Fall 2016 Course Descriptions

How Marine Organisms Work

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 207H 4 Credits

CRN 12723 1000 - 1150 TR PETR 102

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

Important note: This is a lab course that includes TWO MANDATORY field trips scheduled for Oct. 8 and 9 (Overnight trip to OIMB) and Nov. 12 (Day trip to Bob Creek).

A beautiful and stunning diversity of organisms live beneath the ocean’s surface along the Oregon coast.  How do these organisms perform and ultimately, survive, in the marine environment?  In this course we use a biomechanics approach (study of biological solids and fluids) to understand how body shape, material properties and movement influence interactions with the physical environment and with other organisms.  We will focus at the organism-scale and, in particular, on interactions with the fluid environment (e.g. how water movement influences predation).   Through field trips, laboratory studies, discussions and team projects we will become familiar with local marine organisms and use quantitative tools to understand organism performance and adaptation.

Hands on with the Internet of Things

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 207H 4 Credits

CRN 12724 1000-1120 MW DES 220
CRN 12725 1000-1050 (Lab) F DES 220

Professor: Stephen Fickas

Be sure to register for both CRN 12724 & 12725 (Lab)

Note:  Students are required to bring a laptop to class. All other hardware is supplied by the instructor.

The term the Internet of Things refers to the proliferation of computers into every nook and cranny of daily life. Your car has them, your home has them, your pet could have one, medical devices have them, buildings have them, factories have them, and your phone is one. These devices live on the Internet, the same Internet where you find YouTube, Amazon, etc. This course explores what this means in a hands-on fashion. Each student will be given a small computer (a Raspberry PI) to program. Groups will form to link their computers up to do some cool things. And then the instructor will play the bad guy and try to crash students' computers just as seen in today's headlines.

The course does not assume prior programming experience. The language we use in the class is Python. You will learn the bits of Python needed to program your Raspberry PIs and to link them up with other student's PIs. As the instructor starts to attack your network of PIs, you come up with ways of thwarting him.

The class uses a "flipped" style that uses class time for working on examples and problems. Students will need access to a laptop in class to follow along. This course is ideal for students who have no previous programming experience.

Students can get a glimps of the course by reading the online Cascade Magazine through this link: http://digital.turn-page.com/i/643008-cascade-winter-2016

Sacred Texts: The Bible and The Quran In Literature and Film

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12726 0830-0950 TR MAC
CRN 12731 1000-1120 TR MAC

Professor: Susanna Lim

This course focuses on two texts that have not only been central to the development of ancient civilization, but whose influences are felt well into our modern age: the Bible and the Quran (Koran). Taking these two works as starting points, we will explore how the narrative elements, characters, images, and ideas of these sacred texts have shaped literary and cultural texts from the medieval period to our modern age.

Our reading list will include passages from Genesis and Job (Hebrew Bible) and the Gospels of Matthew and Luke (New Testament), "Inferno" from Dante's Divine Comedy, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Evgeny Zamyatin’s We, passages from the Quran, selections from One Thousand and One Nights, Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and Arabian Nights and Days by the Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz. We will also be considering films and literary criticism in relation to the topics in discussion.

Sacred Texts: The Bible and The Quran In Literature and Film

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12727 0830-0950 MW MAC

Professor: Susanna Lim

This course focuses on two texts that have not only been central to the development of ancient civilization, but whose influences are felt well into our modern age: the Bible and the Quran (Koran). Taking these two works as starting points, we will explore how the narrative elements, characters, images, and ideas of these sacred texts have shaped literary and cultural texts from the medieval period to our modern age.

Our reading list will include passages from Genesis and Job (Hebrew Bible) and the Gospels of Matthew and Luke (New Testament), "Inferno" from Dante's Divine Comedy, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Evgeny Zamyatin’s We, passages from the Quran, selections from One Thousand and One Nights, Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and Arabian Nights and Days by the Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz. We will also be considering films and literary criticism in relation to the topics in discussion.

Copycats! Tradition and Originality in Western Literature

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12728 0830-0950 TR MAC

Professor: Sander Goldberg

We are taught to value originality in literature, but even the greatest of western authors have for millennia begged, borrowed, and stolen from their predecessors. The resulting debts may be tacit or overt, buried deep within the creative process or shouted from the rooftops, but scratch the surface of even quite famous works and you often find the remains of some predecessor. Why is that? What does it mean for the creative process that works of literature look back to earlier works? How does the aggregate of such debts create what we call a tradition, and how does the fact of tradition shape the work of writers and the experience of readers?

This course will focus on texts with demonstrable debts to earlier texts and examine what later authors achieved by their borrowing, echoes, and appropriations. It will also consider what literary critics have said about the role of tradition in the making of literature.

Tentative Readings: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey (extracts) together with Vergil’s Aeneid and Derek Walcott’s Omeros, Plautus’ Menaechmus Twins and Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors, together with a set of modern but classically inspired poems by W. H. Auden, Louis McNeice, and others. Secondary readings will include essays by T.S. Eliot, Stanley Fish, and Harold Bloom.

Assignments will include weekly response papers, group reports, brief quizzes, and a final essay project.

The Tragic Mode of Knowledge

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12730 1000 - 1120 TR MAC
CRN 12737 1400 - 1520 TR MAC

Professor: Casey Shoop

How can it be that seeing the pain of others constitutes a form of knowledge? What does it mean, in the words of Gloucester in King Lear, to “see it feelingly”?  From Aristotle to the present, tragedy is an aesthetic form that seeks to pose, interrogate and answer this question of what we learn from the dramatization of human suffering.

