Spring 2016 Course Descriptions

21st Century Science

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 4 Credits

CRN 36685 0900-0950 MWF CHA 303

Professor: James Schombert

The 21th century is positioned to be a turning point in scientific knowledge and technological progress. During this last century, our description of Nature has shifted from a static Cartesian-Newtonian view of a clockwork Universe to an expanding Universe ruled by chaos and complexity. This course will explore topics in three divisions of Nature; the macroscopic world, microscopic world and cosmology. In addition, this course will serve as an introduction to the philosophy that we use to apply meaning to reality, such as reductionism, emergence, holism and creation. This will be a non-mathematical course for freshmen and sophomores that will explore, from a modern perspective, the key science issues that we will encounter in the 21st century.

This course is designed to present the broadest overview of science with sufficient detail (particularly the labs) to give a student a solid comprehension of the scientific worldview. This course has been taught for several years at the HC to satisfy lower division science requirements. It is designed to give broad view of science as a discipline, rather than focusing on a specific field. The course is taught to cover each of the three current divisions in our natural science fields (microscopic, macroscopic and cosmological) from a historical/philosophical point of view (in this case, a philosophy course as taught by a scientist). The course material is heavy in essay reading assignments taken from general interest science magazines such as Scientific American and Physics Today (there is no single textbook to cover the range of topics proposed).

If you are going to register for this course, you must also register for the accompanying Lab component on Fridays, 1000-1120, in 13 WIL (CRN 36698).

21st Century Science + LAB

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 0 Credits

CRN 36698 1000 - 1120 F WIL 13

Professor: James Schombert

See course description under CRN 36685.

The Birds and the Bees and the Flowers and the Trees

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 4 Credits

CRN 36661 1400 - 1520 T HUE 112

Professor: Peter Wetherwax

Let me tell ya ‘bout the birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees……..and a thing called love.

Without pollinators, most flowering-plants couldn’t fall in love…...rather, they couldn’t find a mate. The sex life of flowering plants is every bit as interesting as the sex life of animals. To make things even more interesting, flowering plants have managed to entice animals to help them find mates. Animal pollinators don’t provide these cupid-services for free, they expect to get paid, often with sweets. Many of the things we love about flowers (e.g., color, shape, smell) have evolved in order to attract pollinators to aid them in mating. Isn’t it interesting to think about what we are actually giving someone when we give flowers as a sign of love?

Pollinators provide vital ecosystem functions and services. Most flowering plants rely on pollinators for their very existence. Humans have come to depend on pollinators for the production of most of their crops. There is a well-documented decline in the numbers of all major groups of pollinators: insects that include bees, flies and butterflies, birds, and bats. The main reason for the decline is the loss of suitable habitat for both the pollinators and the plants. But there are several other causes of the decline including pesticides, beekeeping practices and the introduction of non-native species of both plants and their pollinators.

In this course we will use pollination biology, and the pollination crisis, as a case study for understanding some basic biology, conservation biology and scientific field research methodologies. It is designed for non-science majors.

The ability to critically understand pollination and to analyze the current pollination-crisis requires knowledge of several areas of inquiry including:

        many fundamental ideas in biology including ecology, evolution, sexual reproduction, meiosis, flower and fruit development, plant mating systems, behavioral ecology, and animal and plant diversity.

        conservation issues associated with endangered species of both plants and their pollinators.

        the impact of introduced species of both plants and their pollinators.

It also requires the student to understand the scientific methods that are being used to both understand the problem, and to develop strategies for mitigation.

The best way to understand science, is to do science. Students in this course will gain a better sense of how science is conducted by (1) reading and analyzing original research papers and (2) designing, conducting and reporting on their own field investigations.

The course meets twice a week in a biology lab room: once for 80 minutes and once for 3 hours (mostly for lab activities). Each meeting will be a combination of lecture, discussion and hands-on activities (labs). If you are going to register for this course, you must also register for the Lab (CRN 36664).


The Birds and the Bees and the Flowers and the Trees + LAB

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 0 Credits

CRN 36664 1400 - 1650 R HUE 112

Professor: Peter Wetherwax

See course description under CRN 36661.

Endgame, Wasteland, and Apocalypse: Literature at the End of History

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 223H 4 Credits

CRN 32618 1200 - 1320 TR CHA 303

Professor: Casey Shoop

Literature has always been obsessed with the end of the world, but this “sense of ending” is also assumed to offer some imaginary and critical purchase on the world as it is. How does the present appear when it becomes the past of an imagined future? Our course will examine a range of endtimes literary and cinematic texts from across the twentieth century—a period particularly full of apocalyptic thinking.

