem

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an IP (Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Sceince Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

This course is part of the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program, and open only to CHC students. Half the students (“inside” students) are prison inmates and the other half are University of Oregon students (“outside” students).

This class explores the autobiography as a form of both personal and political expression. The class begins by complicating, questioning and demystifying the divide between the personal and political by linking students' personal stories and histories with narratives of broader social structures, such as capitalism, patriarchy, slavery, and colonialism. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 431H: Bodies and Artifacts

Professor: Joseph Fracchia

4 credits

•  CRN 23289: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:50 @ CHA 301

In a statement with which his contemporary Charles Darwin certainly would have agreed, Karl Marx noted in an offhand comment that ‘the first fact to be established for the study of history is the corporeal organization of human beings.’ Read more


Winter 2018 HC 431H: Economics

Professor: Glen Waddell

4 credits

•  CRN 26867: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 201

“The theory of economics does not furnish a body of settled conclusions immediately applicable to policy. It is a method rather than a doctrine, an apparatus of the mind, a technique of thinking which helps its possessor to draw correct conclusions." – Keynes. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 431H: Historical Archaeology & Preservation

Professor: Rick Minor

4 credits

•  CRN 26868: Monday, 15:00 - 17:50 @ STB 254

Historical archaeology and historic preservation are two fields of study linked together by common interests in the identification, documentation, interpretation, and preservation of heritage resources. Historical archaeologists seek to contribute to an understanding of the emergence of the Modern World. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 434H/431H: Global History of Color, 1400-1900

Professor: Vera Keller

4 credits

•  CRN 23290: Monday, 14:00 - 16:50 @ GSH 131

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an IC (International Cultures) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Bringing together art history, material culture, the history of the book, economic history, and the history of science, this course will use color as a lens for studying cultural, scientific, and commercial interchange in the early modern world. We will focus on a range of natural reds and the first synthetic dye, mauve. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 441H: Biology and Politics

Professor: Gabriel Yospin

4 credits

•  CRN 23292: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ GSH 130

Scientific information plays a major role in nearly every government policy decision. In many instances, science becomes a part of policy with minimal discussion. At other times, the role of science in policy decisions is controversial. How should scientific information be a part of policy decisions? Read more


Winter 2018 HC 441H: Journey through Genius: The Great Theorems of Mathematics

Professor: Shlomo Libeskind

4 credits

•  CRN 23295: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ MCK 473

This seminar is a journey through two millennia of mathematical milestones, exploring their historical settings. We will emphasize that proofs and solutions to problems don’t come “out of the blue” and discuss the thinking process leading to a proof or solution and its historical background. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 441H: Mysteries of the Brain: Neuroscience and Society

Professor: Nathan Tublitz

4 credits

•  CRN 23291: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201

This course provides science and non-science students with a basic understanding of neuroscience, the study of the brain. Students acquire an understanding of the complexities underlying brain function, learn about the methods and fundamental processes underlying scientific research, gain an appreciation of the role and limitations of basic biomedical research in our society, and explore ethical dilemmas in neuroscience research. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 441H: Who Am I? A Genetic Inquiry

Professor: Amy Connolly

4 credits

•  CRN 23293: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ GSH 103

“Who Am I?” You may have asked yourself this question repeatedly in your life, and found a myriad of ways to answer it. In this class, we will be looking at how commercially available services like 23andMe answer this question by looking at your genes. Read more


Winter 2018 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

2 credits

•  CRN 23299: Tuesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101
•  CRN 26866: Thursday, 16:00 - 18:00 @ CHA 101 

In order to provide students support to develop a rigorous thesis, and to enjoy the process as the culmination of your undergraduate career, we have structured a real-world process in which to develop a prospectus and to model the public oral thesis defense presentation and follow-up questions that will be a key factor in the student’s evaluation by the faculty committee. Read more