This course explores tragedy’s beginnings in 5th-century BC Athens where the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides help to constitute the democratic polity while simultaneously interrogating the extent to which that polity has realized those democratic principles. We move from these philosophical beginnings of tragedy as a form of civic reckoning to the early modern plays of Shakespeare lonely sovereigns to the modernist emptying out of tragic meaning altogether in the plays of Samuel Beckett and Bertolt Brecht to the reinvestment in tragic knowledge in the domestic dramas of Eugene O’Neill and August Wilson.

As we contextualize these works in historical time and place, we will also pose some of the philosophical questions that have persisted since tragedy’s inception: What are the ethics and politics at stake in the representation of violence and suffering? How do the particular trials of an individual character relate to the larger social collectivity?

What does it mean to experience emotional release or catharsis when we—in Susan Sontag’s words—“regard the pain of others”? Does the nature of tragedy change through historical time or remain relatively constant in its representation of human suffering? Does tragedy offer a different conception of the human, the animal and the thing? Finally, does art have the power to contain and perhaps even redeem the very pain it puts before our eyes?

Texts may include those written by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Racine, Ibsen, Chekov, Brecht, O’Neill, Williams, Wilson, Baraka, Deavere Smith, Kushner and many others. We will also read philosophical texts on tragedy by Aristotle, Schiller, Hegel, Nietzsche, Williams, Steiner, among others.

Epic and Leadership

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12733 1000-1120 MW MAC

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

In the woods, on the wine dark seas, following the yellow brick road-- witches and monsters and tempters are at every bend and even in the mirror: our course explores the power of story to illuminate our lives as a momentous learning journey critical for the role you will play in our world. In today’s culture we say “epic” to mean something enormous, whether a sandwich, a wave, or an adventure, although most people do not think of their own everyday lives as so large-scale. As individuals and in teams, our class will read and recreate –and argue translations of--a handful of famous pre-modern classic epics featuring Homer’s The Odyssey, including Dante’s Divine Comedy, Gilgamesh, Beowulf, Virgil’s The Aeneid, Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac, and Cervantes’ Don Quixote. We will look at the stories' relevance to leadership—decision making, strategic thinking, problem-solving, resilience, crisis management, effective communication, and what sustains the courage of service to one’s community. 

Tracking today’s “classic” covers of epic in literature and film through the lens of our iconic models, such as Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman, and filmed stories such as Wizard of Oz, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, and Tarsem’s The Fall, we will get to the root of epic meaning by creating our own dramatic enactments, do scholarly and critical analysis and close readings, and reflect on films and texts, in journals, poems, and essays. We will ponder classics’ enduring power as we creatively engage with the way minds make a hero out of the struggle to tell us the story.  Thousands of years old, invoked by the Muse, chanted around a fire, or expressed as poetry, personal essays, lyric drama, or film musical, these works of epic imagination have influenced historic civic leaders from John Muir, Anne Frank, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, The Freedom Writers, Churchill, Gandhi, Nikki Giovanni, to Dr. Paul Farmer. How can preposterous and outlandish and idiosyncratic epic scenarios possibly mean something to us in our own lives today? How can we take from epic a knowledge essential for leadership? What does it mean to be an individual in a group: what is the role of friendship, peers, imagination, creativity, spirit? How do we get ourselves and others through a hard day and night? 

Through the magic mirror of epic, works on love and war and identity and life dreams and goals may reflect our own real life struggles. Dante’s dark woods, the Walden woods where Thoreau saunters to “live deliberately,” Dorothy’s whirlwind journey in Oz, Odysseus’s turbulent seas, or the mirror in which Cyrano and the beast confront themselves, may reveal our own lives as epic terrain—and the leadership in each person’s journey.

That's Wild! Eco-Epic and the Green Imagination

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12734 1400 - 1520 MW MAC

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

The ecological mind is as ancient as the hills, revealed in the extravagant stories first imagined by humanity coming to consciousness on earth. We will be literary detectives, exploring ecological themes in ancient through pre-modern literature, from Gilgamesh through Shakespeare, covering Ovid’s epic Metamorphoses. When did a green imagination appear? How is the concept of “wild” developed in earliest literature and law? When did we feel guilt--and reverence--for the earth?  What was earth like as earliest humanity began to understand life? Epic literature is our clue. We are literary archeologists, anthropologists, and geologists looking at epic as artifact, drilling down to our human bedrock conceptions of our natural environment.

Whether in myths or legends, from trees expressing people to Rome founded by wolves, epic literature is a lens into our understanding of how the environment is conceived and represented in earliest literature

In the woods, on the wine dark seas, following the yellow brick road to the Emerald City—wildness represented as witches and monsters and beasts and tempters at every bend and even in the mirror: our course explores the power of story to illuminate our lives as a momentous terrifying and terrific learning journey on earth. Just as in today’s culture we say “epic” to mean something enormous, whether a sandwich, a wave, or an adventure, we say “wild” to mean outrageous, large-scale, threatening—greatly strange and strangely great. As individuals and in teams, our class will read and recreate –and argue translations of-- a handful of famous pre-modern classic epics featuring Homer’s The Odyssey, with Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Dante’s Divine Comedy, Gilgamesh, Beowulf, and Shakespearian drama, including A Midsummer Night’s Dream. We will investigate epic examples from around the world to construct a global understanding of humanity's understanding of nature. Tracking today’s “classic” covers of eco epic in literature and film through the lens of our iconic green models, such as Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, and filmed stories such as Wizard of Oz, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast and Into the Woods, and Tarsem’s The Fall, we will engage with the roots of wildness in epic--and the human imagination and conscience in conceiving our world. 