We will be especially interested in what these texts, far from escaping their historical moment, suggest and reveal about their own contemporaneity:  what kinds of aesthetic, historical, political and ethical concerns are involved in literature that imagines the end of history?  How do questions of reception and genre bear upon the imaginative orientation of these works? Along the way we will address some theoretical currents in philosophy, ecology and risk, as well as the histories of modernization and globalization. Possible authors and texts include T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, William Butler Yeats’s selected poems, Samuel Beckett’s “Endgame,” David Markson’s Wittgenstein’s Mistress, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake among many others. Possible films include Terry Giliam’s “Brazil,” George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead,” Alfonso Cuarón’s “Children of Men” among many others.

Life Writing

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 223H 4 Credits

CRN 32619 1000 - 1120 MW CHA 307
CRN 32620 0830 - 0950 MW CHA 307

Professor: Helen Southworth

In this class, we'll look at a range of memoir, autobiography and biography.  We'll consider the purpose, challenges and pleasures of life writing.  We'll look at resources available to the biographer and consider how these have changed with the advent of the internet.  We'll discuss questions of celebrity and obscurity, of iconography and afterlives.  For the final project, students will have the option to undertake a biographical project linked to the Professor's digital humanities project, the Modernist Archive Humanities Project (modernistarchives.com).  Authors/subjects may include Ta-Nehishi Coates, Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath and Helen Macdonald, with theoretical readings by Hermione Lee, Michael Holroyd and Janet Malcolm.

Life Writing

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 223H 4 Credits

CRN 32621 1200 - 1320 MW ANS 192

Professor: Helen Southworth

In this class, we'll look at a range of memoir, autobiography and biography.  We'll consider the purpose, challenges and pleasures of life writing.  We'll look at resources available to the biographer and consider how these have changed with the advent of the internet.  We'll discuss questions of celebrity and obscurity, of iconography and afterlives.  For the final project, students will have the option to undertake a biographical project linked to the Professor's digital humanities project, the Modernist Archive Humanities Project (modernistarchives.com).  Authors/subjects may include Ta-Nehishi Coates, Virginia Woolf, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath and Helen Macdonald, with theoretical readings by Hermione Lee, Michael Holroyd and Janet Malcolm.

Artificial Births in Speculative Fiction from "Frankenstein" to the Present

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 223H 4 Credits

CRN 32622 1600 - 1720 MW CHA 307

Professor: Elizabeth Raisanen

Ever since the 1818 publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, artificial births have been a recurring plot point in many works of speculative fiction. Heralded by many as the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein explores a world in which new life is artificially created by a technological rather than a natural process, a theme that subsequent authors have engaged with in order to call into question the very categories of the “natural” and the “artificial” when it comes to reproduction. In this course, we will read works of speculative fiction by Mary Shelley, Aldous Huxley, Marge Piercy, Joanna Russ, James Tiptree, Jr., Octavia Butler, and Kazuo Ishiguro in order to explore how these authors’ imaginative renderings of the social norms, values, laws, and technologies that govern reproduction reflect back upon the conditions surrounding pregnancy and birth in the world that we actually live in (especially with the advent of cloning and other types of genetic engineering). Inquiry into these texts will encourage us to discuss how our conceptions of gender roles and maternal identities change when women are no longer necessary in the creation of new life, or when women themselves develop alternative reproductive technologies that allow them to reproduce without men. Indeed, our readings will prompt us to explore how all birth practices are socially constructed and thus “artificial” in some way, and how, conversely, all kinds of birth practices and family formation (whether aided by technology or not) can be defined as “natural.”

Reading Spaces

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 223H 4 Credits

CRN 32623 1400 - 1520 TR CHA 307
CRN 36610 1200 - 1320 TR CHA 307

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

This course explores literature of the city since the early nineteenth century. It examines questions of race, power and space in the representations of the individual and the crowd, highlighting the role of the urban observer. Students should be prepared to read and write attentively and rigorously, to work collaboratively on oral and written projects, and produce a research project connected to one of the course texts. Frequent writing exercises will be assigned throughout the term.


Texts may include The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louise Stevenson, Passing by Nella Larsen, The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler, and/or Maud Martha by Gwendolyn Brooks.


Anthropology and the Middle Ages

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 233H 4 Credits

CRN 36616 1000 - 1120 WF GSH 103
CRN 36618 1200 - 1320 WF GSH 103

Professor: Michael Peixoto

Pre-modern historians of all stripes face the dilemma of how to extract information about the distant past from a dearth of textual data.  Even when texts on a given topic remain extant, those texts, constructed and deeply biased objects that they are, reflect only the views of a minute and elite portion of society, even when they are not outright forgeries.  In dealing with this methodological conundrum, medievalists (and especially French and American scholars of the Middle Ages) have frequently turned to interdisciplinary approaches, anthropological theory in particular, to help make sense of pre-modern texts and practices.  As with many other fields of study, history and anthropology were once one in the same discipline.  They split in the nineteenth century as a result of increased professionalization and specialization in the academy.  Today more so than ever, medievalists depend on a renewed theoretical connection to that disciplinary legacy to craft new and better histories of the Middle Ages.

