Winter 2015 Course Descriptions

Paleontology of Oregon

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 209H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22617 1400-1520 TR CHA 307

Professor: Samantha Hopkins

Native Oregonians know that this state is fortunate enough to have an incredible fossil record, and one that has been historically very important. We will use the study of the history of life as recorded in Oregon’s fossil record to understand scientific thinking and the process of science. Our study will range from the formation of the actual land of Oregon via plate tectonics, to the importance of the fossil record of Oregon to our understanding of the interaction between organisms and their environments, to the role of humans in the extinction of mammoths and saber-toothed cats, to the evolutionary origins of marine vertebrates such as sharks, whales, ichthyosaurs, and dolphins. Students will learn the basics of geology, evolutionary biology, and paleontology through the lens of the fossil record in our own backyard.

The class will consist of three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Grading will be on the basis of two exams, a term project, out-of-class exercises, and class participation. Students will read both popular science/news articles and primary scientific literature, and learn to distinguish good science from pseudoscience. We will also take field trips to see fossils and rocks in their native context. This class has no prerequisites, and requires only curiosity, objectivity, and a willingness to discuss.

Invention of Love

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22618 1400-1520 TR GSH 103

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

It is so common to speak of love in books, films and magazines that it appears to be a shared, universal feeling. And yet, if we engage in a historiography of love, it is soon clear that love has had many faces, and that the love of which we speak in the 21st century is not the same as the 17th-century love, which in its turn, differs greatly from the 12th-century love. This course will look into many of the ways in which the idea of love has been construed. We will start with the biblical The Song of Songs, proceed to medieval Tristan and Iseult, and arrive at classical French Le Cid, by Corneille. We will also read several of Shakespeare’s sonnets, some lais and blasons by Italian and French poets (such as Petrarch and Marie de France, among others), a canto from Dante’s Inferno, as well as poems by Michelangelo and Spanish mystics San Juan de la Cruz and Santa Teresa de Avila. We will also look at modern readings and rewritings of some of these older texts and read poems by Yehuda Amichai and Juan Gelman. Some of the questions guiding us are: How is love culturally and historically specific? How did the concept of courtly love develop? How is the performance of love affected by the concept of honor in the 17th century? How are gender and desire portrayed? How do the secular and the sacred converge in love poetry? How is the mystical experience depicted in terms of sensual/sexual love? How can love poetry be used to speak of exile and the nation?

Tradition and Innovation

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22619 1000-1120 MW CHA 307
CRN 22620 0830-0950 MW CHA 307

Professor: Susanna Lim

In this course we will be reading important works of Western and Eastern European literature from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. While approaching the texts through close reading, we will also discuss the works in their historical, cultural, and national contexts. In particular, we will focus on the three literary and artistic movements of classicism, romanticism, and realism. In the first part of our course, we will be reading selections from Western European literature: Molière’s Tartuffe; Jonathan Swift’s A Modest Proposal; Voltaire’s Candide or Optimism; and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s Faust. In the second half we will shift our attention to Eastern Europe, to Russian literature, seeing it as a particularly interesting testing ground for the intellectual and artistic currents originating in the West. We will discuss works such as Alexander Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, the short stories of Nikolai Gogol, Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground, Leo Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilych, and Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard. We will also view film adaptations of certain texts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two critical papers and an oral presentation, as well as active participation in class.

Eco-Literature and Genius Loci: Literary Response to the Natural Environment

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22621 0830-0950 MW CHA 203

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Homer sang it, Aesop fabled it, Shakespeare sonneted it, Milton made it epic, Wordsworth gave us our words’ worth: since Gilgamesh scratched it on clay in cuneiform in 2700 BCE, eco-literature is a dynamic portrait of what it means to be human, marveling at the fanged, the fierce, the lofty, the flowing. How does the human mind conceive and express nature, and what is at stake in this consciousness—and conscience? What is at stake in how we represent earth and understand our relation to it? Our class takes up writing that turns our heads upwards, brings us to our knees, inspires us to climb and leap, make and break laws, save savannahs, wage war and peace, fight for civil rights, declare love, and try to preserve the earth. We take a gander at ancient and classic foundations of eco-literature as we consider how we present our world to our children, from Dr Seuss to E.B. White to Shel Silverstein.