HC Literature

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 221H 4 Credits

CRN 12735 0830-0950 MW MAC
CRN 12736 1000-1120 MW MAC

Professor: Helen Southworth

Course description will be forthcoming.

War and Heroism

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 12738 0830 - 0950 TR MAC
CRN 17098 0830 - 0950 MW MAC

Professor: Michael A. Furtado

Are warriors and heroes synonymous? This is a question that is still relevant in our world today, and it is part of a legacy that dates back nearly two millennia. What qualities did the heroes of the Ancient and Medieval world possess, and how were those qualities related to the needs and expectations of the societies of which they were a part?  Are the values and behaviors of heroes reflective of those from the society they represent, or are they prescriptive, meant to encourage others to aspire toward? Were the heroes of the ancient and medieval world always admirable people, or do they reflect the characters of the intended audience for their stories, warts and all?

As we will discover, they may be something of both – though to understand them will require us to explore the unique historical contexts within individual values arose and were emphasized in tales of heroism when related to their protagonists. In this course, we will consider the relationship between the individual warrior and society or the “state” and how that relationship changed over time.  In this way, we will be contextualizing warrior values within their appropriate historical contexts, as well as considering the important role of religious, economic, and political developments in the formation, transmission, and practice of shared values for warriors within their respective eras. We will then consider the traits associated with the “hero” in each of our primary sources and work comparatively to analyze the similarities and differences between each as we move through the course.

We will engage texts ranging from the age of the Greek warrior to the medieval knight, as well as giving comparative attention to the Japanese Samurai and the Mongol warriors who created the largest land empire in world history. Central to our course will be the Greek Iliad, and the flawed hero Achilles, whose thirst for individual glory represented the hallmark of warrior virtue in his time; the Roman Aeneid, where Aeneas served as a model for the virtue of service to the state above all; the French Song of Roland, where the hero Roland seeks to balance a need for individual glory and honor with the higher responsibility to his emperor and God; and a variety of chivalric literature from both Marie de France and Chrétien de Troyes, as well as the best of only three extant manuals on knighthood, Geoffroi de Charny’s A Knights Own Book of Chivalry, where the hero Charny attempts to rally French knighthood to reconcile their struggles for individual glory and honor with their obligation to the people and king of France. Students will engage in close reading of these and other sources, as well as secondary historiography intended to help give us a broader perspective on the topics under consideration.


Gender and Sexuality in the West to 1500

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 12740 1200 - 1320 TR MAC

Professor: Emily Gilkey

This course is a survey of civilization and culture to 1500 using the lens of gender to illuminate key historical themes.  In addition to providing an overview of ancient history in the West, the class will also help students to think critically about how the story of the West has been told.  In the past, women have been almost entirely absent from classic historical narratives.  As a class we will work not only to place women back in the story, but also to develop tools for considering how gender informs every aspect of the human experience.  We will unpack historical definitions of masculinity and femininity, considering the social, political and literary use that these distinctions served.

During the course, students will use gender as a category of analysis to consider several important themes.  These include the rise of civilization, urban life in the ancient world and the nature of state power.  We will also look at the place of religion in society, looking at how Greco-Roman polytheism and the spread of monotheism shaped both the wider cultural context and everyday life.  In studying the Middle Ages, we will consider the evolving cultural and political role of the Catholic Church, as well as the ways in which Christianity influenced relationships between the sexes.

From Memory to Written Record

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 12739 1000 - 1120 MW MAC
CRN 16849 1200 - 1320 MW MAC

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

Histories of society and culture can be traced through artifacts such as works of literature, art, and philosophy. They may also be studied through the underlying communication practices that make such pursuits possible including speech and writing. In this course, we take a long view of premodernity, principally in Europe and the Mediterranean region. We focus especially on the history of intellectual practices such as writing, reading, measurement, calculation, and especially the so-called “memory arts” which were fundamental to culture and ideas in the world before the printing press. This course is intensive in reading, writing, and discussion. Students should be prepared to engage unfamiliar subjects. HC231 is the first part of the three-part Honors College history sequence. Parts one and two are chronological, addressing issues in the premodern and the modern worlds. The third part, the research term, is elective. You may choose to take the thematic research course in History or in Literature.

Laws and Conflict Resolution Before 1450

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 12741 1000 - 1120 TR MAC
CRN 12742 1400 - 1520 TR MAC

Professor: Michael Peixoto

On the subject of laws, the sixth-century scholar and theologian Isidore of Seville wrote:

"All jurisprudence consists of laws and customs. A law is a written statute.  A custom is usage tested by age, or unwritten law, for law (legis) is named from reading (legere), because it is written. But custom (mos) is a longstanding usage drawn likewise from 'moral habits' (mores)."

As Isidore's writing suggests, the history of law is a complex subject, and one that spans many aspects of human culture through time.  The study of law includes the rich history of codified laws that existed in ancient Babylonian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Greek and Roman societies and continued through the Middle Ages.  These codes, however, capture only a fraction of the history of human legal interactions, from contractual agreements over property to marriage alliances to the settlement of disputes.  Fundamentally then, the study of law is the understanding of ways in which humans interact with one another and the rules, written and unwritten, that they create to govern those interactions. 

