Spring 2015 Course Descriptions

Earthquakes

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 209H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 36815 10:00-11:20 TR CHA 307

Professor: Eugene Humphreys

While earthquakes are both terrifying and awesome short-duration events, the understanding of what they are is a fascinating story of scientific discovery that is occurring still. In this class we will step through the evermore sophisticated observations and hypotheses to develop the ideas of what an earthquake is, why they occur, how seismic and tsunami waves propagate, and what is and is not (yet) predictable. In conjunction, we will also study how the human endeavor to understand earthquakes has developed progressively, though often erratically, into a more-or-less comprehensive theory -- and one that remains incomplete in important ways. Oregon earthquakes will be given special attention, especially the history of great earthquakes in the region (and the history of their discovery in the geologic record).

The class will consist of four hours of lecture, discussion and in-class problem solving per week. Grading will be based two exams, a term paper, in-class and out-of-class exercises, and class participation. Students will read from both lay and scientific literature. This class has no prerequisites, and requires only curiosity, critical thinking, and a willingness to discuss.

“Build My Gallows High”: Written and Cinematic Noir

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 223H 4.00 Credits

CRN 32618 1600-1720 MW ANS 192

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

Mystery editor Otto Penzler once said about noir that it is “virtually impossible to define, but everyone thinks they know it when they see it.”  Situated at a crossroads of visual and print media—sped along by the consequences of one war, and solidified by observations made as another war ended—noir is a signifier that seems meant to avoid being pinned down.  We do know that noir is generally grounded in big themes:  class, gender, race, corruption, alienation, subjectivity, and free will, to name a few.  Focused on narrative fiction as well as visual media (some paintings, but mostly film), this section of HC 223H examines the term noir as often used to describe both writing and film.  Over the term, we will work together to flesh out the historical, cultural, and critical contexts/frameworks necessary to unpack this strange, often unwieldy term noir; we will also examine why noir continues to appeal to writers, readers, film-goers, and gamers today.

Readings span the 20th & 21st centuries.  Primary written texts include brief novels or novellas by James M. Cain (The Postman Always Rings Twice), Raymond Chandler (The Big Sleep), Georges Simenon (The Widow), Philip Kerr (March Violets), and Megan Abbott (Queenpin), as well as short stories by James Ellroy, David Goodis, Cornell Woolrich, Lawrence Block, Hughes Allison, and Joe Gores.  Films include F. W. Murnau’s Sunrise (1924), Jacques Torneur’s Out of the Past (1947), Roman Polanski’s Chinatown (1974), The Wachowskis’ Bound (1997), and Nicolas Refn’s Drive (2011).  Secondary texts include short essays (Abbott, Chandler, Paul Schrader, Karen Hollinger) selected to help contextualize the readings and films, as well as a few brief selections from longer pieces (Peter Selz, Alain Silver et. al., Richard Taylor, Émile Durkheim) that are broadly germane to the theme and approach of the course.  Note that a significant amount of the secondary reading in this course will be material that students discover through guided research.  Coursework includes group presentations, semi-weekly assignments/journal entries, a research proposal, an annotated bibliography, and a research paper of 10-12 pages.

Endgame, Wasteland, and Apocalypse: Literature at the End of History

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 223H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32613 08:30-09:50 TR CHA 303
CRN 32614 10:00-11:20 TR CHA 303

Professor: Casey Shoop

Literature has always been obsessed with the end of the world, but this “sense of ending” is also assumed to offer some imaginary and critical purchase on the world as it is. How does the present appear when it becomes the past of an imagined future? Our course will examine a range of endtimes literary and cinematic texts from across the twentieth century—a period particularly full of apocalyptic thinking.