For the first five weeks of this class, we will study particular themes in historical anthropology alongside the works of scholars who applied them to the interpretation of medieval sources.  We will study symbolic rituals such as the healing powers of kings, the veneration of saints, and the ceremonial creation of a knight.  In addition, we will examine theories of gift-giving, emotions, myths, and persecution, paying close attention to ideas of community, heresy, belonging, and power.  Our readings will cover a wide range of topics including gifts to the dead, monastic curses, and the scandalous story of a female pope.  Throughout these first five weeks, students will be developing their own research projects.  In the second half of the class we will shift our focus entirely to student research.  Students will present work in progress and workshop papers. Due to the methodological focus of the class, students will be able to pursue a wide range of research topics on pre-modern history.


Gender and American History

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 233H 4 Credits

CRN 32624 1200 - 1320 MW CHA 307
CRN 32627 1400 - 1520 MW CHA 307

Professor: Tim Williams

This is a course in historical methods and research, focusing specifically on the history of gender in the United States from its establishment through the 1980s. We will spend the first third of the term studying and discussing how historians have used gender to understand many different aspects of United States history, including class, education, race and slavery, war, and popular culture. Following this introductory unit, students will develop and execute an original research paper on a topic related to our course theme. In particular, we will pay particular attention to the resources available in the University of Oregon’s special collections library, as well as significant online databases for historical research. In the final third of the course, students will present their research to the class.  Please note that this course is both reading and writing intensive. In addition to regular reading responses and small library assignments, be prepared to produce a brief research proposal, an annotated bibliography, and a final research paper.

The American City

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 233H 4 Credits

CRN 32625 1200 - 1320 TR GSH 103
CRN 32626 1000 - 1120 TR GSH 103

Professor: Ocean Howell

In the postbellum (post-Civil War) era, the cities of the United States provided the world with a number of firsts, including the first skyscraper and the first settlement to reach a population of 10 million.  At various points, American cities have been the largest, the tallest, the densest, and the wealthiest on the planet.  For all of their technological and social triumphs, however, American cities have also nurtured crushing inequality, dangerous slums, and criminal economies.  This course will introduce students to the history of one of the most fascinating and contradictory social forms of the modern world.  Students will read about the American city from a variety of perspectives: as a design artifact, a product of architects and planners; as a political arena, a set of governmental institutions; as a system for ordering social relations, especially those of race, ethnicity, class, and gender; as a market, an engine for generating and distributing wealth; as an entertainment machine, an engine for generating and satisfying a dizzying array of human desires; and as an underworld, a breeding ground for countercultures and criminal enterprises. 


The first third of the course will focus on readings with the aim of demonstrating the variety of possible approaches to researching the American city.  Students will begin thinking about the subjects and the research strategies they would like to pursue.  The middle third of the course (three weeks) will be spent discussing the particular topics students have developed.  Each member of the class will have an opportunity to assign a few pages of reading pertaining to the topic, give an overview of the research project, and discuss the issues involved with the rest of the class.  In the final third of the course each member of the class will give a ten-minute presentation of the results of his/her research.  Written assignments: prospectus and final research paper.


Speech and Debate

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 399H 1-5 Credits

CRN 32628 1200 - 1350 TR GSH 117

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

Clark Honors College hosts the nationally-ranked University of Oregon Forensics Program. The program is designed to teach rhetorical habits of mind and speech through intercollegiate debate and individual events. The program travels to about thirteen tournaments, hosts two on-campus tournaments, and engages in some on-campus speaking activities. Two graduate teaching fellows are assigned to the program. Debate students will be paired with partners and are expected to conduct extensive research on the debate topics selected by the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and the Parliamentary Debate Association. Novice and experienced student debaters are welcome.

This course is open to all UO students (not only Clark Honors College students) to enroll.

Thesis

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 403H 1.0 - 12.0 Credits

CRN 32629

Professor: STAFF

Thesis (403) credits (1-12)  helps students explore potential thesis topics and, during the thesis writing process, to help students keep pace with thesis work.  Thesis and research credit registration is potentially available in all of the university's majors, departments, programs, or schools.  Students register for thesis or research credits under the direction of faculty in their major including, but not limited to, their primary thesis advisor. Currently, thesis and research credits are not a required component of the CHC thesis process. The decision concerning registration for such credits rests with faculty members in the student's major, who direct the work such credit entails. Departments, programs, and schools make individual decisions about whether such credits fulfill requirements for the major.  In most cases, thesis and research credits do not satisfy major requirements.    Each department/program/school has its own process for registering for such credits: check with faculty in the major department and with the department/program/school's main office.  To find the location of the appropriate office, use the UO homepage's A to Z list, http://www.uoregon.edu/azindex/. Students can register for research or thesis credits at any point during their degree program, including prior to enrolling in HC 477-Thesis Prospectus, the final required thesis course.  The CHC suggests that students register for  thesis or research credits following completion of the Thesis Prospectus course.

