Fall 2015 Course Descriptions

Behavioral Economics

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.00 Credits

CRN 12725 1900-1950 W GSH 130

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

Student Leader:  Tia Monahan

Disclaimer: This class will not tell you how to behave. Another Disclaimer: This class might change how you behave. Behavioral Economics is a sub-field of “the dismal science” that is economics. Focusing on the psychology of why people make decisions, behavioral economics opens up different ways of thinking about everyday decisions, like what you order at a restaurant or how you choose a student loan. In this class, we will be reading chapters from Dan Ariely’s Predictably Irrational, a behavioral economics book that applies the field to everyday goings on as well as public policy issues. We will apply these different lessons to current issues and use this class as an informal forum for discussion and debate. The CHIP program is also designed as an introduction to the Honors College and the University as a whole, so we will put a big emphasis on getting used to the school as well as the city of Eugene. I hope to be a significant resource for everyone in this class by helping you all navigate the university and help ease your transition into college.

Cheap Scares: B-Picture American Horror

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12721 1900-1950 R GSH 130

Professor: Sander Goldberg

Student Leader: John Giacoppe


American horror films are easy to stereotype and dismiss; however, with careful analysis, astute watchers can uncover blood-drenched critiques of societal norms, the realm of the individual, the soul opposed to the spirit and many more nuanced topics. In this course, students will watch a film a week spanning from the 30's to the 90's, and meet in class to discuss them in depth. Each film will be a horror film made outside of the major studios on a low budget. To facilitate the discussions students will go through a preliminary film analysis primer, along with a few short historical notes throughout the term. Students will film their own short horror themed segment as a final project, to be played for the class. Films viewed will include "Silent Night, Bloody Night", "White Zombie", "Carnival of Souls", and more.


Cochran & Kardashian: An Appeal to 5th Grade Logic

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12730 1800-1850 T GSH 132

Professor: David Frank

Student Leaders: Greg Mina and Charles Steenkolk

“If the glove doesn’t fit, you must acquit”; eight of the most controversial words spoken in an American courtroom. These words were central in the O.J. Simpson criminal trial, and  they yield insight into the defense attorney’s rhetorical and thematic approach to defending their client, O.J. Simpson. Using a timeless legal strategy, the attorneys simplified their arguments to be understood by a 5th grader, a rhetorical technique proven to be very effective.


In this CHIP, you will learn the skill of trial advocacy through examination of the trial techniques demonstrated in the O.J. Simpson murder trial. Together, we will read, watch, and discuss crucial moments from the trial, and learn about the American legal system as a whole. In the process, we will prepare and put on our own ‘mock trial’ (Diggory v. Hogwarts), and learn the crucial skill of advocacy, a skill that will serve you well throughout your CHC career. Trial advocacy is noble art, one that requires thorough preparation, practice, and integrity. Trial advocacy is 2,000 years old, and its principles can be found in the ancient works of Aristotle and Cicero. Together we’ll learn about this famous trial, develop our advocacy skills, and how to get involved in the University and CHC community!


Dynamic Design: The Human-Centered Design Process and You

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12720 1800-1850 T CHA 307

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Student Leader: Lydia Bales


Does design have the power to change the world? How can design solve problems in ways that traditional strategies cannot? This CHIP will focus on the importance and prevalence of design in your everyday life, not only of objects but in everything we do, including social change. The structure of our class will analyze the design process and explore the ways in which the creative process can be an effective problem solving strategy in any field. The goal of our class is to work as a team to create social change through design, and to approach problems with a creative and interdisciplinary understanding. This class is open to all majors who have a desire to collaborate and gain skills, making us effective to solve the problems facing our modern world with creativity.


From Primetime to HBO: Gender and Race in Popular American Television

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12734 1700-1750 R GSH 131

Professor: TBA

Student Leader: Inina Kachelmeier

Television has existed for less than 100 years and yet it’s already hard to imagine a world without Netflix. Television is one of the many ways our society tells stories. The rules about how these stories are told have changed considerably over time. For example, just 50 years ago it was considered taboo to show a couple sleeping on the same bed or a pregnant woman on TV. The first 10 minutes of Game of Thrones is enough to prove how much regulations have changed, but the role of gender and sexuality in television continues to be complex and problematic. In this class we will be talking about the representation of gender and race in modern popular American television programs. We will be looking at TV tropes and stereotypes, inequality in representation based on gender and race, and how these inequalities have come to be accepted. Whether you just binge-watched Veronica Mars or rarely watch TV, this class will be a great opportunity to discuss contemporary topics, television through a cultural anthropology lens, and to explore the CHC community. Come prepared to discuss and share opinions.

Humans, the Environment, and the Quest for Sustainability: Different Strategies, Common Humanity

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12727 1930-2020 W GSH 131

Professor: Terry Hunt

Student Leader:  Doug Sam

The University of Oregon is one of the “greenest” and most environmentally conscious in the United States with a strong commitment towards being sustainable and just towards the environment. From our 3000 tree arboretum on campus to the composting and urban farm on campus, we are leaders and innovators, following the proud tradition of Eugene and Oregon for being environmentally friendly. This CHIP will be exploring sustainability and human-environment interactions both on and off campus. How do such systems interact, and how do societies respond when challenges arise?  We will be gathering general concepts about such interactions and compare efforts in Eugene to other examples, from ancient societies to the modern-day and critically evaluating sources from such eminent scholars as Jared Diamond to our very own Dean Terry Hunt.

Our goal is to blend anthropological, geographical, environmental science, and sociological concepts to form an interdisciplinary view of the relationship humans share with their environment. We’ll also be applying what we learn with field trips to destinations both on and off campus, including the Eugene Saturday Market (the oldest weekly open-air market of its kind in the United States!), and getting an introduction to research at the Knight Library. By exploring how differently societies adapt to their environment, we will discover what fundamentally binds us all together as humans.

International Cultures through Tea

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12726 1700-1750 T GSH 131

Professor: Mark Carey

Student Leader:  Stephanie Collins

The best thing to bring people together is a nice cup of tea—and it's been that way for centuries and worldwide. This CHIP is meant to explore international cultures through the medium of tea. Tea has greatly shaped our history, culture, literature, art, and cuisine. Thus CHIP students will explore and question how tea has shaped our history and culture as well as why we continue to drink it today. We will study tea and revolutions, tea ceremonies, the medicinal effects of tea, and extraordinary tales of tea. There will be weekly videos and short articles before each class, as well as some limited summer reading. Studying the world through tea shows us new patterns and frameworks allowing us to analyze global relations and consumer relations. The CHIP will draw on history, literature, art, and science, thereby appealing to and involving many majors. It will also teach students how to think about cultural origins, international relations, consumer behavior, and our daily decisions on drinks in entirely new ways — all while introducing students to the Clark Honors College. Best of all, every class will start with a cup of tea!