We will be especially interested in what these texts, far from escaping their historical moment, suggest and reveal about their own contemporaneity: what kinds of aesthetic, historical, political and ethical concerns are involved in literature that imagines the end of history? How do questions of reception and genre bear upon the imaginative orientation of these works? Along the way we will address some theoretical currents in philosophy, ecology and risk, as well as the histories of modernization and globalization. Possible authors and texts include T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, William Butler Yeats’s selected poems, Samuel Beckett’s “Endgame,” David Markson’s Wittgenstein’s Mistress, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake among many others. Possible films include Terry Giliam’s “Brazil,” George Romero’s “Night of the Living Dead,” Alfonso Cuarón’s “Children of Men” among many others.

Contemporary British Writing

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 223H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32615 08:30-09:50 MW GSH 103

Professor: Helen Southworth

This course will introduce students to contemporary British fiction, non-fiction and possibly some film and TV. We’ll explore these works from a variety of perspectives: literary, historical, socio-cultural. Writers will include Robert McFarlane, Phillip Hoare, W.G. Sebald, Ian McEwan, Zadie Smith, Caryl Phillips and Kazuo Ishiguro. Workload will include in-class presentations and a substantial final project.

Is Tragedy (Still) Possible?

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 223H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32616 10:00-11:20 TR PETR 102

Professor: Sander Goldberg

The Greeks certainly had the word, but what they called ‘tragedy’ and how we apply the term are not necessarily the same. What circumstances are truly ‘tragic’ and what creative works might today be called ‘tragedies’? Is tragedy even possible in a world where ideas of human responsibility and free will, divine power and divine will, and what constitutes a life well lived are matters more of contention than agreement? This course will take its bearings from some old Greek ideas with a quick look at Aristotle’s analysis of tragedy in the Poetics and the Electra plays of Sophocles and Euripides and then move quickly on to nineteenth- and twentieth-century examples of plays and novels that can make some claim to being called ‘tragic’. The class will end with the selection and analysis of three films that may (or may not) also embody modern ideas of tragedy.

Tentative readings: Aristotle, Poetics; Sophocles, Electra; Euripides, Electra; O’Neill, Mourning Becomes Electra; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Williams, A Streetcar Named Desire; Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge; McEwan, Amsterdam

Reading Cities

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 223H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32619 14:00-15:20 TR GSH 103

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

This course explores literature of the city since the early nineteenth century. It examines questions of race, power and space in the representations of the individual and the crowd, highlighting the role of the urban observer. Students should be prepared to read and write attentively and rigorously, to work collaboratively on oral and written projects, and produce a research project connected to one of the course texts. Texts may include The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louise Stevenson, Passing by Nella Larsen, The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler, and/or Maud Martha by Gwendolyn Brooks.

Forgery, Lies, and Deception in Medieval Historical Documents

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 233H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32621 12:00-13:20 MW CHA 307
CRN 32624 14:00-15:20 MW CHA 307

Professor: Michael Peixoto

As a graduate student, my advisor once told me that a forged document is a perfect document. Every other type of record is, at best, a written approximation of a real action.  The limitations of the page, the scribe, and the circumstances of the writing experience force the writer to include certain things and not others.  Thus the resulting document always has within it the particular choices of the author, and lacks the totality of the real life act.  It is in some sense, a copy of reality.  Conversely, in the case of a forgery, the creation of a written record is the act.  It is its own reality; even if everything it reports is bogus.

The issue of forgery is central to many of the most important aspects of medieval history.  Some of the foundational documents relating to the medieval growth of the papacy were forgeries that were not discovered until centuries later.  Hundreds of landed charters, accounting for large pieces of the kingdom of England, were forged in the immediate wake of the Norman conquest of 1066.  Some scholars have estimated that as many as 50% of all documents from the Carolingian period were forged.  In addition to these overt cases of intentional deception, medieval people also struggled with the ideas of authorship, authority, and legitimacy regarding many key elements of medieval culture.  Theological writing, personal letters, religious objects, and narrative chronicles all posed issues of truth and falsehood for medieval people.  While fascinating in their own rights, the issues presented by forgery to both medieval people and modern scholars can offer methodological insight for the interpretation of historical texts in general.