This class takes these human legal interactions as a jumping off point to study the history of the pre-modern world.  Focusing primarily on Europe and the western parts of Asia, we will examine ideas of law and conflict in ancient and medieval societies.  Among other things, we will read about ideas of natural law, the codes of the Merovingians and Anglo-Saxons, the judicial ordeal, jihad and its changing meanings in during the crusades, and the development of the inquisition.  In addition to these readings, a large portion of the class sessions will incorporate the use of original and unpublished manuscripts (either in person in the university archives or in the form of high resolution images) providing students with a direct link between the themes of the class and the material evidence that historians use to decipher concepts of jurisprudence in the past.

The History of History

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 12743 1000 - 1120 TR MAC
CRN 12745 1400 - 1520 TR MAC

Professor: Tim Williams

Premodern peoples from the Ancient Greeks and Romans to early Christians to Mayas all thought about, recorded, and wrote history. This course explores historical knowledge in these and other pre-modern civilizations. In particular, we will ask several questions about past societies that remain relevant today: Why remember the past? For whom is the past important? How does the past enrich our present? What tools work best to disseminate historical knowledge? In answering the questions, we study various cultures, places, and time periods. On the one hand, we focus on the traditional canon of historical thought in "western civilization," including major historical works of ancient Greece, Rome, and China. On the other hand, we explore the periphery of this world so often neglected in the study of “western civilization.”  For example, we consider historical narratives from the Americas, particularly the Mayan Popl Vuh.

Epidemics and Epistemologies in Pre-Modern Europe

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 16866 1200 - 1320 TR MAC
CRN 12747 1400 - 1520 TR MAC

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

This course examines disease epidemics, and ideas about disease, that circulated in Europe from roughly 1000 to 1450. In addition to reconstructing scientific and medical knowledge during the ancient and medieval period, we will also explore how disease is related to epistemology (how people understood and explained disease), nosology (how diseases were classified) and cosmology (how disease, ill health or general misfortune was explained within a society). Our major case study will be the Black Death of 1347 (bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis), which crossed Europe and killed up to 1/3 of the population. Through this devastating case of disease, we will learn about how the public understood and explained disease, how states responded, and how epidemics changed the role of government in protecting the public’s health.

The course will begin with a review of the disease environments of early civilizations and the impact of the agricultural revolution and animal domestication. From there, we will chart some of the changes occurring politically, socially and culturally during the middle ages (such as urbanization, mercantilism, and increased global contact) that laid the groundwork for new disease ecosystems. We will also discuss nascent public health structures, and explore how states responded to the presence of other ancient diseases such as leprosy, measles, smallpox, malaria, and cholera. Finally, as we consider the methods and sources of medical history, we will learn about new techniques for gathering historic disease data, including genetic sequencing and DNA analysis. From a historiographical perspective, we will delve into the evidence and debates around the demographic and epidemiological transitions, and the larger and longer impacts of the Black Death. 

This class requires high level participation and great commitment on the part of students. Students are expected to arrive at class having read carefully and thought critically about the texts. In addition to formal written assignments, all students are required to make an oral presentation highlighting modern examples of themes discussed in the class. Readings are numerous and challenging, and include both primary and secondary sources from multiple disciplines. Our primary sources may include ancient medical texts; works of art such as paintings, music, and poetry; letters and diaries from those suffering from disease; and early epidemiological data including hospital records, doctors’ reports, and maps.

Muslim Women from the 7th to 15th Centuries

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 231H 4 Credits

CRN 12744 1400 - 1520 MW MAC
CRN 12746 1200 - 1320 MW MAC

Professor: Irum Shiekh

In this class, we will learn about the lived experiences of diverse Muslim women of the Middle East, South Asia, Africa, Europe and South East Asia from the historic period of the 7th to 15th centuries.  We will contextualize the narratives of these women within the existing socio-historical, cultural and religious practices across the globe that intermingled with Islam to shape their experiences.  Examples include Khadija b. Khuwaylid (d.620), Nusayba b. Ka’b al-Ansariyya (d. 634), A’isha b. Abi Bakr (d. 678),  Rabi’a al-Adawiyya (d.801), Lubna of Cordoba (d. 984), Al-Malika al-Hurra Arwa al-Sulayhi (d. 1138), Fatima b. Abi al-Qasim (d. 1216), Razia Sultan (d. 1240) and Zaynab b. Ahmad (d. 1339).  

The time period between the 8th to 14th century is generally labeled as the Golden Age of Islam—a historic period when, through warfare, conquest, trade and scholarly teachings, Islam spread and established itself from Morocco to Indonesia and on to Spain.  Scholars from historical and religious disciplines have affirmed that women held a much higher status right at the advent of Islam than the years following the spread of Islam around the globe.  A detailed review of the lives of Khadija and A’isha during the life and right after the death of Prophet Mohammad reveal that these women held positions of power and communities around them respected them as leaders.  However, as Islam moved east, west, north and south, interpretations around gender roles differed over time and many times gender roles accommodated the existing sociocultural and religious practices of the areas that became Islamic.  Women exercised power as spiritual and religious leaders in some Islamic areas, a practice that was considered inappropriate in other Islamic cultures. Inheritance laws, marriage customs, family lineage, and veiling practices differed across the globe and overtime.  In addition, splinter groups within Islam such as Shiites, Sufis, and Kharijs developed their own interpretations that differed from each other and from the mainstream Sunni interpretations.  As a result, the lives of Muslim women of this vast and diverse region of civilizations, cultures, languages, and religions differed from one location to another and from one century to another.  By studying the narratives of Muslim women across the globe, we will learn the history of Islam through the lives of women who lived as merchants, religious and political leaders, battlefield warriors, scientists, inventors, advisors, poets, writers, queens, storytellers, and slaves.