Let's Bike Eugene

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12724 1200-1250 F CHA 307

Professor: Ocean Howell

Student Leader:  Mary Vertulfo

Learn about bike safety and the rules of the road while learning to navigate Eugene by bike! This CHIP will introduce students to different neighborhoods in Eugene, teach students about how to make their way around town quickly and safely, cover basic bike maintenance, and explore the endless benefits of the two-wheeled commute. We’ll go on several group bike rides over the course of the CHIP, and we will learn about Eugene’s awesome history with bike-friendly roads. Grab your wheels, your helmet, and a positive attitude, and come have fun joining the growing community of urban cyclists in Eugene and at the U of O!

Memoir Writing

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12732 1400-1450 F CHA 303

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Student Leader:  Emma Ivie


In this course you will explore your unique voice through the genre of memoir. We will start out by looking at Allie Brosh’s memoir Hyperbole and a Half. You will have the chance to discuss the various elements that go into creating this type of creative non-fiction including: drama, hyperbole, humor, self-deprecation, vulnerability, and all of the other fun aspects of a really excellent memoir. There will also be a considerable emphasis on voice, both written and oral—meaning you will not only be developing your voice and style in your writing, but you will also have the experience of sharing your writing aloud. This course is a wonderful opportunity for us to build a creative community within the CHC, and learn more about writing and ourselves.


Oregon's Untold Stories

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12735 1600-1650 M FR 221

Professor: Susanna Lim

Student Leader:  Sarah Carey

Circa 13,000 BCE: The first Homo Sapiens stepped foot into Oregon. September 2015: You will step foot onto the University of Oregon campus. During those 15,000 years a lot has happened in Oregon – and if you want to learn about the history of the place you’ll be calling home for the next four years, then this is the CHIP for you! Together we’ll explore the history of Oregon and the UO, doing first-hand research on campus and off. We’ll visit UO’s Museum of Natural and Cultural History and see a 10,000 year-old pair of shoes. We’ll delve into the Special Collections at Knight Library and read newspapers that UO students read decades ago. As we research together, we’ll ask ourselves why some stories are remembered and others are not. For our culminating project, we’ll present the most interesting and important stories we’ve discovered. Over the summer we’ll read Sometimes a Great Notion by UO alum Ken Kesey to get started thinking about Oregon's fascinating history!

People>Computers? Technology Advancing Humanity

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12723 1700-1750 T GSH 130

Professor: Helen Southworth

Student Leader:  David Widder

Literature is wonderful. It isn't a scary subject. Computer science? Yikes! Why the dichotomy?

This CHIP will teach computational thinking to allow a fresh perspective when examining other subjects. Computational thinking is a way of solving problems and understanding human behavior by drawing upon concepts in computer science, but no (let me repeat, NO!) prior experience in CS is needed. We will read selections from a computer science chronicle, entitled The New Turing Omnibus. Each chapter is an engaging, self contained taste of how a different type of thinking can be used to solve problems in diverse fields, from Medicine to Philosophy. We'll watch Wall-E and The Matrix and then argue about them. For your final project, you will pick a problem which is interesting to you and demonstrate to the class how you could solve it using the techniques we've learned. This is a residential CHIP, meaning that you will live and learn with your peers, while living the dream of interdisciplinary scholarship.


Rhythm & Rhyme: The Poetry in Hip-Hop

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12728 1200-1250 T FR 206

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

Student Leader:  Jared Brandon

Look in the skies for God, what you see besides the smog

Is broken dreams flying away on the wings of the obscene 

Was this beautiful image crafted by Whitman? Wordsworth? Frost? The answer is none of the above! This is a lyric from the song “Respiration” by Black Star, a rap group composed of Talib Kweli and Yasiin Bey.

 

In this course we will examine rap from a musical and technical perspective, analyzing rhythm, rhyme schemes, meter, metaphor, and wordplay. We will investigate differences and similarities between rap and classical Western poetry, and learn how rap emerged from African-American oral traditions such as The Dozens. Lyrical content will be used as a medium to critically examine current events and social issues. Students should expect to leave the class with some exposure to the Eugene music scene and an expanded appreciation of the genre.


Rights, Incarceration and American Values

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12733 1800-1850 M GSH 131

Professor: Casey Shoop

Student Leaders: Lyssandra Golledge and Nina Greene


Incarceration in the United States has changed drastically over the last decades and continues to change today. This change is happening due to the reconsideration of economics — not of rights, not of ethics. Now is the time to critically examine the implications of the criminal justice system in our country. In this CHIP, we will develop practical skills with which to engage our communities in conversation about the nature of democracy in a country in which 1 out of every 31 adults is under a form of correctional control, including jail, prison, probation, or parole. The purpose of our time together is to build community while using our passions and talents to make critical social issues that affect every one of us feel relevant. Watching Orange is the New Black and reading works by Angela Davis and Glen Loury will inform our dialogue with one another, guest speakers, and individuals we meet on our field trips. We will visit two correctional institutions and participate in events both on and off campus. Welcome to the CHC community!


Statistics in Sports

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12729 1700-1750 W GSH 130

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

Student Leader:  Tyler Jorgensen

When people think about statistics their minds usually wander to complicated number sets based on data from dry sources. This CHIP is designed to open a surprising and interesting window on the world around us through a quantitative lens. You will have the chance to discuss these topics with your CHC peers in weekly discussions with the goal being to leave this class with a better understanding of the underlying numbers game of sports. You will also get the chance to see how they come into play here at the University of Oregon. But just how important can stats be? In November 2008, the sports statistics blogger, Nate Silver, correctly picked the U.S. presidential election in 49 of 50 states. The next year Time magazine placed him among the 100 most influential people in the world. In this CHIP, we will investigate the impact that statistical analysis has had on the way sports are played and the way that fans follow them. We will also look at the way numbers matter in new ways in our data-driven world. If you like data, if you like sports, or if you just like looking at the world in new ways, this CHIP is for you.

The Art of Science

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12722 1700-1750 R GSH 130

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

Student Leader:  Alyssa Bjorkquist

"Science. It is a beautiful and versatile branch of knowledge that is responsible for explaining the world around you. While you read this sentence, the Earth is hurtling around the Sun at over 10,000 miles per hour; tectonic plates are shifting miles beneath your feet; the visual centers in your brain are translating little black squiggles on this page into a comprehensible language; and the plants outside are engaging in photosynthetic reactions to produce the air you breathe! In this CHIP we will explore what it means to be a local and global scientist in the 21st century through lenses of ethics, social media communication, and education. Most importantly, we will examine why science and art are divided fields in academia with respect to their complementing and challenging personalities.

We will engage in provocative discussion, interact with a wide display of technological and artistic media, explore readings from famous scientists and artists, and even get the chance to hold a real human brain! The class will culminate in a beach trip to the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology and a final project that blends art and science in a novel format. No matter where your academic interests lie, this CHIP will help you gain a broader appreciation and knowledge for the science and art that make our world wonderful."