Thesis Orientation Workshop

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 408H 1 Credits

CRN 32632 1100 - 1550 Sat., April 2 only CHA 303
CRN 32633 1700 - 2150 Thur., April 7 only CHA 303

Professor: TBA/Staff

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.   Food and beverages are provided.

Thesis Orientation Workshop

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 408H 1 Credits

CRN 32634 1100 - 1550 Sat., April 9 only CHA 303

Professor: Susanna Lim

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.  

Food and beverages are provided.

Architecture Curates Nature

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 421H 4 Credits

CRN 32636 1000 - 1120 MW GSH 130

Professor: STAFF

“Architecture Curates Nature” invites study of how buildings physically position people relative to the natural world to explore ways that buildings reflect and reinforce concepts of nature. We will read and discuss criticism of nature in architecture and then study examples of structures that are built purposefully to choreograph perception of a place—Maya Lin’s Bird Blind and Snohetta’s Reindeer Viewing Station, for example.

Students will use digital photo collage to study buildings as interfaces between visitors and the environment, learn to interpret buildings in terms of the perception and construction of nature, and will have the opportunity to use re-representation as an investigative tool.

The American Uncanny: The World of David Lynch in Film and Theory

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 421H 4 Credits

CRN 32638 1700 - 1850 TR CON 201

Professor: Casey Shoop

“This whole world is wild at heart and weird on top.”  This seminar will devote itself to exploring the uncanny cinematic works of film and television director David Lynch. What are the contours, affects and meanings of this world called “Lynchian” in which the mundane life of small-town America suddenly reveals an unmitigated horror at its heart? 

In which the world of appearance is subtended by a darker, malevolent reality? Where does dream end and reality begin if characters do not know or cannot recognize the nature of their own desire? What does it mean for an image to look back at you in the dark and confront you with the evidence of your own voyeurism?  Such discomfiting questions are made even more difficult by the elusive power of Lynch’s work, which refuses categorically to explain itself or normalize its meanings. Our task in this course will be to consider how to make sense of these cinematic works—to interpret them without domesticating or reducing their peculiar power. To this end, we will draw upon various theoretical languages—psychoanalysis, affect theory, feminism, genre studies, disability studies, media and film theory, transcendental meditation, among many others—in order to supplement and extend our engagement with the films’ often difficult motifs of violence, perversity, and the nature of evil. Please note that this course will be reading intensive as we bring these often demanding theoretical texts into critical conversation with the films. Lynch’s work will also make us confront the problem of our own interpretive activity directly: what do these films want from us, and what do we want as we compulsively watch them?  We will discuss Lynch’s major works, from Eraserhead (1977) through the television series Twin Peaks (1990-1) to the trio of Hollywood films Lost Highway (1997), Mulholland Drive (2001) and Inland Empire (2006), as well as some of his shorter experimental films and writings.

**Please note that this course deals with graphic representations of violence and sexuality. All of Lynch’s films are provocative and disturbing. Viewer discretion (and course participation) is strongly advised if you find the viewing and discussion of these topics difficult. Although we will critically interrogate the nature of this imagery as a primary component of our academic discussion of the films, please choose another course if this subject matter is too difficult to encounter.


Representing the Holocaust

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 424H/421H 4 Credits

CRN 37060 1200 - 1350 TR PLC 248

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

The magnitude and unique character of the Holocaust raised questions about the human condition and the human nature, about the divine and its relationship to mankind. The Holocaust defies human comprehension and logic, and challenges language’s expressive powers. Indeed, the extension of its horror cannot be fully expressed or transmitted, and yet, it must be.

But how to represent it? How to say the unspeakable? How can art mediate this reality? How can art help in remembering this reality? Can literature, or, more so, poetry, make the past present, rescue it from oblivion? How can we remember what we have not lived? How can we remember other people’s memories through art?

 These are some of the questions that we will ask in this Honors College colloquium on representations of the Holocaust. This course will center on literary responses to the Holocaust, embracing a transnational perspective, and including writers from first, second and third generation. We will cover different genres, but our main focus will be poetry, a genre that has been overlooked in Holocaust literature courses, and yet is referred to time and again in Adorno’s oft repeated claim that writing poetry after Auschwitz is obscene. We will then interrogate the limits of representation, the perils of aestheticization of tragedy and genocide, the powers of mixing craft and emotion, the force of poetic mediation, and the role of poetry in Holocaust remembrance. Among the corpus we will include Primo Levi, Dan Pagis, Paul Celan, Abraham Sutzkever, Nelly Sachs, Irving Feldman, Miklós Radnóti, and Charles Reznikoff. We will bring more latitude to our approach, as we will also include works from Latin America, specifically, Brazil: short-stories by Samuel Rawet and Moacyr Scliar, and poems by Nelson Ascher (the latter, from 2nd generation).