The class format includes short lectures, documentary viewing, and class discussions.

Speech and Debate

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 399H 1.0 - 5.0 Credits

CRN 12748 1200 - 1350 TR ANS 193

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

The Clark Honors College hosts the nationally-ranked University of Oregon Forensics Program. The program is designed to teach rhetorical habits of mind and speech through intercollegiate debate and individual events. The program travels to about thirteen tournaments, hosts two on-campus tournaments, and engages in on-campus speaking activities. Two graduate teaching fellows are assigned to the program. Debate students are paired with partners and are expected to conduct extensive research on the debate topics selected by the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and the Parliamentary Debate Association. Novice and experienced student debaters are welcome.

This course is open to all UO students (not only Clark Honors College students).


Thesis Orientation Workshop

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 408H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12753 1100 - 1550 Saturday, October 15 only STB 251
CRN 12754 1700 - 2150 Thursday, October 13 only STB 251

Professor: TBA

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad. 

 

Food and beverages are provided.


Writing the Journey: Studying and Practicing Travel Writing

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 421H 4 Credits

CRN 12756 1400 - 1520 MW GSH 130

Professor: Elizabeth Bohls

Travel can be transformative, jolting the traveler out of her comfortable world-view—or it can serve to reaffirm that complacent perspective. It can be difficult and dangerous, true to its roots in the concept of "travail" (labor, toil, hardship, suffering)—or convenient, even luxurious. Before trains, planes, steamships and the Internet, travel and travel writing were important sources of information or knowledge about other cultures and little-known areas of the globe. We read a variety of travel and exploration writing from the sixteenth century to the present day, focusing mostly on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. At the same time, each student composes and refines his or her own account of a journey of some kind—whether distant and exotic or close to home, undertaken for leisure, education, work, or family necessity.

We share and critique these as part of the course. Questions we ask about our own and other authors' travel include: how do the conditions of travel (e.g., working or leisured, voluntary or compulsory) shape the traveler's experience? How do travelers' preconceptions shape their experiences, and under what conditions do these preconceptions get overturned? What rhetorical devices or strategies do travel writers use to represent their encounters with unfamiliar cultures and strange people, and what do these reveal about travelers' deep desires and fears? What is tourism, and how, historically, did it come into being? How do travelers impact their "travelees"—those who inhabit the places they visit or colonize?

Text: Bohls and Duncan, ed., Travel Writing 1700-1830 (Oxford), Carl Thompson, Travel Writing (Routledge), and Liz Jobey, ed., The New Granta Book of Travel (Granta). Additional authors may include Cabeza de Vaca, Olaudah Equiano, Mungo Park, Mary Wortley Montagu, Jamaica Kincaid, Rory Stewart, and Cheryl Strayed. We view the film In This World (Michael Winterbottom, 2004) about two Afghan boys trying to get to London as refugees.

Getting Medieval

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 421H 4 Credits

CRN 12757 1400 - 1520 MW GSH 132

Professor: Louise Bishop

What is “medieval”?  The word anglicizes Latin medium aevum and comes into common usage in the nineteenth century, replacing the previously-used term “Gothic.”  Why the change? Through primary texts like The Song of Roland and the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, we explore the “creation” of the Middle Ages and ponder the odd admixture of scorn and delight that the term "medieval" conjures for modern audiences.  “Medieval,” as well as “Gothic,” have been interpreted, re-interpreted, and even recreated from the “Renaissance” – an era now called “Early Modern” -- to today. We will grapple with the creation of historical “eras” and pay some special attention to the word’s use in contemporary analyses of war and torture. How can the word “medieval” contain its paradoxical resonances of torturous violence – getting medieval on your @#$% (Pulp Fiction) -- and chivalric romance?  Course requirements include primary and secondary readings with accompanying writing, class presentations, and a term paper. One film showing outside of class time is required. Schedules permitting, we will visit the Benedictine monastery in Mount Angel, Oregon.


Literature by and about Gay Men

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 424H/421H 4 Credits

CRN 16426 1000 - 1120 MW ESL 112

Professor: Henry Alley

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium, and an IP Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

The texts are Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (short novel), Forster’s Maurice (novel), Ginsberg’s “Howl” (long poem), Williams's Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (play), Kushner’s Angels in America (play), Kramer’s Women in Love (screenplay), Fierstein’s Torch Song Trilogy (play), Black’s Milk:  The Shooting Script (screenplay) and selections from The Penguin Anthology of Homosexual Verse.

The course will provide an overview of gay men’s literature, as it has evolved from ancient times to the present day. We will discuss how social acceptance has both grown and created more backlashes, as dramatized in the literature. We will look at four tragic perspectives in Wilde, Kramer, Williams, and Black, three epic outlooks in Forster, Ginsberg and Kushner, and one comic point of view in Fierstein. These works will trace out the birth of the gay man’s Arcadia, where two lovers may retreat from adversity, to the development of the gay marriage and family in the twentieth century. We will have a special look at the war against homophobia, particularly as expressed in the life and work of Oscar Wilde, Allen Ginsberg, Tennessee Williams and Harvey Milk.

There will be two short papers and one long one. A reading journal will be optional.  We will have several quizzes.  There will be a strong emphasis on discussion, and videos of several of the works will be available or recommended—Women in Love, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Torch Song Trilogy, Angels in America, Howl, and Milk.