What's the Meaning of it all? Philosophy and Critical Thinking

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 199H 1.0 Credits

CRN 12731 1800-1850 W GSH 132

Professor: Louise Bishop

Student Leader:  Jessenia Formick

Are you living an authentic lifestyle, existing in accordance with moral standards set by yourself? Or has this agency been subdued by other bodies of ideology? This CHIP is designed to challenge the mind, encourage critical thinking as well as dynamic discussions. We will introduce excerpts of texts that often make an appearance in the history and literature sequences alongside short works by existentialist philosophers like Nietzche, Camus and Dostoevsky.  Learn to navigate UO and CHC alongside other students passionate about spirited discourse. Debate among your peers: how does the rise of American individualism hold up alongside the existential belief that everything is meaningless until given meaning? Through corroborations and contrasts, we will delve into the world of philosophy and turn a critical eye towards its role in shaping the human experience.

How Marine Organisms Work

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 4 Credits

CRN 12736 1000-1150 TR CHA 203

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

Important note: This course includes TWO MANDATORY field trips scheduled for Oct. 10 and 11 (Overnight trip to OIMB) and Nov. 7 (Day trip to Bob Creek).A beautiful and stunning diversity of organisms live beneath the ocean’s surface along the Oregon coast.  How do these organisms perform and ultimately, survive, in the marine environment?  In this course we will use a biomechanics approach (study of biological solids and fluids) to understand how body shape, material properties and movement influence interactions with the physical environment and with other organisms.  We will focus at the organism-scale and, in particular, on interactions with the fluid environment (e.g. how water movement influences predation).   Through field trips, laboratory studies, discussions and team projects we will become familiar with local marine organisms and use quantitative tools to understand organism performance and adaptation.

Hands on with the Internet of Things

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16869 1000-1120 MW DES 220

Professor: Stephen Fickas

Note:  Students will be required to bring a laptop to class. All other hardware will be supplied by the instructor.
 
The term the Internet of Things refers to the proliferation of computers into every nook and cranny of daily life. Your car has them, your home has them, your pet could have one, medical devices have them, buildings have them, factories have them, your phone is one. These devices live on the Internet, the same Internet where you find youtube, amazon, etc. This course will explore what this means in a hands-on fashion. Each student will be given a small computer (a Raspberry PI) to program. Groups will form to link their computers up to do some cool things. And then the instructor will play the bad guy and try to crash students' computers just as seen in today's headlines.
 
The course does not assume prior programming experience. The language we will use in the class is Python. You will learn the bits of Python needed to program your Raspberry PIs and to link them up with other student's PIs. As the instructor starts to attack your network of PIs, you will come up with ways of thwarting him.
 
The class will use a "flipped" style that uses class time for working on examples and problems. Students will need access to a laptop in class to follow along. This course is ideal for students who have no previous programming experience.

Hands on with the Internet of Things-LAB

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 207H 0.00 Credits

CRN 16870 1000 - 1050 F DES 220

Professor: Stephen Fickas

See course description under CRN 16869.  If you are going to register for that course, you must register for this Lab as well.

Copycats! Tradition and Originality in Western Literature

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12738 0830-0950 TR CHA 307
CRN 12740 1200-1320 TR CHA 307

Professor: Sander Goldberg

We are taught to value originality in literature, but even the greatest of western authors have for millennia begged, borrowed, and stolen from their predecessors. The resulting debts may be tacit or overt, buried deep within the creative process or shouted from the rooftops, but scratch the surface of even quite famous works and you often find the remains of some predecessor. Why is that? What does it mean for the creative process that works of literature look back to earlier works? How does the aggregate of such debts create what we call a tradition, and how does the fact of tradition shape the work of writers and the experience of readers?

This course will focus on texts with demonstrable debts to earlier texts and examine what later authors achieved by their borrowing, echoes, and appropriations. It will also consider what literary critics have said about the role of tradition in the making of literature.

Tentative Readings: Homer’s Odyssey and Vergil’s Aeneid, Plautus’ Menaechmus Twins and Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors, Chaucer’s Troilus and Creseyde and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida. Secondary readings will include essays by T.S. Eliot, E.V. Cunningham, Stanley Fish, and Harold Bloom.

Assignments will include weekly response papers, oral reports, a midterm examination, and a final essay project.

In the Beginning…

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12741 1400-1520 TR CHA 307

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

… there was sex, violence, betrayal and survival. Indeed, the world’s best-selling book has it all. And we will read some of it in this first course of the Clark Honors College Literature sequence, devoted to the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Pentateuch, or Torah (The Five Books of Moses).

Genesis is a book full of beautiful and compelling narratives that contain stories crucial to the whole of Western culture. From the creation of the world, to the creation of a nation, in Genesis the reader finds stories about conflicts between fathers and sons, husbands and wives, and favored and slighted brothers, not to mention the tensions between God and God’s creatures.

Our project is to try to forget what we think we know about Genesis and read the text with open eyes, following it slowly, carefully and closely, admiring its terseness, concreteness and poetry. We will savor the text, embracing its gaps and seeming contradictions, and seeking its overall cohesiveness. Through our reading(s) and our analysis, we will “hear” the plurivocality of the biblical text.

We will read Genesis in Robert Alter’s translation, and our focus on the book itself will be punctuated by interpretations and recreations of the biblical text by modern writers. Among the poets we will read are Emily Dickinson, Wilfred Owen, Yehuda Amichai, Dan Pagis, Jorge Luis Borges, and Louise Glück.

Literary analysis is our goal and method, but this course has a heavy writing component, so there will be many writing assignments in different genres, including opportunities for creative writing and research. Writing is a process and a skill; it needs to be practiced: students will also revise their main paper extensively, in order to understand the recursive nature of writing.

This course is not suited for those who read the Bible literally, or for those who assume that all readers of the Bible are literalists.

That’s Wild: Eco Epic and the Green Imagination

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12743 1600-1750 MW 307 CHA

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

The ecological mind is ancient as the hills, revealed in the extravagant stories first imagined by humanity coming to consciousness on earth. We will be literary detectives, exploring ecological themes in ancient through pre-modern literature, from Gilgamesh through Shakespeare. When did a green imagination appear? How is the concept of “wild” developed in earliest literature and law? When did we feel guilt--and reverence--for the earth?  What was earth like as earliest humanity began to understand life? Whether in myths or legends, from trees expressing people to Rome founded by wolves, epic literature is a lens into our understanding of how the environment is conceived and represented in earliest literature. 

In the woods, on the wine dark seas, following the yellow brick road to the Emerald City—wildness represented as witches and monsters and beasts and tempters at every bend and even in the mirror: this seminar explores the power of story to illuminate our lives as a momentous terrifying and terrific learning journey on earth. Just as in today’s culture we say “epic” to mean something enormous, whether a sandwich, wave, or adventure, we say “wild” to mean outrageous, large-scale, threatening—and threatened. As individuals and in teams, our class will read and recreate –and argue translations of--a handful of famous pre-modern classic epics featuring Homer’s The Odyssey, including Dante’s Divine Comedy, Gilgamesh, Beowulf, and two dramas of dealing with epic wildness: Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac.