As the research component of the three-part honors history series, the primary goal of this class is to develop the intellectual tools necessary for independent inquiry into a historical topic of the students choosing.  Throughout the class, every student will work toward the creation of an analytical research paper based on the reading of historical sources (not necessarily forged ones).  In addition to this 10-week project, and as a means of enriching it, the class will study the intellectual, cultural, and social history of medieval forgery and ideas of veracity.  We will examine famous forged documents such as the Donation of Constantine, the use of historical chronicles as a source for political propaganda, and the correspondence with the imaginary Eastern king, Prester John.  The material of the class will explore many of the most important events of the Middle Ages: the Norman Conquest of England, the affair of Abelard and Heloise, and the Trial of the Templars among others.  The class will question the search for legitimacy in historical writing and explore the uses of fake and outright untrustworthy material.  The strategies for the critical interpretation and use of phony and deeply biased sources will prove valuable in analyzing almost any historical material and, consequently, research papers on a wide variety of topics will be welcome.

The American City

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 233H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32623 10:00-11:20 TR PETR 105
CRN 32622 12:00-13:20 TR CHA 307

Professor: Ocean Howell

In the postbellum (post-Civil War) era, the cities of the United States provided the world with a number of firsts, including the first skyscraper and the first settlement to reach a population of 10 million. At various points, American cities have been the largest, the tallest, the densest, and the wealthiest on the planet. For all of their technological and social triumphs, however, American cities have also nurtured crushing inequality, dangerous slums, and criminal economies. This course will introduce students to the history of one of the most fascinating and contradictory social forms of the modern world. Students will read about the American city from a variety of perspectives: as a design artifact, a product of architects and planners; as a political arena, a set of governmental institutions; as a system for ordering social relations, especially those of race, ethnicity, class, and gender; as a market, an engine for generating and distributing wealth; as an "entertainment machine," an engine for generating and satisfying a dizzying array of human desires; and as an underworld, a breeding ground for countercultures and criminal enterprises.

The first third of the course will focus on readings with the aim of demonstrating the variety of possible approaches to researching the American city. Students will begin thinking about the subjects and the research strategies they would like to pursue. The middle third of the course (three weeks) will be spent discussing the particular topics students have developed. Each member of the class will have an opportunity to assign a few pages of reading pertaining to the topic, give an overview of the research project, and discuss the issues involved with the rest of the class. In the final third of the course each member of the class will give a ten-minute presentation of the results of his/her research. Written assignments: prospectus and final research paper.

Forensics

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 399H 1.00-5.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32625 18:00-19:50 TR ALL 140

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

Clark Honors College hosts the nationally ranked University of Oregon Forensics Program. The program is designed to teach rhetorical habits of mind and speech through intercollegiate debate and individual events. The program travels to about thirteen tournaments, hosts two on-campus tournaments, and engages in some on-campus speaking activities. Two graduate teaching fellows are assigned to the program. Debate students will be paired with partners and will be expected to conduct extensive research on the debate topics selected by the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and the Parliamentary Debate Association. Novice and experienced student debaters are welcome.

This course is open to ALL UO students (not only Clark Honors College students) to enroll.

Thesis

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 403H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32626

Professor: TBA

Reading

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 405H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32627

Professor: TBA

Special Problems

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 406H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32628

Professor: TBA

Thesis Orientation

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32631 11:00-15:50 S 4/11 CHA 303

Professor: TBA

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad. Food and beverages will be provided.

Thesis Orientation

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32629 11:00-15:50 S 4/4 CHA 303

Professor: TBA

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad. Food and beverages will be provided.

Thesis Orientation

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32630 17:00-21:50 R 4/9 CHA 303

Professor: TBA

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad. Food and beverages will be provided.

Practicum

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 409H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32632

Professor: TBA

Virginia Woolf

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32634 10:00-11:20 MW GSH 103

Professor: Helen Southworth

This class is focused on the life and work of English writer Virginia Woolf (1882-1941). Texts will include To the Lighthouse, Orlando, A Room of One's Own, Roger Fry: A Biography, Flush and The Waves. We'll use our focus on Virginia Woolf to consider the range of approaches and research methodologies available when studying a single author and a single oeuvre. Topics will include biography and book art.