We ponder icons of the ecology movement, including Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Wendell Berry, and poetry of Wordsworth, Gerard Manley Hopkins, William Cullen Bryant, Emily Dickinson, Joyce Kilmer, Pablo Neruda, and contemporaries such as Mary Oliver, Gary Snyder, W.S. Merwin, Alicia Ostriker, Story Musgrave, and others. We’ll note how leaders of countries (such as Charles, Prince of Wales, Wangari Maathai of Kenya) and organizations (such as Humane Society’s Wayne Pacelle, Patagonia’s Yvon Chouinard), and the Supreme Court (William O. Douglas) write about the environment. From works narrated by pigs and dogs and elephants, to Daniel Quinn’s Ishmael, Kenneth Bennett’s eco-thriller set in our Pacific Northwest, Exodus 2022, Walter M. Miller, Jr.’s Canticle for Liebowitz, to writers such as Barry Lopez, Annie Dillard, Terry Tempest Williams, Scott Sanders, Barbara Kingsolver, Edward Abbey, and John McPhee, to Orion, ILSE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, and CHC student-nominated favorites, students select examples of contemporary and modern eco-lit classics for an eco-literature review. We’ll preview a work in progress of a drama musical on trees, engage with local and regional eco-writers, create an original “poet-tree slam,” and your own eco-lit journal as well as "eco-crit." Class will include field trips on and off campus, including to our own Walden Pond.

The Mystery You’re Investigating May Be Your Own

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22622 1200-1320 MW ANS 193
CRN 22624 1400-1520 MW ANS 193

Professor: Casey Shoop

This course explores a range of literary and cinematic works in which protagonists, narrators, and even readers/viewers find themselves caught up in plots beyond their understanding. If one traditional convention of the detective genre entails a central character who solves the mystery through the sheer power of his/her reason to order the clues into a coherent account of ‘whodunit,’ the texts in this course offer no such clear resolution nor any agent capable of standing outside of the mystery and verifying its final meaning. On the contrary, these characters and protagonists inhabit uncertain worlds, negotiate abstract systems of power, and experience unstable relationships to both their own identities and the larger realities around them. This is not a course on the detective genre per se—we will consider texts from 1600 to the present—but we will be interested in how certain works may be said to produce the mystery of their own interpretation. How and why do particular literary works create self-conscious ambiguity about their meaning? What is the value of our own uncertainty in reading such texts? Does our act of reading/viewing reduplicate the experience of the protagonists at the center of these plots? Are we caught in the plot as well? If so, what is the meaning of our own capture in these elusive narratives? Possible literary authors include William Shakespeare, Rene Descartes, Joseph Conrad, Franz Kafka, Thomas Pynchon, Patricia Highsmith, Haruki Murakami, Colson Whitehead, among others. Possible directors include Alfred Hitchock, Michelangelo Antonioni, Agnes Varda, and David Lynch, among others.

Overwhelming Underdogs

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22626 1000-1120 TR CHA 203

Professor: Henry Alley

The texts are Goethe’s Faust: Part One, Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, Eliot’s Silas Marner, Lawrence’s Daughters of the Vicar, Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilych, Kurosawa’s Ikiru, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Kushner’s Angels in America, and King’s “I Have a Dream.” Following up "on the suppressed voice gets a voice,” my theme of previous HC 221 courses, we will study changing models of heroes, such as Faust, Elinor Dashwood, Silas Marner, Louisa Lindley, Alfred Durant, Clarissa Dalloway, Prior Walter, and Martin Luther King.
We will give attention to reading the poetic or prose texts closely, and to how the unconventional protagonist becomes a primary focus in these great works. In addition, we will look at the rise, as dramatized by the authors, of alternative communities which support the “overwhelming underdog” (phrase from Yogi Berra) and the new concepts of belonging and marriage which he or she may be seeking. The major emphasis of the class will be on discussion. There will be three short papers, several non-graded quizzes and a reading journal (a chance to explore your responses to the literature in a more informal context).

Order: Moral and Otherwise

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22627 1200-1320 TR CHA 307

Professor: Frances Cogan

This term we will be studying order – or the way people arrange their lives with their most important guiding principle at the center.  This central value dictates other life choices.

We will study various kinds of Order as they appear in a variety of works this term, many of which will be plays.  Works will include:

Mort D’Arthur – Arthurian legends)

Sonnets – English, French, Italian (in translation)

Twelfth Night – Shakespeare’s romantic comedy

Burlador de Sevilla – The first literary Don Juan (Spanish play)

Le Cid – A French version of the Spanish epic of the Cid

Le Misanthrope – Molière at his best

The Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee – Chinese detective novel

There will be 2 medium-length papers (4-6 pages) and 1 short paper (1/2 page to 1 page).  Topics will be handed out, but with the ability to suggest your own.  Paper average will make up 60% of the grade.  No midterm; take-home final.  Final will make up 40% of the grade.  Attendance required and taken each session.