Tracking today’s “classic” covers of eco epic in literature and film through the lens of our iconic green models, such as Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, and filmed stories such as Wizard of Oz, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast and Into the Woods, and Tarsem’s The Fall, we will get to the root of wildness in epic by creating our own dramatic enactments, do scholarly and critical analysis and close readings, and reflect on films and texts, in journals, poems, and essays. We will ponder classics’ enduring power as we creatively engage with the way minds make the struggle to tell us the story a heroic act. Thousands of years old, invoked by the Muse, chanted around a fire, or expressed as poetry, personal essays, lyric drama, or film musical, these works of green epic imagination have influenced historic civic heroes from John Muir, Anne Frank, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Teddy Roosevelt, The Freedom Writers, Gandhi, Nikki Giovanni, Wangari Matthai, to Dr. Paul Farmer. How can preposterous and outlandish and idiosyncratic epic scenarios about our engagement with wild earth possibly provide wisdom to us in our own lives today as we consider the fate of our planet earth? 

Through the magic mirror of green epic, works on love and war and identity and life dreams and goals use the metaphors of wildness, from Dante’s dark woods, the Walden woods where Thoreau saunters to “live deliberately,” Dorothy’s whirlwind journey in Oz, Odysseus’s turbulent seas, or the mirror in which Cyrano and the beast confront themselves. Mary Oliver asks us, “tell me, how do you plan to spend your one wild and precious life?” Eco epic thousands of years old may reveal our own lives as wild terrain—and the wild and heroic in each person’s journey of consciousness, and conscience, on earth. As earth has changed by human hand, what have we learned, and what can we learn, from the eco imagination of green epic?

Force and Law in Premodern Literature

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12744 1000-1120 TR CHA 307
CRN 12745 1200-1320 TR CHA 203

Professor: Casey Shoop

Philosopher Simone Weil famously described the Iliad as poem about force:  “that x that turns anybody who is subjected to it into a thing.” The definition is both precise and elusive. What is the nature and meaning of this implacable force in the premodern world? How is it measured and understood by those people upon whom it falls? What does it mean to become a thing?  Weil’s description has the virtue of turning interpretation away from the traditional preoccupation with heroism and free will, and toward questions about violence and representation, suffering and the power of human culture and institutions to intervene in its effects. How does the representation of force change in different literary and historical contexts? Does the institution of the law, whether human or divine, moderate and limit the power of force to turn people into things? Or is the Law itself merely another expression of force?

In this course, we will examine the nature of force and its relationship to the law in premodern literature from the Iliad through Greek tragedy, and from the Old to the New Testament in the Bible. We will be especially interested in how literary forms (epic poetry, tragedy, philosophical dialogue) imagine and respond in myriad ways to the force of subjection. Along the way we will consider how these premodern texts enable us to reflect critically upon our own contemporary moment in often surprising ways.

Sacred Texts: The Bible and the Koran in Literature and Film

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12739 0830-0950 MW CHA 303
CRN 12746 1000-1120 MW CHA 303

Professor: Susanna Lim

This course focuses on two texts that have not only been central to the development of ancient civilization, but whose influences are felt well into our modern age: the Bible and the Koran. Taking these two works as starting points, we will explore how the ideas, characters, images, and narrative elements of these holy texts have shaped literary and cultural texts from the medieval period to our modern age.

 Our reading list will include passages from the Old and New Testaments (Genesis, Job, the Gospels), "Inferno" from Dante's Divine Comedy, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Evgeny Zamyatin’s We, passages from the Koran, selections from One Thousand and One Nights, Salman Rushdie’s  Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and Arabian Nights and Days by Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz. We will also be considering films in relation to the literary topics in discussion.

This course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentations. Its goals are to help first and second year students develop critical reading and interpretation skills, as well as to polish academic writing skills and engage with the opinions of literary scholars. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two papers (4-5 pages), one small group presentation, and active participation in class.

Listening to Wisdom

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12747 1200-1320 MW CHA 307

Professor: Louise Bishop

What counts as knowledge in pre-modern societies? What makes knowledge last?  What, if anything, differentiates knowledge (scientia) from wisdom (sapientia)?

Stories – narratives -- carry knowledge in its many forms in both pre-modern and modern societies.  In his book The Literary Mind (Oxford UP, 1996), Mark Turner suggests that narrative—story--is the foundation of language itself.  Yet in the western Renaissance or early modern era, story becomes devalued as "mere story"—so Francis Bacon called it in 1626. Modernity makes history into story's opposite: history gives us fact rather than fiction, story gives us imagination rather than reality. Aren't facts more important than fiction?

Reading pre-modern texts attentively and carefully can help us understand the value of narrative and our own positions within a sea of story, from movies to YouTube. We'll use many kinds of tales (a tale is also a "mere story," according to the OED) and their "translations" (meaning "to carry, to transfer") to grapple with representations of self and other, and with the value -- and devaluation -- of imagination and emotion. We'll let the root of education -- educare, to lead forth -- lead us to new intellectual and emotional understandings as we consider the ways pre-modern cultures produced and saved these tales.  We’ll also investigate how and why we’ve gotten our hands on them in 2014 Oregon.  Your literary journey starts here.

Possible choices for texts include The Epic of Gilgamesh, Prometheus Bound, The Book of Job, Consolation of Philosophy, The Mahabharata/Bhagavad-Gita, The Vita Nuova, Hamlet.
Close reading is vital; interpretive muscle grows from it. Written work for the class will include ungraded response papers, two 1500-word formal papers, class presentations, and a comprehensive final examination. Some special events related to the class, such as films or readings, will be arranged during the term.

The Suppressed Voice Gets a Voice

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12748 1000-1120 TR CHA 303

Professor: Henry Alley

We will study the ancient period through to the end of the Renaissance, beginning with around 700 B.C. and ending about 1670--about 2000 years.  We will pass through Greek, Roman, medieval, and early modern literature, the texts being Homer's The Odyssey, Sophocles' Antigone, Virgil's The Aeneid, Hildegard's "The Order of the Virtues," Dante's Divine Comedy, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Milton’s Paradise Lost. Through these, we will study changing models of heroes, such as Odysseus, Penelope, Oedipus, Antigone, Aeneas, Hildegard's Soul, Dante the Wanderer, Hamlet, and Milton’s Adam and Eve. We will give attention to reading the poetic or prose texts closely, to the formal properties of epic and tragedy, to some of the larger controversies raised by these great works, as well as to the continuing conflict between political and private commitments -- as dramatized by the large-scale poems and dramas. We will examine how each writer was influenced by his or her predecessors and also look some great debates that have surrounded the texts over time--for example, if The Aeneid's hero ends with actions consistent with the poem's message.  We will also consult some current literary criticism, particularly with regard to the theme of male/female roles, and the way the traditionally suppressed voice of marginalized people becomes recognized.

The major emphasis of the class will be on discussion. There will be three short papers and a journal (a chance to explore your responses to the literature in a more informal context), in addition to several non-graded quizzes.