Preventing Genocide and Mass Atrocities in the 21st Century

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 424H/421H 4 Credits

CRN 12759 1200 - 1320 MW ESL 116

Professor: David Frank

Graduation Requirement:  This class fulfills an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance (IP) Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class fulfills both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

This course is dedicated to the tragedies of mass atrocity and genocide.   We consider approaches designed to inoculate against mass atrocities and genocide and the strategic strategies available to confront mass atrocity or genocide breakout.  We draw from the disciplines of rhetoric, social psychology, and decision-making. The genocide in Rwanda and the ongoing mass atrocities in Syria and the genocide in Darfur are featured.  Students gain a command of the scholarly literature in these three fields, engage in structured decision making simulations designed confront the tradeoffs faced by decision makers, and write a significant term paper on the decision making taking place when government officials are faced with contexts of mass atrocity and genocide. The course is divided into three interrelated sections: I) Theories explaining, inoculating against and successful interventions in mass atrocity and genocide.  II) Simulations of government decision-making in contexts of mass atrocity and genocide.  III) Student works of scholarship on mass atrocity and genocide.

Human Rights, Peace and Conflict in the 21st Century

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 424H/431H 4 Credits

CRN 12758 1400 - 1650 T ESL 112

Professor: Cheyney Ryan

Graduation Requirement:  This class fulfills a Social Science Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class fulfills both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

We explore the history and practice of human rights today and their role in today's political struggles for a better world. Our focus is both theoretical and practical. We explore the philosophical underpinnings of human rights, as they emerged, among other places, from modernity's experience with war. This means looking at the major human rights documents, like the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights, and their influence on contemporary international institutions.

We also look at specific struggles for human rights, both past and present. Of special concern are struggles around racism, sexism, and economic injustice. The course challenges students to think about their obligations as global citizens as well as how issues of human rights impact their immediate lives.

Professor Ryan is a senior fellow at Oxford University, Department of Politics and International Relations, where he directs his program's human rights initiatives. He is also co-chair of the Oxford Human Rights Consortium which conducts workshops and programs on human rights at Oxford and other places. He taught at Oregon previously, and continues to teach this one course each year for the Honors College.

Plants and People: Ethnobotany in the Pacific Northwest

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 431H 4 Credits

CRN 12760 1400 - 1550 MW COL 142

Professor: Kathryn Lynch

Important note: This is a course that includes a MANDATORY field trip scheduled for Saturday, October 8th.

Forests have always been places for humans to harvest foods, medicines, and materials for clothing, shelter, spirituality, and decoration. From the early hominids to modern humans, from the ‘old’ world to the ‘new’ world, everywhere forests exist they provide important resources to human communities. These species are collectively known as non-timber forest products (NTFPs). Today, even in post-industrial countries such as the U.S., people from diverse cultural, ethnic and economic backgrounds continue to gather plants for a broad range of reasons.

This class examines these people/plant relationships– and how this biodiversity is being tapped to promote both conservation and rural economic development. We investigate the complex economics, multi-faceted politics, and diverse cultural traditions associated with NTFPs. We look at the ancient gathering practices of Native Americans, the introduced plants and traditions of immigrants, and the emerging practices of people seeking to reconnect with the natural world.

The Consumer Society

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 431H 4 Credits

CRN 12761 0830 - 0950 TR ESL 112

Professor: Christopher Chávez

As participants in a consumer society, we are beholden to the marketplace for all the material objects that surround us. Furthermore, marketplace logic is said to have infiltrated all facets of social life and indelibly shapes our notions of love, community and self-worth. As students who are preparing for careers in law, journalism, film, etc. you become important players in shaping consumer culture. Consequently, there is a need to reflect on the impact of our work on the society in which we live. Drawing from such disparate fields as history, communications, economics and linguistics, we explore what it means to live in a consumer society and how empowerment might be found within the confines of the marketplace. Taking a critical-cultural approach, we begin by studying cultural institutions, ideologies, artifacts and identities, but we will also examine current issues in consumer culture such as globalization, culture and subculture and various forms of resistance.

Mariners, Ships, Wine and Law in the Middle Ages: The Rôles d’Oléron, a Case Study in Problem Solving and Private Law

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 431H 4 Credits

CRN 16188 1600-1850 R PLC 361

Professor: TBA

Professor:  James Shephard

Living on the Atlantic seaboard of Europe in the 13th would have presented many challenges.  There was political instability and incertitude as the French and English crowns competed and fought for domination of the coast from the Pyrenees north to Flanders.  New commercial trade routes and migration patterns put communities into competition for economic survival—and supremacy.   New technological developments in shipbuilding significantly increased capacity and distance, and disrupted the old, established patterns of trade and commerce.   Political instability, migration, globalization and technological disruption—does this sound familiar?

Dealing with the challenges would have required new ideas and new ways of solving problems and, thus, the Rôles d’Oléron (hereinafter, the Rôles) were conceived.  Named after an island off the southern coast of France between Bordeaux and La Rochelle, the Rôles originally consisted of a collection of twenty-four judgments or rules, each one paragraph in length and written in Old French, that relate to the transportation of wine from the southern Atlantic coast of France to northern Europe.  

The Rôles have a unique place in legal history because they form the basis of modern maritime law in both the French civil law tradition and the English common law tradition.  The Rôles have been cited as precedent numerous times by the US Courts, including the US Supreme Court and, accordingly, can be considered as part of US maritime law as defined by the US Constitution.  