Another aim of this course is to read some Sephardic literary responses to the Holocaust, an overlooked topic in Holocaust courses. Most Holocaust studies focus solely on Jews from Eastern Europe, and the Sephardim (Jews whose origins are in the Iberian Peninsula) are excluded from the major Holocaust narrative, as it is usually perceived that Sephardim were not affected by it. In this course we will review the place the Sephardic experience has in the narrative of the Holocaust and, ultimately, of Jewish history. Some of the texts we will read speak against the marginalization of the Sephardic experience from literary anthologies, and from the public consciousness of Jews and non-Jews alike. We will read texts originally written in Hebrew, Ladino (Judeo-Spanish), French, and Greek, from authors spanning from Salonika, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Israel, Bosnia, France, and the US. Those include Bouena Sarfatty-Garfinkle, Moshe HaElion, Henriette Asseo, Clarisse Nicoïdski, Margalit Matitiahu, Avner Perez and Linda Ashear. It will be clear from the corpus chosen that both, as single author’s poetry or as oral poetry created in the camps, poetry has been the genre favored by Sephardic authors to express their experience with the Holocaust. Time permitting, we will cover Israeli popular singer Yehuda Poliker’s album, Dust and Ashes, the first music album devoted to the Holocaust in Israel.

Readings will be in English but students who have the option of reading works in the original language will be encouraged to do so.

Inside Out Prison Exchange: Autobiography as Political Agency

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 424H/431H 4 Credits

CRN 32639 1800 - 2050 M Salem

Professor: Anita Chari

This course is open only to CHC students, and requires an application, interview and instructor approval to register for this course.  If you are not familiar with the Inside-Out Program, please check out the information on the Honors College website here:  http://honors.uoregon.edu/story/inside-out-prison-exchange-program and watch the Inside-Out documentary here: http://vimeo.com/5193052 

Graduation Requirement:  This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and an Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance (IP) Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

An Information Session will be held on Thursday, February 11, at 4 p.m., in 203 Chapman Hall.  

The Application is available on Clark Honors College Canvas, under "Modules/Resources & Opportunities.”  Application due by 4:30 p.m., Monday, February 15, 2016.

Interviews will be held February 16-19, and students are notified of their standing by end of Week 8. 

This class will be held on Mondays, 6:00-8:50 p.m., inside the Oregon State Correctional Institution in Salem; transportation will be provided.  We'll leave campus between 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. and return by 10:20 p.m., with class being held from 6:00-8:50 p.m.  The date of the first day of class TBD.

This class explores the autobiography as a form of both personal and political expression. We begin by complicating, questioning and demystifying the divide between the personal and political by linking students' personal stories and histories with narratives of broader social structures, such as capitalism, patriarchy, slavery, and colonialism. We will read autobiographies from diverse sources, including memoirs, quasi-fictionalized autobiographies, poetry, and autobiographies of political activists. We will also engage with theories of social structure and agency in order to learn about the interface between personal experience and political agency. Finally, we delve into trans-generational narratives in order to think about social structure and agency across time and space.  In this course, we will view the autobiography as a vehicle for making personal experience something that is politically significant.  The autobiography, one could say, births political agency, hence our course title, “Autobiography as Political Agency.” We are reading autobiographies to learn about how the autobiography as a form creates possibilities for both individual and collective agency.

Students will produce a significant body of writing in class and in homework assignments in order to create their own (political) autobiographies. Authors that we read in the class include the following: Gloria Anzaldua, Hannah Arendt, Iris Young, Assata Shakur, Frantz Fanon, Albie Sachs, Malcolm X, Aimé Cesaire, James Baldwin, Robin D.G. Kelley, and Sigmund Freud.

Digital Scholarship

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 431H 4 Credits

CRN 37022 0830 - 0950 TR CHA 303

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

New technologies and techniques are fundamentally changing scholarly practices and students not engaging important questions raised by these developments are not prepared for the academic landscapes ahead. This course prepares CHC students to achieve their greatest potential as scholars by increasing their understanding of scholarly knowledge production, dissemination, evaluation, and access. Through a combination of readings, lectures, individual assignments, and a group project, students become competent digital scholars. The course embodies some of the changes in scholarship it describes. 