Utopias and Dystopias

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32635 12:00-13:20 TR CHA 303

Professor: Frances Cogan

This term we will deal with the fabulous (and theoretical, historic, and futuristic) Utopia and its evil twin, Dystopia. We will explore these two mostly in fiction but also through readings of additional works for oral reports (voluntary). We will consider what is and is not “Utopia” and what “Dystopia” stands for. Some say, for example, that Utopia is a workable communal society seen from the outside, while Dystopia is the Utopia seen individually from the inside. One person’s Utopia is another person’s Dystopia using the same structural principles for both forms, but with a radical change in point of view.

Class texts will include: Margaret Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale; Ray Bradbury’s Farenheit 451; Thomas More’s Utopia, Francis Bacon’s “The New Atlantis”; Yvgeny Zamyatin’s We; William Golding’s Lord of the Flies; Kurt Vonnegut’s “Harrison Bergeron”; George Orwell’s 1984; and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland.

Outside reading list for oral reports includes such philosophical, fictional, or futuristic works as Brave New World, Colonies in Space, Red Mars, Walden Two, the Constitution (specifically the Bill of Rights), The Communist Manifesto, Candide, and other works about Utopias or Dystopias, now and in the past, including the Jim Jones “People’s Temple” socialist “Utopia” in Guyana, South America (of mass suicide fame).

Two critical papers of 4-6 pages each or one paper and one oral report of 12 minutes. A Creative Project (voluntary) plus a 3-5 page introduction to it or a take-home final exam. No midterm.

WARNING: This is a research-heavy class, demanding scholarly and critical thinking skills; there will be heavy reading. Class is primarily for Juniors and Seniors.

Tolstoy's Anna Karenina

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 36913 18:00-19:50 R Salem (plus travel time)
CRN 36913 16:00-18:50 M 3/30 CHA 303

Professor: TBA

This course is open only to CHC students, and requires an application, interview, and instructor approval to register for this course. If you are not familiar with the Inside-Out Program, please check out the information on the Honors College website here: http://honors.uoregon.edu/story/inside-out-prison-exchange-program and watch the Inside-Out documentary here: http://vimeo.com/5193052.

The Application is available on the Clark Honors College Blackboard, under "Forms.” Applications will be due by 4:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9. Interviews will be held during Week 7, and students will be notified of their standing by end of Week 8.

This class will be held on Thursdays, 6:00-8:50 p.m., inside the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem; transportation will be provided. We'll leave campus sharply at 4:00 p.m. and return by 10:30 p.m. The first day of class will be held on Monday, March 30th, 4-6:50 p.m., in 303 Chapman Hall.

Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) is one of the greatest and most influential masters of the novel. The Russian literary classics of the nineteenth century, including the novels of Tolstoy, made a profound impression on Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995), perhaps the greatest philosopher of ethics of our era. Among Russian novelists, it was Dostoevsky rather than Tolstoy who was the main inspiration for Levinas’s thought. We will carefully read Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, paying special attention to what the novel has to say about ethics understood in Levinas’s sense: my inescapable responsibility for a unique and irreplaceable other. We will read Ethics and Infinity, a reasonably accessible and brief series of interviews with Levinas, and we will look for connections between Tolstoy’s fiction and Levinas’s thought. We will begin and end the class by reading Dostoevsky’s assessment of Anna Karenina in relation to what has been called “The Russian View of Human Guilt and Crime.”

This is an Inside-Out class: half the students (“inside” students) will be prison inmates and the other half will be University students (“outside” students).

Perspectives on American Manhood

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 424H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 36908 14:00-15:20 TR MCK 122

Professor: Tim Williams

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

In this colloquium, we will explore the multiple, changing, and diverse meanings of manhood in North America and the United States from the eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century. The rationale is that understanding changing attitudes, expressions, and constructions of gender—in particular masculinity—offers a unique and interdisciplinary opportunity to evaluate American culture. Ultimately, this multi-disciplinary approach should provide ample room to explore various constructions of American masculinity as well as understand the role that negative images, or opposites, played in this construction, including womanhood, slavery, boyhood, homosexuality, and racial and class differences.