Students in this course will have a unique opportunity to use and work with a primary historical source—a 14thcentury manuscript of the Rôles located in the municipal archives of Bayonne, France. This document has never been studied or analyzed.  The manuscript provides the text closest to the original version and will allow us to gain new insight into the meaning of these laws.

The class will be structured as a collaborative, problem solving exercise.  Each student will join a team and will be expected to work together to produce original research and analysis that is shared with the entire class.  We will learn from each other in this class and, together, embark on a voyage of discovery that will add to the knowledge we have of an important set of laws that have had an enduring influence on the development of maritime law around the world.

Sephardic Cultures: The History, Literature and Music of Iberian Jews

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 434H/421H 4 Credits

CRN 12763 1200 - 1350 MW PAC 30

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Graduation Requirement: This class fulfills an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an International Cultures (IC) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class fulfills both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Course description is forthcoming.

Biology and Politics

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 12766 1600 - 1750 TR GSH 103

Professor: Gabriel Yospin

Scientific information plays a major role in nearly every government policy decision. In many instances, science becomes a part of policy with minimal discussion. At other times, the role of science in policy decisions is controversial. How should scientific information be a part of policy decisions? How should science influence politics? How should politics influence science? How should laws and regulations cope with incomplete or inconclusive science? Is scientific information objective? Apolitical? Neutral? Or is scientific information value laden, political, and biased? What makes scientific information credible? Who has the standing to speak for Science? What is Science?

This class provides an opportunity to examine these questions, and further related topics. We do this through open discussion, where all participants bring their own perspectives on these issues, as well as contemporary events related to the course. There are three phases to this course. First, we examine acid rain as a case study in the development of a scientific idea and regulatory policy. With this case study in mind, we bring together foundational papers in the philosophy of science, sociology of science, and works on science, policy, and politics. Finally, we attempt to use all of this information to answer questions about what science is, what scientists should do, and the role for science in society.

Cosmology

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 16378 0830 - 0950 TR GSH 103

Professor: James Schombert

Cosmology, the study of the formation and evolution of the Universe, has progressed from its origins in early man’s ideas of Nature, to Chinese and Greek worldviews, to Dante’s vision of Heaven and Hell, to Newton’s Clockwork Universe. Today, cosmology has entered a Golden Age with the launch of numerous space telescopes and development of technology that allows us to study the echo of the Big Bang. In addition to exploring the processes behind the origin of spacetime and matter, the science of cosmology has also expanded to resolve a number of philosophical and theological issues, such as Creation (i.e. Genesis 1:1) and the anthropic principle.

This course is a historical and philosophical review of our cosmological worldview from mythical times to modern science. We explore topics in the geometry of the Universe, expanding spacetime and the Big Bang, dark matter, black holes and wormholes, quarks and mesons, galaxies and quantum physics. Our goal is to provide the student with a summary of our current understanding of astrophysics as it relates to the structure of the Universe and what topics remain to be explored in the 21st century. The material is presented without complex mathematics, but an understanding of basic geometry and algebra is helpful.

This course has been taught to HC seniors as a 400-level colloquia in the past. One of the constant concerns in science teaching is our inability to teach modern topics in the sciences, rather than material that dates from the 19th century. Response to that criticism is that one must ”crawl, before walking”; however, this course has been successful in exploring topics in modern cosmology without consuming large portions of class time ”crawling”. This is done by having a very flexible reading list (students follow paths where their knowledge is missing, skipping sections they already understand) and using class time to interactively following topics where the students are confused. This turns the class into a seminar rather than lecture.

Geometry with a Taste of its History

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 12767 1400-1520 MW GSH 131

Professor: Shlomo Libeskind

The seminar explores the development of geometry through the ages – from its practical origins through its deductive emphasis in ancient Greece, to Descartes’ invention of coordinate approach and the discovery of non-Euclidean Geometry in the early part of the 19th century. The seminar has a mathematical emphasis with focus on geometric constructions, coordinate geometry and transformational geometry. We explore the historical aspects, in part through viewing beautifully presented short video lectures from the Great Courses Company.

The seminar is accessible to any honors college student with a good knowledge of high school pre-calculus mathematics. We discuss strategies for approaching proofs and solving problems and guide students toward successfully solving unfamiliar problems on their own. We explore the following:

             How does one know how to begin a proof or a solution and how to proceed?

             Which approach is more promising and why?

             Are different solutions possible, and how do they compare?

We emphasize that proofs and solutions to problems don’t come “out of the blue” and discuss the thinking process leading to a proof or solution. Most of the evaluation (about 80%) is from weekly assignments and short class presentations from the assignments.

Relativity, the Quantum, and Reality

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 12765 0900-0950 MWF HED 146

Professor: Michael Kellman

We explore the profound conceptual challenges in thinking about nature brought about by two of the great revolutions in science of the twentieth century: special relativity and quantum mechanics. We first explore each of these theories at a deep but simple level, using elementary examples.  We then explore the extremely strange things that happen when we try to put these theories together.

We begin with readings from Newton and Leibniz on absolute space and time, itself a revolutionary idea when propounded in the seventeenth century at the dawn of modem science.

Next, we explore the change in thinking about space and time brought about by the theory of relativity, especially Einstein’s revolutionary understanding of 1905. We perform an intense reading of Einstein’s famous popular text on relativity, still one of the clearest expositions, and a fascinating insight into the mind of this great thinker.

Then we explore the revolutionary changes brought about in the early twentieth century with the advent of quantum mechanics, the theory of the microscopic world. We pursue the most basic understanding, probing the famous wave particle duality with the two-slit experiment, following the renowned treatment of Feynman.