Gender Matters

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12749 1200-1320 WF 303 CHA

Professor: Katherine Brundan

This course presents us with literary texts in which gender plays a significant role in their plots and exchanges. We will read influential texts from the classical period to the eighteenth century featuring feisty heroines, transgressive gender roles, and a utopia inhabited by hermaphrodites. Language plays a key role in the representation of gender in these texts, so we will pay special attention to linguistic matters from rhetoric to riddles, insults to inscription, speech to silence. Some of our texts are rewritings or modern versions of older texts, illuminating how earlier works are interpreted and reworked by subsequent generations, transforming literary genres and philosophical debates. Texts include Sophocles’ Antigone and Oedipus Rex, Sappho’s poems, The Letters of Abelard and Heloise, Chaucer, “The Wife of Bath’s Tale,” Gabriel de Foigny’s utopian work, The Southern Land, Known, and Choderlos de Laclos’ novel, Dangerous Liaisons. This course introduces some literary theory and psychoanalytical writing. Assignments include close-reading responses most weeks to practice this fundamental literary skill.  There will be one formal essay, with plenty of scope to develop individual interests.

Poetry, Myth, and Transformation

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16858 1400-1520 TR FEN 119

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

“My intention is to tell of bodies/Changed to different forms," declares Roman poet Ovid in the opening to his epic work, The Metamorphoses.  Why tell stories of transformation? What different literary, cultural, and philosophical ideas shape our notions of form and change? With Ovid as our inspiration, we will examine mutations of voice, gender, and form in poetry, prose, and drama. We will pay close attention to the connections between speech, silence, and power; and to the literary transformation of ancient stories into modern ones.  

Requirements include formal and informal writing assignments, quizzes, and active contribution to class discussion.  Students should be prepared to read and write attentively and rigorously, to work collaboratively on oral and written projects, and to complete graded and ungraded assignments on a weekly basis. In addition to Ovid's Metamorphoses, texts will likely include Kafka, “The Metamorphosis,” Bauby's The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, and a selection of other works by nineteenth- and twentieth-century poets such as Algernon Charles Swinburne, Rita Dove, and John Hollander.

Crossing the Pamir Mountains: Eurasian History from the Persian to Mongol Empires

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12753 1600-1720 MW CHA 203
CRN 12754 1400-1520 MW GSH 103

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

Variously known as the roof of the world and the crossroads of history, the Pamir Mountains rising to 23,000 feet with passes at 17, 000 feet are awesome terrain at the heart of Eurasian history.  Motivated by desire, adventure, and profit, nomads, scholars, and merchants among others negotiated routes to Mediterranean, Himalayan, and Yellow River commercial networks.  The consequent rich exchange of ideas and material culture produced pre-conditions essential for emergent global modernity. In this course we will consider travel accounts, art history, and scientific discourse to explore the Eurasian continent from Greek city-states and Buddhist kingdoms to the medieval era of Christian rulers and Sufi masters.  We will find our way along silk road routes linking Changan and Samarkand to Baghdad and Rome. Our goal is to think historically and comparatively about complex social and intellectual developments.

Architecture and Urbanism of the Ancient and Medieval World

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12756 1000-1120 WF 203 CHA

Professor: Ocean Howell

This course will examine society and culture in the ancient and medieval world through the study of architecture and urbanism. In order to account for changes to the ordering of physical space, one must account for changes to the ordering of the broader society. Accordingly, in this course we will be using buildings and cities as a lens through which to investigate transformations in political systems (like the collapse of an empire), in economic systems (like the rise of mercantile capitalism), and in social systems (like the emergence of the bourgeoisie). The course will focus on Europe and the Mediterranean Basin, but will also consider the architectural expressions of emerging colonialism. Students will engage with primary sources like architectural drawings, travel narratives, city plans, and design treatises, among other materials. The overarching aim of this course is to teach students to think of history not as a set of static facts, but rather as a practice.


Beyond Boundaries: History in the Distant Past

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12757 1400-1520 TR CHA 203
CRN 12759 1600-1720 TR CHA 307

Professor: Michael Peixoto

Modern students are introduced to the discipline of history from a young age, not only in elementary and secondary school textbooks, but also through a multitude of media including movies, museums, monuments, novels, and video games.  Most of these sources draw from our imaginative concepts of history rather than approaching the past critically. Thus our collective imagination of the past (the deep past in particular) can create barriers between periods, geographical areas, sources, and peoples.  The goal in this course is to build a more detailed understanding of pre-modern history that privileges ideas of continuity over radical change, opening up the potential for students to appreciate and relate to communities of people who lived long before our own day.

The course will provide an overview of some of the essential themes of the rich historical periods before the year 1450 CE while challenging many of the common assumptions caused by the creation of artificial historical boundaries.  The readings and assignments will center on these moments of division, whether they be the break between chronological periods, Western and Eastern culture, nature and civilization, doctrine and practice of religion, or text and context of historical sources.  In all cases, we will attempt to look beyond the master narrative to reach a vivid understanding of the lives, cultures, beliefs, and experiences of people in the distant past.

The class will begin with an examination of pre-historic culture.  Among other topics, we will study ancient cultures in Greece, Rome, and the Near East, the creation of Germanic kingdoms in Europe, the expansive trade networks of the Abbasid Empire, law, renaissance, reformation, and gender in medieval European society, and the crusades.  In addition to the common readings, each student will have the opportunity to become more closely acquainted with a single text from the pre-modern period that will form a basis for both oral presentations and the final paper.

Science, Technology, and Environment in the Pre-Columbian Americas

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12750 1000-1120 MW CHA 307

Professor: Mark Carey

This course examines how ideas about nature and practices of environmental management shaped pre-modern societies from ancient times to roughly 1450.  Scientific knowledge and innovations—such as Mayan architecture, Inca cosmology, and Aztec botany—were fundamental for the development of ancient societies. Science and environmental knowledge often facilitated political power and imperial expansion, led to cultural change and urbanization, and influenced agricultural and technological innovations.  But the contributions of these pre-Columbian societies (up to the European conquest) have largely been ignored in world histories.  This course seeks to include these neglected groups in a broader history of pre-modern civilizations.  The course is thus globally oriented but focuses on non-western societies, especially those in the Americas and particularly the Mayas, Incas, and Aztecs.

Students will finish this course with skills that can be transferred beyond history courses, including the ability to: critically read and analyze documents and texts; write analytical essays; discuss ideas and concepts with peers; and identify and employ specific evidence to support one's assertions, both written and oral.  To refine writing skills, students will write several short papers (1-2 pages) and two longer papers (5-6 pages).  Oral communication skills will be polished through extensive classroom discussion and a group presentation, which will involve a formal presentation to the class.

From Memory to Written Record

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12751 1000-1120 MW 103 GSH
CRN 12758 0830-0950 MW 103 GSH

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

Histories of society and culture may be traced through articulate forms including works of literature, art, and philosophy. They may also be studied through the technical mechanisms that make such pursuits possible including speech and writing. In this course, we will take a long view of premodernity, principally in Europe and the Mediterranean region, while attending especially to intellectual practices including memory arts, writing and reading, measurement, calculation, and so forth. This course is intensive in reading, writing, and discussion. Students should be prepared to engage in unfamiliar subjects.