We will begin with a theoretical discussion of gender, especially its foundations in women’s studies and history. Then we will explore manhood in the context of specific thematic units such as politics, family, region, race, bodies, sexuality, intellectual life, and popular culture. Expect to read and evaluate both scholarly works from a wide range of academic disciplines and primary sources, including short novels like Herman Mellville’s Billy Budd and Edgar Rice Bourroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes. Assignments will include writing book reviews of scholarly work, leading discussions based on outside reading, and at least one crucial essay on the course themes and readings.

The Animal-Human Bond in Science, Art, and History

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32638 14:00-15:20 TR CHA 307

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

Do animals make us human? How has this relationship changed over time and varied by social setting? Is separation from “the animal world” a general trend in human evolution? What can spindle cell research tell us about the capacity for empathy in whales and humans? The human-animal bond is a complex relationship, often a mix of emotional attachment and dissociation surrounded by philosophical, religious, and practical considerations. Examining historical, scientific, and artistic representations, our main goal is to understand the interplay of factors that can shape this relationship and the range of resulting consequences for both natural and social environments. Crickets were honored pets inspiring poetic expression in imperial China. Augustine argued that animals had no reason and hence their suffering was of no consequence. Jungian dream psychology associates animals with human instincts suggesting an archetypical bond. The Jataka Tales told for educational purposes recount the story of the Buddha offering his body to a starving mother tiger, so she could feed her cubs. Although Animal Planet episodes, therapy animals, and environmental crises have raised popular awareness of the animal-human bond, we hope to delve deeper, examining recent scientific work, environmental studies, cultural studies, and animal studies among other sources to find new questions and perhaps new insight. Beyond our common readings, art and film exploration, and brief written work, everyone will have the opportunity to write and present a research paper on a relevant topic of his/her choice.

Search

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 36910 10:00-11:20 MW PLC 361

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

Search techniques are as old inquiry itself. Yet in recent years, tremendous attention has been focused in this area, as Internet services have found new ways to implement and monetize search. In this course, we will place new search technology in a long historical framework in order to better understand the interaction of old and new forms of inquiry in the information age.

Japanese Youth Culture: Explaining Disaster and Defining Nation

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 434H/421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 36894 14:00-15:20 TR CHA 303

Professor: Alicia Freedman

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural course.

Through innovative study of a wide range of texts, we will explore how culture for children reflects adult values, defines notions of home, and teaches us how to be human. In light of news events, especially the March 11, 2011 triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown and the Japanese government's promotion of popular culture to bolster the economy, we will focus on two related themes: 1) how literature helps children cope with natural disasters, war, and trauma and 2) the globalization of youth culture. We will consider how children's stories present solutions to social issues and provide insight into psychology. We will look at how women and men of different age groups around the world have used Japanese children's culture to form new communities, make statements about gender and identity, and overturn stereotypes. This seminar has been inspired by the idea that youth who came of age in the 1990s grew up consuming Japanese culture and is nostalgic about their own childhoods in ways different from other generations. Our course texts were made for children or young adults and thereby present another side of the creation, marketing, and consumption of culture. Course readings are limited to what is currently available in English, and we will discuss why certain works are translated and how this affects how we in the United States perceive Japanese youth.

To cover several topics in a short academic term, we will adopt a case study approach and introduce key issues through use of examples. Class meetings will be comprised of short lectures, followed by discussion of important texts, issues, and debates. To gain more firsthand knowledge, become better researchers, and apply course themes to our own lives, we will meet with experts from various fields who use Japanese culture and will tour UO archives related to Japan. To foster learning both inside and outside the classroom, we will take advantage of campus events, including visits by authors and research colloquia. Prior knowledge of Japanese culture and language is helpful but not required. All readings and discussions will be in English. The syllabus can be adapted to fit the interests of the class.