“30 Days of Night”: A History (and Anatomy) of Terror and Fear

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 Credits

CRN 22625 1600-1720 MW CHA 307
CRN 27417 1200-1320 MW GER 246

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

“The sinister,” warns cult author Thomas Ligotti, “[and] the terrible never deceive:  the state in which they leave us is always one of enlightenment.”  “We may hide from horror,” Ligotti continues, but “only in the heart of horror.”

 Focused on narrative fiction (including poetry and drama) as well as visual media (some paintings and video games, but chiefly fiction film), this section of HC222H is an inquiry into terror and fear.  In this course, we will no doubt touch upon many things that frighten us individually, but our main concern will be how different cultures have, over time, related both to and through terror and fear, and we will explore that concern through an examination of how terror and fear “work” (physiologically, psychologically, culturally, and sociologically), as well as the positive and negative potentialities—and consequences—of terror and fear.  Over the term, we will work together to unpack terror and fear as they apply to narrative; we will examine and question the “universality” of terror and fear, and ask why (and how) terror and fear have figured—and continue to figure—so frequently in the narratives that we construct and consume.

Readings span the 17th century through the 21st century and range widely in terms of audience and appeal. Primary written texts include longer works by Christopher Marlowe (The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus), Mary Shelley (Frankenstein), Henry James (The Turn of the Screw), H.P. Lovecraft (At the Mountains of Madness), Richard Matheson (I Am Legend), William Gibson (Neuromancer), and Stephen King (Cell), as well as shorter pieces by Edgar Allan Poe (“The Pit and the Pendulum”; “The Conqueror Worm”), Sheridan Le Fanu (Carmilla), Ted Hughes (“Crow Blacker than Ever”), Thomas Ligotti (selections from The Nightmare Factory), Octavia Butler (“Bloodchild”), and Shirley Jackson (a small selection of her short stories).  Narrative films include Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby (1968), Derek Jarman’s Jubilee (1978), Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist (1982), David Cronenberg’s Videodrome (1983), James Cameron’s Aliens (1986), Claire Denis’s Trouble Every Day (2001), and Mike Flanagan’s Oculus (2013).  Secondary texts include short critical essays specifically selected to help contextualize the assigned readings and films, as well as brief selections from longer pieces (book-length works by Helen Hackett, Shelly Kagan and Carol Clover, for instance) more broadly germane to the theme and approach of the course.  Written work will mostly consist of short weekly assignments/journal entries as well as two essays, the first at 3-4 pages, and the second at 5-6 pages.

Ecopoetry

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 222H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22628 1600-1720 MW GSH 103

Professor: John Witte

Nature poetry in English has in recent years been revitalized by a widespread ecological awakening. Our class will investigate the links between poetry and environmentalism, and explore the various ways that nature has been represented in English and American verse. Our close reading of poems – from Chaucer to Hopkins to Mary Oliver – will be framed by ten seminal essays on ecopoetry. We will address the pressing issues of species extinction, environmental degradation, and climate change, finding in the dynamic equilibrium of wilderness clues for our own survival. We will acquire from this course a keen sense of the poem as an instrument for quickening ecological awareness.

#OldNewMedia: Print Culture in the Modern Atlantic World

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 232H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22631 1400-1520 TR PLC 248
CRN 22632 1600-1720 TR CHA 203

Professor: Tim Williams

We live in an era of social media. The advent of the internet in the late twentieth century dramatically changed how individuals receive and disseminate ideas. Yet while the technology is "new" (blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Kindle, for example), the purposes of using media for social connection and the exchange of information are not. A defining feature of the modern era, in fact, is the way in which literacy and print media shaped individuals' attitudes about self and society, as well as their interactions (for good or bad) within families, communities, peer groups, and social "others" in everyday life. As we today face the changes technology has wrought, it therefore becomes imperative to step back in time and contemplate past media revolutions and their influences on society and culture. Because this focus is conceptually vast and complicated, we will focus on the modern Atlantic World, particularly North America and the United States, from the Columbian era to the present day. The course will begin with a cross-disciplinary, theoretical discussion of media's role in defining modernity (especially print media). We will define what it means to produce and consume media individually and socially. We will then delve into more focused topics including (but not limited to) cross-culture interactions in the "New World"; print, politics, and nationalism; democratization, literacy, and education; social reform, slavery, and race; and popular entertainment, social inclusion, and exclusion. As we examine these topics, we will read primary sources such as essays, pamphlets, diaries, letters, autobiographies, as well as popular culture sources such as novels; we will also consider radio, television, and film. At the same time, we will read scholarly books and articles on each topic and write frequent analytical essays in response to what we read and discuss.