Human Encounters and the Origins of Historical Knowledge

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12752 1200-1320 TR GSH 131
CRN 12755 1600-1720 TR GSH 103

Professor: Tim Williams

This course explores the ancient and medieval world.  In particular, we will focus on fundamental questions of historical thinking that remain relevant today: Why remember the past? For whom is the past important? How does the study of the past explain the reality of the human condition? And what tools have groups used to disseminate that knowledge? To answer these core questions about the nature of history we will explore historical thinking across various cultures, places, and periods in the pre-modern world. On the one hand, we will focus on the traditional canon of historical thought in "western civilization," including historical works produced by the ancient Greek, Roman, and Hebrew people. On the other hand, we will also explore groups such as Slavic peoples of Eastern Europe and indigenous peoples of North America, who are typically neglected in the study of "western civilization."

We will read a wide range of primary sources from each of these traditions--including epic poetry, biblical texts, oral accounts, biographical works, and early confessional writing--as well as scholarly literature. These sources will not only draw us deeply into the cultural and intellectual history of the pre-modern world but they will also provide the raw material for understanding why individuals in the past pursued historical knowledge. We will explore these themes in regular class discussions and frequent writing assignments. By the end of the course, all students should feel grounded in the history of the pre-modern world, be able to discuss comfortably the complexity of historical knowledge and its varied uses, and demonstrate proficiency in written analysis of assigned texts.

Honors Forensics

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 399H 1.00-5.00 Credits

CRN 12760 1600-1720 TR CHA 303

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

The Clark Honors College hosts the nationally ranked University of Oregon Forensics Program. HC399 Forensics teaches students to excel as researchers and advocates through instruction and participation in intercollegiate debate, mock trials, and individual events competitions.

The program travels to about thirteen tournaments, hosts two large on-campus tournaments, and engages in various on-campus speaking activities. Debate students will be paired with partners and will be expected to conduct extensive research on the debate topics selected by the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and/or the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA).

Students interested in mock trial (AMTA) are joined with others to create 10-person teams for competition. Oregon Forensics prepares students to find their voice, which means not only helping students reach reasoned opinions and conclusions about important events but also developing the suite of skills they require to be ethical and effective advocates for their perspectives. Novice and experienced students are welcome: Absolutely no prior experience is required. Oregon Forensics produces scholars, leaders, and champions. Please visit the program website for more information.

This course is open to ALL UO students (not only Clark Honors College students) to enroll.

Thesis Orientation

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 408H 1.00 Credits

CRN 12765 1100-1550 Saturday, October 17 only CHA 303
CRN 12766 1700-2150 Thursday, October 15 only CHA 307

Professor: TBA

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.  Food and beverages will be provided.

Song and the Music of Poetry

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 421H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16871 1400-1520 MW VOL 101

Professor: Stephen Rodgers

Scholars who have written about the relationship between words and music have focused mainly on how music expresses the semantic content of words, leaving aside crucial questions about how music relates to the sound of words. In this class we will explore this understudied aspect of song, and ponder how composers respond to the speech sounds, or phonemes, of poetry when they set words to music. What prompts composers to highlight or exaggerate the sonic elements of a poem? How does the meaning of a poem relate to its materiality—its patterns of consonants and vowels, its rhythm and meter, its intonational shape, its “music”? And how is the music of poetry transformed when it comes into contact with the music of song? We will read some of the most lucid work on the sound patterns of poetry and apply this work to the analysis of songs by composers from the Baroque era to the end of the twentieth century. The main goal of the course is to offer a broadly interdisciplinary perspective on the diverse ways that these two sound worlds (poetry and music) interact.

Tolstoy's "War and Peace"

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 421H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16872 1800-1950 R Salem (plus travel time)

Professor: Steve Shankman

This course is open only to CHC students, and requires an application, interview, and instructor approval to register for this course.  If you are not familiar with the Inside-Out Program, please check out the information on the Honors College website here:  http://honors.uoregon.edu/story/inside-out-prison-exchange-program and watch the Inside-Out documentary here: http://vimeo.com/5193052.

An Information Session will be held on Monday, May 4th, 4-5 p.m., in 303 Chapman Hall. The Application is available on Clark Honors College Blackboard, under "Forms.”  Interviews will be held during Week 7, and students will be notified of their standing by end of Week 8. 

This class will be held on Thursdays, 6:00-8:50 p.m., inside the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem; transportation will be provided.  We'll leave campus sharply at 3:45 p.m. and return by 10:30 p.m. The first day of class will be held on Monday, September 28th, 4-6:50 p.m., in 303 Chapman Hall.

This is the first-ever two-quarter Inside-Out class ever taught at the University of Oregon. All students – both inside and out -- who sign up for the fall quarter colloquium will be expected to take the winter quarter colloquium as well. You will not be granted permission to enroll in the fall quarter class unless you commit yourselves to take the winter-quarter colloquium as well.

In our time of seemingly endless wars, we will read one of the world's greatest war novels, Tolstoy's massive War and Peace. We will read War and Peace in light of the thought of two of the 20th-Century’s greatest philosophers, Franz Rosenzweig (1886-1929) and Emmanuel Levinas (1905-1995). Tolstoy, who was himself a soldier and a nobleman, ended his life as a pacifist and a radical egalitarian. War and Peace is a meditation, based on Tolstoy's own personal experience, on the Napoleonic wars, including Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812, and on war in general.

Alongside War and Peace, during fall quarter we will read Rosenzweig's Understanding the Sick and the Healthy, which the philosopher wrote as a guide to his great but very difficult book The Star of Redemption. Rosenzweig composed The Star from the trenches in which he fought in the first World War (the so-called "Great War").  We will also read Levinas's essay "The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig" (In the Time of the Nations, pp. 150-160), which is the preface to an important book on Rosenzweig by Stéphane Mosès.

Rosenzweig's Star of Redemption views World War I as a kind of culmination of the history of Western philosophy that finds its expression in Hegel's book The Phenomenology of Spirit/Mind. The thought of Levinas, which was deeply influenced by Rozenzweig, is a response to the horrors of World War II. Levinas's reading of Russian literature as a young man, including his reading of Tolstoy, had a profound impact on the development of his philosophical thought. During winter quarter, we will focus on Levinas's book Totality and Infinity, and particularly on Levinas's distinction between ethics and politics. Levinas is here drawing on the thought of Rosenzweig, who is acutely aware, as is Tolstoy, of the difference between the political and the ethical self, of the difference, that is, between the human being viewed as playing a role in the unfolding of an impersonal world historical drama or narrative, on the one hand, and the human being seen as absolutely unique and irreplaceable, on the other. If ethics is peace, is war perhaps the inevitable result of pursuing politics at the expense of ethics?

The topic of this two-quarter colloquium is central to the concerns of the UNESCO Chair in Transcultural Studies, Interreligious Dialogue, and Peace at the University of Oregon.

Preventing Genocide and Mass Atrocities in the 21st Century

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 424H/421H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16964 1400-1520 TR CHA 303

Professor: David Frank

Graduation RequirementThis class will fulfill an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

This course is dedicated to the tragedies of mass atrocity and genocide.   We will consider approaches designed to inoculate against mass atrocities and genocide and the strategies available to confront mass atrocity or genocide breakout.  We will draw from the disciplines of rhetoric, social psychology, and decision-making. The genocide in Rwanda and the ongoing mass atrocities in Syria and the genocide in Darfur will be featured.  Students will gain a command of the scholarly literature in these three fields, engage in structured decision making simulations designed confront the tradeoffs faced by decision makers, and write a significant term paper on the decision making taking place when government officials are faced with contexts of mass atrocity and genocide, which they will use to update and repair Wikipedia sites on mass atrocity and genocide. The course will be divided into three interrelated sections: I) Theories explaining, inoculating against and successful interventions in mass atrocity and genocide.  II) Simulations of government decision-making in contexts of mass atrocity and genocide.  III) Presentations of student works of scholarship and rectification of Wikipedia sites on mass atrocity and genocide.