Cosmology

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32644 9:00-9:50 MWF CHA 303

Professor: James Schombert

Cosmology, the study of the formation and evolution of the Universe, has progressed from its origins in early man's ideas of Nature, to Chinese and Greek worldviews, to Dante's vision of Heaven and Hell, to Newton's Clockwork Universe. Today, cosmology has entered a Golden Age with the launch of numerous space telescopes and development of technology that allows us to study the echo of the Big Bang. In addition to exploring the processes behind the origin of spacetime and matter, the science of cosmology has also expanded to resolve a number of philosophical and theological issues, such as Creation (i.e. Genesis 1:1) and the anthropic principle. This course is a historical and philosophical review of our cosmological worldview from mythical times to modern science. We will explore topics in the geometry of the Universe, expanding spacetime and the Big Bang, dark matter, black holes and wormholes, quarks and mesons, galaxies and quantum physics. Our goal is to provide the student with a summary of our current understanding of astrophysics as it relates to the structure of the Universe and what topics remain to be explored in the 21st century. The material is presented without complex mathematics, but an understanding of basic geometry and algebra is helpful.

Geology and Biology of the Tibetan Plateau

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 37226 10:00-11:20 MW CHA 303

Professor: Samantha Hopkins

Central Asia is home to the highest mountains in the world, and the elevation and relief of the Tibetan Plateau is unequalled anywhere else on Earth. Its impact on global climate traces back perhaps 65 million years, and continues through the present day. This remarkable structure affects a vast swath of the surrounding land and oceans; it is the origin of some of the planets largest rivers: the Yangtze, the Mekong, the Ganges, the Indus, and the Yellow River. Its ongoing uplift creates earthquakes in western China, Kyrgyzstan, India, Pakistan, and surrounding countries. This region is also home to a remarkable array of unusual plants and animals adapted to the high elevations and harsh conditions. Human history here has also been shaped by the geology of the area, where the Silk Road passed through rugged terrain in sustaining trade between East and West.


In this class, we will study the geologic origins of Central Asia's unusual geologic structures, and the implications of its unique geologic properties for ongoing geologic and biological processes. We'll take a look at why this area is so different from everywhere else on earth, and what we can learn about natural processes from the study of this extreme geology. We'll also tie the geological and biological features of this region to some of the sociopolitical implications of this dynamic area. Class activities will primarily feature discussion of primary literature, mostly in natural schience but with some forays into the social sciences. Grades will be based on class participation, written analysis of the papers we read, and a term project that includes both a research paper and a short in-class presentation.


U.S. Civil Rights: Past and Present

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 444H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32645 14:00-15:20 MW CHA 303

Professor: Daniel Miller

Course Description forthcoming.

Understanding the Nineteenth-Century South

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 444H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 37004 14:00-15:20 WF CHA 204

Professor: Tim Williams

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class.

The South is perhaps the most mythologized region in the United States, as countless works of fiction, history, film, and journalism reveal. Indeed, the beginning of the twenty-first has seen a renewed interest in this region’s past, as Americans commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, consider the lasting effects of American slavery and emancipation, and seek to understand a resurgence of racial violence throughout the nation. It is imperative, then, that we today understand the nineteenth-century South.

This course explores both the history of the South as well as the history of ideas about the South. We will explore these interrelated issues from the perspective of nationalism, the nineteenth-century’s most prescient and enduring global issue. In the process, we will explore how southerners and northerners viewed and grappled with this region as part of a global order in which a host of issues took on a southern accent: slavery, mastery, honor, race, regionalism, intellectual life, and popular culture. We will read a variety of scholarly books and articles on the topic, as well as a variety of primary sources. Assignments will include writing book reviews of scholarly work, leading discussions based on outside reading, and at least one crucial essay on the course themes and readings.

Thesis Prospectus

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32646 10:00-11:50 F CHA 303

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass. NOTE: HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization. Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project. The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.

Thesis Prospectus

Spring term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 32647 17:00-18:50 T CHA 303

Professor: Terry Hunt

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass. NOTE: HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization. Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project. The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.