Students completing this course are adept at navigating scholarly communications systems (SCS), from the traditional world of academic journals indexed in academic databases, using bibliographies and citation management, to cutting-edge digital techniques that afford new modes of scholarly knowledge production, including network analytics and text mining. Students also learn advanced search theories and techniques, digital ethics, appropriate peer review, and standards for attribution and citation. Students execute advanced techniques to exploit UO library digital resources. Students complete a collaborative digital liberal arts project.


Examining Education: Schooling as the Intersection of Self, Society, Ethics, and Imagination

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 431H 4 Credits

CRN 32641 1600 - 1720 TR ANS 193

Professor: Jerry Rosiek

As the old saying goes, “A fish would be the last creature to discover water” because they are immersed in it so completely they don’t even notice it. Similarly, education is one of the most challenging social phenomena to reflect upon, because most of us are immersed in schooling environments from a very early age. We take the current configuration of educational institutions for granted and thus miss many possibilities for imagination and ambition in educational moments. The University of Oregon, however, is home to one of the most highly ranked Education Departments in the world, a leader in developing innovative and effective educational practices as well as imaginative critiques of schooling as we know it. The UO specializes in teaching fish to recognize the water in which they live—and to improve it. This course will begin with an auto-biographical inventory of students’ educational experiences. Students are invited to compare and contrast their experience to other accounts of educational experiences as well as to classic and contemporary debates about the purpose of education. The course features visits by scholars on campus who will discuss their programs of research on education. Our goal is to appreciate the personal and social drama of educational processes through a variety of disciplinary lenses. Students collaborate to develop a design for education as it might be practiced in the future. The course closes by introducing students to a variety of career paths in the field of education practice, policy, and scholarship.

From Pushkin to Viktor Tsoi: Russian, Soviet, and Post-Soviet Literature and Culture (1830s-1990s)

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 434H/421H 4 Credits

CRN 32642 1000 - 1120 MW CHA 303

Professor: Susanna Lim

Graduation RequirementThis class fulfills the following requirement: an Arts & Letters Colloquium (421H) and an International Cultures (IC) Multicultural classIf the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class. 

This course serves both as an introductory survey, as well as an in-depth analysis, of Russian literature and culture beginning from the nineteenth-century “Golden Age” of Russian literature to the Soviet period and up to the post-Soviet era (1830s-1990s).

Our reading list includes works by Alexander Pushkin’s (1820s and 30s), Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment (1866), Leo Tolstoy’s A Prisoner of the Caucasus (1872), Mikhail Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita (1928-40), Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, and Liudmila Ulitskaya’s Sonechka (1992). We will also discuss films of the Soviet period such as Circus (1936) and A Woman Prisoner of the Caucasus (1967), as well as a children’s poem (Mr. Twister) and the songs of the Soviet rock musician Viktor Tsoi (1980s).

Students will be evaluated on the basis of 1) one final critical research paper, 2) a small group presentation in which they lead in a discussion of a work, and 3) other assignments and activities such as active participation in class discussions and short writing responses.


Inventing Confucius

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 434H/431H 4 Credits

CRN 36801 1400 - 1650 W CHA 303

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

Graduation RequirementThis class fulfills the following requirement: a Social Science Colloquium (431H) and an International Cultures (IC) Multicultural classIf the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class. 

When did Confucius become Chinese? Everywhere we turn, from business reports to political analysis, Confucianism is used to convey a set of family and social values presumed to be the core of Chinese civilization, and hence China’s recent economic success.  This course introduces recent scholarship that challenges us to think critically about the uses and misuses of a term that has entered into global discourse.  Beyond deconstructing the history of Confucianism, our goal is to ask if any aspects of the political philosophy associated with Confucianism offer a meaningful critique of our contemporary global problems.  To conduct our inquiry, we will examine a variety of sources and topics including business literature, scientific debates, art, and social development issues.  

Each student will select a research topic related to the themes of the course and present this work to the seminar.  


Italo Calvino: History, Art, and Science in the Modern World

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 434H/431H 4 Credits

CRN 37032 1600 - 1850 R CHA 303

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

Graduation RequirementThis class fulfills the following requirement: a Social Science Colloquium (431H) and an International Cultures (IC) Multicultural classIf the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class. 

World renowned Italian author,Italo Calvino (1923-1985), was born in Cuba to Italian parents whose lives were devoted to science and rational, secular thought.  Calvino traveled with his family shortly after his birth to Sanremo on the Via Francigena, at the border between Italy and France.  He studied botany at Pavia University but secretly wrote fiction and lived during the most tumultuous century of human history thus far.  By the time he died in the pilgrimage hospital of Santa Maria della Scala in Siena, Italy, Calvino lived as a journalist, novelist, and resistance fighter in World War II. 