Human Rights, Peace and Conflict in the 21st Century

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 424H/431H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16874 1400-1650 T CON 106

Professor: Cheyney C. Ryan

Graduation Requirement:  This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

We will explore the history and practice of human rights today and their role in today's political struggles for a better world. Our focus will be both theoretical and practical. We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of human rights, as they emerged from the 20th Century experience of war; and we will look at specific conflicts where they now play a role, focusing initially on conflicts around war, genocide, and economic justice.

Professor Ryan is a senior fellow at Oxford University, Department of Politics and International Relations, teaching winter quarter in the Clark Honors College.

Global and Local Food

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 431H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12771 1200-1320 TR CHA 303

Professor: Daniel Buck

Food. Its production, provision and consumption form the existential core of every society. Many argue that our modern food systems have become so complex, global, and industrialized that they are no longer sustainable, that the modern world stands at a crossroads. What are these food systems? How did they form? How do they work? How do they change? Can they be changed? In this course we will learn conceptual and historical frameworks that lead to a critical understanding of the global, US, and Willamette Valley food systems. Fieldtrips to local farms and processors will help illuminate global/local entanglements, as well as the matrices of opportunities and constraints within which Willamette Valley producers operate (fieldtrips recommended but not required). There are no prerequisites for this class. The course aims to develop critical thinking skills about socio-economic processes through readings, discussions and lectures; students will apply concepts and knowledge to research, analyze and interpret a recent and significant trend or phenomenon, and communicate your findings through oral presentation and a written paper.

Economics in the Pacific Northwest

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 431H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16873 0800-0920 TR CHA 303

Professor: William Whitelaw

To explore the economics of the Pacific Northwest (PNW), we will ask: What trade-offs would the PNW face if it chooses to export coal from its ports? What is peculiar about the plight college graduates face in the PNW? How might wellness, innovation, clean streams and K-12 education together increase PNW economic prosperity? What are the analytical and rhetorical challenges of discussing spotted owls, sage grouse, and endangered species as PNW economic matters? What is the relationship between the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System and help-wanted ads in Seattle?

To earn the coveted Cub Economist Cap, we’ll wield Occam’s Razor to slash our path to the salient concepts underlying the PNW economy. What do salmon in the tributaries of the Columbia River have in common with the grounding of the New Carissa freighter on the south Oregon coast? In what sense is an increase of exports of lumber from a sawmill in Springfield, Oregon, not a measure of economic growth? How might building a 4-year university in Bend, Oregon, prove a bad economic decision?

And to earn the equally coveted Cub Policy Analyst Cap, we’ll learn, for each PNW issue, to describe rigorously where the PNW is economically, where it would like to be, and how best it can get from where it is to where it would like to be.

Arts & Letters Colloquium with International Culture

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 434H/421H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12773 1200-1320 MW 103 GSH

Professor: Helen Southworth

Course description forthcoming.

In the Case of Barack Obama v. Benjamin Netanyahu: The Israeli-Palestinian Civil War, The United States and Iran

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 434H/421H 4.00 Credits

CRN 17210 1400-1520 MW CHA 303

Professor: David Frank

Graduation Requirement:  This class will fulfill an Arts & Letters  Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

President Barack Obama’s June 4, 2009 “A New Beginning” speech, addressed primarily to the Arab and Muslim worlds, prompted a response from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on June 14, 2009 that was critical of Obama’s rendition of Israeli history.   The two speeches mark the origins of an ongoing rhetorical duel between the two men.  We will study the trajectories of this duel, doing so by placing it in its historical and rhetorical context.   Students will learn the general history of the Israeli-Palestinian civil war featuring the rhetorical duel between Obama and Netanyahu, engage in a simulation of the Israeli-Palestinian peace process in which each student will portray a key character in the drama, and write a research paper on their character. 

The City

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 434H/431H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12772 1200-1350 MW ANS 192

Professor: John Nicols

Graduation Requirement:  This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Cities have traditionally been the catalyst to political, cultural, scientific and economic development.  In this course, we look at the experiences of three cities. Ancient Athens set the standard in the Western Tradition for high cultural achievement, and defined the ‘classical’. Renaissance Florence is the second city in this exploration, and one that built on classical roots to form a new sense of cultural achievement. In these two cases I work with the students to understand why Athens and Florence have come to occupy the very special place that they have in the Western Tradition and to explain, in part, why the arts (not just architecture, but philosophy, history, etc.) flourished in these cities especially.
 
The third city to be discussed in the course is Weimar, Berlin. And here one may well ask why? I argue that much of what passes as high culture in the 20th century (theater, cinema, philosophy, science, music, painting, architecture) truly enjoyed a ‘golden age’ in the 1920s Berlin, but it was an achievement that provided no protection from the deluge unleashed by the Nazis. The resulting Diaspora of scholars and artists has had however a profound effect on western and on American culture.

Through it all I ask the students to reflect on - what makes for a successful urban experience? What can society do to promote excellence in the arts? And, to consider why high cultural achievement failed to provide a defense against totalitarianism. 

A link to the course plan and the syllabus may be found at: http://klio.uoregon.edu/city/

NOTE:  Students who take the course may also receive credit toward the history and/or humanities major.  The course has a natural link to HIST/HUM/PHYS 361 [Modern Science and Culture].

Relativity, the Quantum and Reality

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 441H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12774 0900-0950 MWF CHA 307

Professor: Michael Kellman

We will explore the profound conceptual challenges in thinking about nature brought about by two of the great revolutions in science of the twentieth century: special relativity and quantum mechanics. We will first explore each of these theories at a deep but simple level, using elementary examples. We will then explore the extremely strange things that happen when we try to put these theories together.

We will begin with a brief treatment of the ancient theories of motion of Aristotle that persisted through the Middle Ages, then the revolutionary notions of Copernicus and Galileo about planetary motion and the principle of inertia.  We will then proceed to readings from Newton on absolute space and time, itself a revolutionary idea when propounded in the seventeenth century at the dawn of modern science. Next, we will explore the change in thinking about space and time brought about by the theory of relativity, especially Einstein's revolutionary understanding of 1905. We will perform an intense reading of Einstein's famous popular text on relativity, still one of the clearest expositions, and a fascinating insight into the mind of this great thinker. Then we will explore the revolutionary changes brought about in the early twentieth century with the advent of quantum mechanics, the theory of the microscopic world. We will again pursue the most basic understanding, probing the famous wave particle duality with the two-slit experiment, following the renowned treatment of Feynman.