After dealing with the perplexing situation of the notorious “Schrodinger’s cat” the course culminates with an exploration of the mind-boggling things that happen when we try to put the relativity and quantum theories together. The predictions of each theory separately, and both together, have been verified in all experiments with astonishing accuracy. However, with the joining of relativity with quantum mechanics, profound and bizarre problems arise -- conceptually things just don’t make complete sense!  We see that perhaps the deepest problem is what Einstein called the “spooky action at a distance” in “entangled” quantum systems that comes about when we include relativity.  Quantum magic results, challenging our deepest ideas of “reality.”

This course is intended as a serious exploration of some of the most fascinating ideas that have come out of the modem scientific revolutions that took place first in the seventeenth century with the advent of Newton’s physics, and then in the twentieth century with the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. There is an emphasis on original texts of leading thinkers; written composition; and serious mathematical treatment that is up to the task, but at an elementary pre- calculus level accessible to intelligent students of various backgrounds.  The needed mathematics are introduced in a tutorial fashion, either as review or new material, depending on personal background.

There are graded homework assignments and a Midterm and Final exam covering the formal and computational development of relativity and quantum mechanics. There is a cumulative writing assignment that builds an essay in four parts. These two parts of the course are weighted equally in assigning grades.  Intense discussion in and out of scheduled class time is strongly encouraged.

The course is not intended to be primarily for students majoring in science – Honors College students majoring in fields other than natural science may well be the greatest beneficiaries.

Decolonizing Research: The Northern Paiute History Project

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 444H/431H 4 Credits

CRN 12768 1400 - 1550 TR LIB 201

Professor: Kevin Hatfield

Professor:  Jennifer O'Neal

Graduation Requirement: This class fulfills both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class fulfills both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class.

Over the past four years the “Northern Paiute History Project” has evolved into a formal collaboration between co-instructors Kevin Hatfield and Jennifer O’Neal and the Northern Paiute communities of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and the Burns Paiute Tribe.  The course instructors have partnered with tribal elders, spiritual leaders, language instructors, Museum and Culture and Heritage Department staff, and many other tribal community members and visiting scholars to develop a set of shared research protocols and ethics for this course.  The course positions students to perform original research and create new knowledge in direct and continuous collaboration and mentorship with tribal community partners.  Ultimately, students contribute scholarship to a largely neglected and traditionally marginalized and distorted field of history, while applying their research to on-going community-based “restoration” history projects with the Northern Paiute tribal communities. 

“We don’t care what you know, until we know that you care.” Visiting indigenous scholars and students interacting with our students echoed this maxim repeatedly when reflecting on their research collaborations with settler-society allies and academic institutions during the third annual Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples Conference hosted at the UO in fall 2014. This conviction exemplifies the decolonizing methodological framework guiding our course, which encourages students engaging in research with indigenous source communities to explore multiple forms of “knowledges.”  One of the many thinkers the instructors draw inspiration from for crafting the pedagogy of the course is Eva Marie Garroutte and her concept of “Radical Indigenism,” which contends: “Entering tribal relations implies maintaining respect for community values in the search for knowledge. This respect is much more than an attitude, it requires real commitments and real sacrifices on the part of those who practice it.”  Hence, the course explores how historically the educational system, and often particularly the writing and teaching of social sciences, have functioned as sites of oppression, assimilation, and ethnocide controlled by dominant culture voices and misrepresentations.  We seek to reframe and reexamine this historiography and construct through restorative social justice.

The transformative centerpiece of the course is a two-day mandatory field research trip (tentatively scheduled for October 14-15, 2016) to the Warm Springs Reservation and cultural sites in Central Oregon. This experience fosters relationships that endure throughout, and beyond, the class through partner class visits on campus, conference calls, written correspondence, and oral histories. The trip also encourages students to think critically about the way they have traditionally learned history by physically and intellectually immersing them in the culture and history they are studying and placing them in dialogue with tribal community course partners. The group discussions between students and tribal members also generate new questions such as how to incorporate the multiple viewpoints and truths presented from tribal members, and how to negotiate differences and contradictions among documentary primary sources, oral history testimony, and living memory.

According to Wilson Wewa, Warm Springs tribal elder, spiritual leader, and course partner: “[The class] is an opportunity for me to enlighten non-native students about Native American history. The work has been a long time coming for the university community to reach out to the tribal communities, to get our perspective on the history that’s been written about us because it has been a diluted history based on writings from the military, from the federal government, from the state government, and the Indian agents. With dedicated researchers and students, they are the ones that want to know the truth, they are the ones that are unlocking those doors of change.”

Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 477H 2 Credits

CRN 12770 1000 - 1150 W MAC
CRN 12772 1000 - 1150 M MAC

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, available on the CHC Canvas site, only after formulating, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic & Thesis Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic & Thesis Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner are asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic & Thesis Coordinator.

 

Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 477H 2 Credits

CRN 12771 1400 - 1550 W MAC
CRN 12773 1200 - 1350 T MAC

Professor: Helen Southworth

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, available on the CHC Canvas site, only after formulating, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic & Thesis Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic & Thesis Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner are asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic & Thesis Coordinator.

 

Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2016-2017
HC 477H 2 Credits

CRN 12769 0800 - 0950 T MAC

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, available on the CHC Canvas site, only after formulating, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic & Thesis Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic & Thesis Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner are asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic & Thesis Coordinator.