This course focuses on selections from Calvino’s writings in various genres, including his stories that attempt to express scientific theories such as quantum physics in a literary form.  Other pieces recreate conversations between Marco Polo and Khubilai Khan, or tell the story of an Italian soldier in the Second World War who questions why it is okay to kill someone the state decides is an enemy, but not someone he has good reason to consider a personal enemy. 

We will look at the political, intellectual, and personal issues of modernity through Calvino’s letters, essays, and fiction. 

Each student will select a research topic related to the themes of the course and present this work to the seminar. 

Algebra and Number Theory - A Historical-Cultural Exploration

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 32643 1400 - 1520 MW GSH 103

Professor: Shlomo Libeskind

This seminar explores the development of Algebra and Number Theory through the ages, from its primitive origins in Egypt and ancient Babylon, to Greek geometric algebra as manifested in Euclid’s Elements. We also look at Chinese, Indian, and Islamic contributions (the word algebra is a Latin variant from the Arabic al-jabr) to Algebra’s progress in Medieval Europe to the frontiers of the 19th century. We explore the historical aspects, in part through viewing beautifully presented short video lectures such as “Number Theory in Euclid Elements” and “Algebra Becomes the Science of Symmetry” from the Great Courses company. 

The seminar is accessible to any honors college student with a good basic knowledge of high school pre-calculus mathematics. Our focus is mathematical but does not assume previous experience with proof. We will discuss strategies for approaching proofs and solving problems and guide students toward successfully solving unfamiliar problems on their own. We will explore the following: 

• How does one know how to begin a proof or a solution and how to proceed?

Which approach is more promising and why?

Are different solutions possible, and how do they compare? 

We will emphasize that proofs and solutions to problems don’t come “out of the blue” and will discuss the thinking process leading to a proof or solution. Topics include the development of elementary algebra from antiquity to the Renaissance and topics in Number Theory from the times of Euclid and Diophantus to Gauss in the 18th century. We will use the text Number Theory and its History (by Oystein Ore, Dover $15.85) as well as handouts and internet resources. Most of the evaluation (80%) is by weekly assignments and short class presentations.


Bioinspired Design

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 32644 1400 - 1650 M WIL 112

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

Over the course of 3.8 billion years, through the process of evolution, organisms have “invented” solutions to deal with complex problems in the natural world.  How do geckos manage to adhere to a surface when they are upside down?  How do fish schools swim in an organized formation to conserve energy?  How do prairie dogs keep their burrows cool?  In this course, we explore basic biological and physical principles to understand how nature has solved these problems and others.  We will then think across disciplines to consider how we can apply an understanding of how biological systems work to solve engineering or design problems.  An example of a bioinspired product is LotusanTM-- a self-drying, self-cleaning paint inspired by the surface properties of lotus leaves. 

Through case studies from the primary literature that exemplify how organisms deal with problems in the natural world, lab exercises, demonstrations, writing exercises and discussion we will develop critical thinking and an understanding of the scientific process.  Early in the course we will organize into interdisciplinary teams, each of which will work to identify a design challenge and look to nature to develop a unique solution.  The course culminates with a written project and an oral presentation to share findings with the class. 

Objectives:

             An understanding of how science works through observations and hypothesis testing

•             Experience with writing about and presenting scientific data

•             Basic scientific literacy so that you can evaluate science stories you read in the media

•             Familiarity with reasoning across disciplines in teams to come up with novel solutions


Oxygen

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 441H 4 Credits

CRN 36678 1400 - 1520 TR CHA 303

Professor: Victoria DeRose

Oxygen, the breath of life, once poisoned the earth. The Great Oxygenation Event of 2.3 billion years ago that gave us an oxygenic atmosphere is also termed the Great Catastrophe, reflecting the struggle for survival that resulted in our ability to, ultimately, survive and now rely on a molecule that is created through the power of sunlight in photosynthesis. This Colloquium uses the natural history and the science of oxygen as a guiding theme to explore topics ranging from adaptation and lifespan to fermentation and fuel cells. We will first review the chemical properties of the molecule, its geological record, and its critical roles in shaping biology, both current and extant, along with the history of its discovery by Western science in the late 1700’s. The latter is even the topic of a play by contemporary scientists Djerassi and Hoffman, who illuminate the early science and protagonists in context of historical social structures.  The class will then explore contemporary topics wherein oxygen plays a central role, such as the challenge of controlled oxygen reduction in fuel cells, artificial life forms including blood substitutes, and how experts use oxygen content to control quality in beer, wine, and food fermentation. Class activities include readings from current scientific literature, the play Oxygen (Djerassi and Hoffman), and the books ‘Oxygen, a Four Billion Year History’ (Canfield, 2014) and ‘Oxygen: The Molecule that made the World’ (Lane, 2002), among others. We will use our course as a forum to interact with diverse experts from the University of Oregon scientific research community in Geology, Chemistry, and Biology, as well as members of the local community. 