After dealing with the perplexing situation of the notorious "Schrodinger's cat" the course will culminate with an exploration of the mind-boggling things that happen when we try to put relativity and quantum theory together. The predictions of each theory, separately and together, have been verified in all experiments with astonishing accuracy. However, with the joining of relativity and quantum mechanics, profound and bizarre problems arise – conceptually things just don't make complete sense! We will see that perhaps the deepest problem is what Einstein called the "spooky action at a distance" in "entangled" quantum systems that come about when we include relativity. Quantum magic results, challenging our deepest ideas of "reality."

This course is intended as a serious exploration of some of the most fascinating ideas that have come out of the modem scientific revolutions that took place first in the seventeenth century with the advent of Newton's physics, and then in the twentieth century with the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. There will be an emphasis on original texts of leading thinkers; written composition; and serious mathematical treatment that is up to the task, but at an elementary precalculus level accessible to intelligent students of various backgrounds. The needed mathematics will be introduced in a tutorial fashion, either as review or new material depending on personal background.

The course is not intended to be primarily for students majoring in science - Honors College students majoring in fields other than natural science may well be the greatest beneficiaries.

Assessing Climate Change Magnitude Through Data

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 441H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12775 1600-1750 TR LIB 41

Professor: Gregory Bothun

Climate change may be the defining environmental challenge facing our planet, yet there is considerable uncertainty regarding the overall social impact due to the limited capabilities of existing physics-based models of the Earth system. Most lay people do not appreciate our limited understanding of the physical nature of the climate system, how its components interact, and the subsequent uncertainties in overall climate change impacts. Therefore important questions relating to food security, water resources, biodiversity, and other socio-economic issues remain unresolved. Data driven approaches that have been highly successful in other scientific disciplines hold significant potential for application in climate change impacts.

This course then serves as an example of applying these discipline based data techniques to the overall nature of climate change. A particular goal is to introduce the students to the volatile nature of climate to begin with, and then to use the data to assess if that volatility is increasing (it is, by the way, and this is demonstrable now with data). The overall goal is to better inform the student of the complex nature of the Earth system and the mechanisms contributing to the potential adverse consequences of climate change as well as identifying, from the data, whether or not any of these adverse consequences is now emerging.

Geometry from a Cultural/Historical Perspective

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 441H 4.00 Credits

CRN 16882 1400-1520 MW ANS 193

Professor: Shlomo Libeskind

This seminar will explore the development of geometry through the ages—from its practical origins in ancient Egypt through its deductive perfection in ancient Greece. We will look at the Indian and Chinese contributions to geometry, its cultivation in Islam and its history in Europe and the Americas. We will discuss how the various cultures used geometry in everyday life and in art, literature and science.
 
In ancient Greece, around 400 BCE, rigorous study of geometry was undertaken both for its intrinsic beauty and for intellectual satisfaction.  The deductive approach that the Greeks introduced was collected and summarized by Euclid in his masterpiece The Elements.

We will explore the influence of The Elements on the development of mathematics and science, and its convoluted history from its Greek origins, to its translation to Arabic (before the original Greek was lost) and finally to Latin in the 12th century CE. This will be an opportunity to examine the contribution of the Moslems to mathematics and their use of geometry in art.

The seminar will be accessible to any honors college student with a basic knowledge of high school pre-­‐calculus mathematics. Our focus will be mathematical but will not assume previous experience with proof-­‐oriented geometry. We will discuss strategies for approaching proofs and solving problems and guide students toward successfully solving unfamiliar problems on their own. We will explore the following:

• How does one know how to begin a proof or a solution and how to proceed?
• Which approach is more promising and why?
• Are different solutions possible,  and how do they compare?

We will emphasize that proofs and solutions to problems don’t come “out of the blue” and will discuss the thinking process leading to a proof or solution.

Topics will include plane and 3-­‐dimensional geometry, spherical geometry and the development of non-­‐ Euclidean geometry in the 19th century. We will use geometry software that will make our work more accessible by first introducing concepts experimentally.

Decolonizing Research: The Northern Paiute History Project

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 444H/431H 4.00 Credits

CRN 12776 1400-1520 TR LIB 201

Professor: Kevin Hatfield

Professor: Jennifer O'Neal

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class.

Field Research Trip:

The transformative centerpiece of the course is a two-day mandatory field research trip (tentatively scheduled  for October 16-17, 2015) to the Warm Springs Reservation and cultural sites in Central Oregon. This experience fosters relationships that endure throughout, and beyond, the class through partner class visits on campus, conference calls, written correspondence, and oral histories. The trip also encourages students to think critically about the way they have traditionally learned history by physically and intellectually immersing them in the culture and history they are studying and placing them in dialogue with tribal community course partners. The group discussions between students and tribal members also generate new questions such as how to incorporate the multiple viewpoints and truths presented from tribal members, and how to negotiate differences and contradictions among documentary primary sources, oral history testimony, and living memory.

Course Legacy:

Students’ work will enjoy a course afterlife, and students will have the opportunity to share their work with the tribal, campus, and academic community through participation in campus, regional, and national conferences.  Past students have presented at the American Historical Association Annual Meeting, the Western Social Science Association Conference, the Alternative Sovereignties Conference, the Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change Conference, and the UO Undergraduate Symposium. In addition, selected papers will be compiled in a course monograph that is published in the UO Libraries Scholars Bank.

For more information, including course materials, course partner biographies, and field research trip photographs are highly encouraged to visit the Northern Paiute History Project website: http://blogs.uoregon.edu/hc444f13hatfield/

Over the past three years the “Northern Paiute History Project” has evolved into a formal collaboration between co-instructors Kevin Hatfield and Jennifer O’Neal and the Northern Paiute communities of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and the Burns Paiute Tribe.  The course instructors have partnered with tribal elders, spiritual leaders, language instructors, Museum and Culture and Heritage Department staff, and many other tribal community members and visiting scholars to develop a set of shared research protocols and ethics for this course.  The course positions students to perform original research and create new knowledge in direct and continuous collaboration and mentorship with tribal community partners, and ultimately contribute scholarship to a largely neglected and traditionally distorted field of history.

The course engages undergraduates in a unique opportunity to apply original research to on-going community-based “restoration” history projects with the Northern Paiute tribal communities, including: the collection and digital return of Northern Paiute archival sources; the creation of a formal Northern Paiute Oral History Collection co-located at the University of Oregon Special Collection and University Archives, Museum at Warm Springs, and the Warms Springs Culture and Heritage Department; the co-authoring of an annotated bibliography of Northern Paiute resources; the annual printing of the student papers monograph for “sharing back” with the tribal communities; and the incorporation of Northern Paiute voice, knowledge, and perspective into the narrative of museum exhibits, historical signage, and other popular culture expressions in the Northern Great Basin region.

Honors College Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 477H 2.00 Credits

CRN 12777 1000-1150 F CHA 303
CRN 12779 1000-1150 R PETR 101

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.

Honors College Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 477H 2.00 Credits

CRN 12780 0800-0950 W ANS 192
CRN 12781 1600-1750 M CHA 303

Professor: Helen Southworth

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.

Honors College Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2015-2016
HC 477H 2.00 Credits

CRN 12778 1700-1850 W CHA 303

Professor: Terry Hunt

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.