Long-Distance Trade and Exchange in the Making of the Modern World, Since 1450 CE

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 232H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22633 1000-1120 MW CHA 303
CRN 22635 0830-0950 MW CHA 303

Professor: Abigail Owen

This course considers the flow of materials, humans, ideas, and cultural expectations in an era of long-distance trade. We will read the story of the English East India Company, which extended itself through geography, imperialism, the spread of written culture, and expectations of governance. Similarly, the tale of Matteo Ricci, a Jesuit from Italy who became a fixture in the Chinese imperial court, asks us to consider two sides of expectations about culture and knowledge in a global society. We will also consider the economic and cultural contributions of Africans who were brought in bondage to the Americas, via their agricultural knowledge and labor. Students will be asked to reflect on historical records of trade, exchange, empire, expanding geographical horizons, and cultural change in the study of global history. Readings include: Ogborn, Miles. Indian Ink: Script and Print in the Making of the English East India Company. University of Chicago Press, 2008. Spence, Jonathan D. The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci. New York, N.Y: Penguin Books, 1985.

Architecture and Urbanism in the Modern World

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 232H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22634 1200-1320 MW GSH 103
CRN 22638 1000-1120 MW GSH 103

Professor: Ocean Howell

This course will examine society and culture of the modern world through the study of architecture and urbanism. In order to account for changes to the ordering of physical space, one must account for changes to the ordering of the broader society. Accordingly, we will be using buildings and cities as a lens through which to investigate transformations in political systems (like the emergence of democratic nation states), economic structures (like "globalization"), and social systems (like class and race relations). The course will focus on Europe and North America, but will also consider the architectural expressions of imperialism. Students will engage with primary sources like architectural drawings, reportage, travel narratives, city plans, and design treatises, among other materials.

Historical Thinking in a Global Framework, 1350-Present

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 232H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22637 1000-1120 TR CHA 307

Professor: Joseph Fracchia

In the beginning of that century near whose end Columbus crossed the Atlantic, the Chinese admiral Zheng made seven major voyages throughout the South Pacific and across the Indian Ocean to the thriving trade centers on Africa’s east coast. His fleet consisted of 62 ships, most of which were so large that Columbus’s entire fleet of three ships could easily fit on their decks. Compared to the great and extremely wealthy cities of China, the Indian Ocean rim, and the “Middle East,” what we call “Europe” was a rural and poor provincial backwater. Just a few centuries later, however, around 1800, the tiny kingdom of England had acquired an empire on which “the sun never set,” and by 1900 Europe had completed its conquest of the world. Yet within 50 years, European powers had destroyed themselves in two World Wars, revolutions by “third world” peoples were overthrowing colonial rule, and the nuclear-armed “superpowers,” the U.S. and the U.S.S.R, were locked in a hostile confrontation that not only affected all parts of the world, but also threatened its annihilation. By the first decade of the new millennium, the euphoria following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the ‘victory’ of the ‘West’ has quickly waned as a result of economic crisis; and China has regained a position of economic preeminence.

These astonishing transformations will be the topics of this course, which will consist of an introduction followed by four parts. In the Introduction we will take stock of the state of the world circa 1350. Through comparative socio-cultural analyses we will glimpse the similarities and differences in how people lived and thought in China, India, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas. In the second part of the course, we will focus specifically on the profound transformation of European society, politics, culture and international standing effected in Europe by the advent of capitalism. In Part III we will focus on the great upheavals that made the 20th century doubtless the most barbarous in human history: the two world wars, the Holocaust, the rise and fall of the Soviet Union and the anti-colonial revolutions. In the concluding part, we will take stock of our world burdened by economic crisis - full of social, national, ethnic and/or religious conflicts; and we will try to figure out where we go from here.

The class sessions will consist of discussions of assigned readings with occasional lecture-discussion. Written assignments are: two papers (5-6 pages) and final exam.

Mapping Modernities: Geography, Commerce, and Technology

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 232H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22630 1200-1320 TR ANS 193
CRN 22636 1400-1520 TR ANS 193

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

The end of the Mongol Empire (13th/14th centuries) inadvertently set in motion many of the preconditions of our modern world. How did this happen? What were these preconditions, and how did they develop historically in various political and cultural settings? How did East Asian definitions of the post-Mongol “modern” compare with Ottoman or English definitions? As societies sought to re-organize themselves in this new global setting, a kaleidoscope of social perceptions emerged around the themes of human purpose, the natural environment, and inter-state relations. From a global vantage point, multiple, competing modernities began to appear. How did this situation eventually produce the promises and crises of the 20th and 21st centuries? Through the study of geography, commerce, and technology, we will explore the ways in which different political and cultural centers experienced the governing and economic challenges of the modern era.