Dreams and Acts of Freedom: The Civil Rights, Anti-War, and Human Rights Movements in America 1954-1968 and 1968-Today

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 444H/431H 4 Credits

CRN 32645 1400 - 1550 MW PETR 101

Professor: Daniel Miller

Graduation RequirementThis class fulfills the following requirement: a Social Science Colloquium (431H) and an American Cultures (AC) Multicultural classIf the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class.

The vote is the ultimate civil right in a Democracy - Taylor Branch, Parting the Waters, America in the King Years 

Between 1954, when Brown v Board struck down separate but equal and the Montgomery Bus Boycott struck a blow against public transport segregation and introduced the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to the world, and 1968 when poverty, protests, and riots swept the nation, the Vietnam war raged, and champions Robert F. Kennedy and Dr. King were both murdered, the United States witnessed the most dramatic and transformative movements for civil rights in its, and perhaps the world’s history.   The link between civil rights and the protests over Vietnam is not often discussed explicitly, but Congressman John Lewis maintains that the shootings at Kent State were one of three most important civil rights events in the 20th century—because they demonstrated that American administrators would go to the length of firing on students to stop the protests, what Reagan thought of as an inevitable bloodbath. 

This course tells the story of those turbulent and transformative movements and times and their relation to the present and future nationally and internationally. 

The murder of Emmet Till, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Little Rock Nine, the nationwide cafeteria sit ins, the Freedom Riders, Project C in Birmingham, the murder of Medgar Evers, the bombing murder of four little girls, and the March on Washington preceded it, Bloody Sunday and the Selma Marches, the Civil Rights act of 1964, the Voting Rights act of 1965, Martin Luther King’s and Civil Rights movement protests against the Vietnam War, and the murders of RFK and Martin Luther King in 1968, and the murder of students at Kent State and Jackson State in 1970 were all part of the Civil Rights Movement, and that movement then continued to inspire the disenfranchised here and abroad to work for civil and human rights today.  The dismantling of the Voting Rights act, the institution of draconian ID, stand your ground, and voter legislation laws sweeping the country, the denial of immigrant rights, the unprecedented incarceration of Black Americans in the racist war on drugs, and the widening income gap are civil rights issues in the US today.  And, the anti-apartheid movement in South-Africa, the protests of the poor and disenfranchised in the Arab Spring movements, the Israeli Palestinian non-violent protest movements, and fights for women and children’s rights in the middle east, Africa, Southeast Asia and throughout the world are all related to and influenced by the fundamental quest for, and processes of the Civil Rights movement in the US. 

These are incredible stories that form the fabric of our American lives and inform the fabric of the wave of international civil and human rights movements here and throughout the world today.  

This class studies the US Civil Rights, Anti-war and the International Civil and Human Rights movements inspired by the US Movements today throughout the world today.  It will utilize key texts, including Taylor Branch’s Pulitzer Prize- winning trilogy on the Civil Rights movement America in the King Years, Loren Baritz’s classic Backfire: A History of How American Culture Led us into Vietnam and Made us Fight the Way we Did, and the Jack Donnelly text on International Human Rights.  It will focus study on the films of the Civil Rights and International Human Rights movement including the groundbreaking and astonishing Henry Hampton’s, Eyes on the Prize, James Blue’s The March, Stanley Nelson’s Emmett Till, The Black Press: Soldiers without Swords, Freedom Riders, Freedom Summer, and Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, Orlando Bagwell’s Citizen King, Peter Davis’s Hearts and Minds, Julia Bacha’s Budrus and others to consider and to tell the story of the US Civil Rights and Anti-War Movements and their effect on international Civil and Human Rights in the past and present here and throughout the world.  

Students will read assigned texts, view and discuss films and issues in class, make weekly reports on research and film screenings, produce a group PowerPoint performance and presentation with multi-media and film at the end of class, and write one research paper focusing on films and events and based on the materials they have researched, viewed, analyzed and recorded. 

Note: The intent is also to have such scholars, filmmakers, and movement veterans as Taylor Branch, Stanley Nelson, Jon Else, Orlando Bagwell, Julian Bond and perhaps even John Lewis speak to the class via Skype.

 

Thesis Prospectus

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 477H 2 Credits

CRN 32648 1200 - 1350 W CHA 303
CRN 32649 1400 - 1550 M CHA 303

Professor: Susanna Lim

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.


NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, available on the CHC Canvas, only after formulating, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited.


Students who do not file applications in a timely manner are asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator. 



Thesis Prospectus

Spring term, 2015-2016
HC 477H 2 Credits

CRN 32647 1000 - 1150 F CHA 303

Professor: TBA/Staff

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.


NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, available on the CHC Canvas site, only after formulating, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 


Students who do not file applications in a timely manner are asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.