HC 232H History

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 232H 4.00 Credits

CRN 27414 1200-1320 TR ANS 195

Professor: Michael Peixoto

In 1550, when Giorgio Vasari wrote that his readers could “… be enabled more easily to recognize the progress of the re-birth of the arts, and the perfection to which they have attained in our own time,” he broke with a long standing pre-modern trend of disparaging the present in favor of an idealized past; couching innovation, progressive thought, and social change in a backward-looking, even at times, pessimistic language of return and reform.  Not at all alone in his perspective on historical consciousness, Vasari followed Francesco Petrarch (1304-1375), who wielded historical time, periodization, and modernity as tools for shaping and articulating current culture—techniques that many thinkers have continued to employ up through the present day. From the framing of new achievements and the creation of national identities to the organization of historical material in archives, monuments and museums, the desire to control, preserve and manipulate a narrative of the past has formed a defining element of what it means to be a modern person or modern society. This class explores the use of history to create concepts of modernity and frame one’s understanding of the present day within the relevance of the past.

The class will begin with the works of early modernist thinkers who first articulated a concept of renaissance, or historical rebirth, in the fifteenth and sixteenth century.  We will then turn to the works of Ottoman historians who sought to categorize their own achievements as a similar revitalization of Roman antiquity and explorers, who often framed their new understanding of global geography in medieval and biblical terms.  We will consider the organization of historical thought in the pre and post “Enlightenment” periods; exploring the creation of systems of documentary editing, archiving, and collecting in museums.  Finally, we will look at the role of historical discourse in the revolutionary writing of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  In particular, we will study the concept of time and the dichotomy of past and present in the French and Haitian revolutions, the creation of nationalism, and the Marxist ideas of class struggle and historical destiny.

Forensics

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 399H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22639 1800-1950 MW ALL 140

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

Clark Honors College hosts the nationally ranked University of Oregon Forensics Program. The program is designed to teach rhetorical habits of mind and speech through intercollegiate debate and individual events. The program travels to about thirteen tournaments, hosts two on-campus tournaments, and engages in some on-campus speaking activities. Two graduate teaching fellows are assigned to the program. Debate students will be paired with partners and will be expected to conduct extensive research on the debate topics selected by the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and the Parliamentary Debate Association. Novice and experienced student debaters are welcome.

This course is open to ALL UO students (not only Clark Honors College students) to enroll.

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 403H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22640

Professor: TBA
Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 404H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22641

Professor: TBA
Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 405H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22642

Professor: TBA
Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 406H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22643

Professor: TBA

Thesis Orientation Workshop

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22644 1100-1550 S 1/31 only CHA 303

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.

Food and beverages will be provided.

Thesis Orientation Workshop

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22645 1700-2150 R 1/22 only CHA 303

Professor: Mark Carey

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.

Food and beverages will be provided.

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 409H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22646

Professor: TBA

Negotiating in Northern Ireland

Winter term, 2014-2015
CRES 410 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 21668 1000-1150 MW KNI 282

Professor: Shaul Cohen

This course is open to CHC students Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill the following requirement: a Social Science Colloquium (431H). If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill an Elective ColloquiumOr, students may request this course to fulfill an IC Multicultural course requirement, if needed, by sending an email to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator at mjordan@uoregon.edu.

This course will use Northern Ireland as a primary case to focus on social conflict, territorial disputes, and options for moving toward political accommodations. It will operate in a mixed lecture/seminar format, and touch upon a range of issues that reflect the broad impact of zero sum conflicts, including sectarian dynamics in the work place, the family, the educational system, government, popular culture, and "the street." It will explore structural elements that are part of the Catholic-Protestant/Republican-Nationalist-Unionist-Loyalist struggle, as well as the narratives that stem from and contribute to the encompassing dispute. In lecture and discussion we will move among several different scales as we incorporate the experience of the individual, the community, and the nation(s) and attempt to identify strategies that help mitigate or transform the zero sum situation that has characterized much of Northern Ireland for generations.

Students are required to attend a special class session on Wednesday, March 11th, 1800-2350, in KNI 241.

Gift Exchange in Medieval Literature

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22647 1400-1650 W PLC 248

Professor: Stephanie Clark

This course will use scholarly analysis of gift-exchange from several disciplines (anthropology, philosophy, economics, medieval studies) to frame and illuminate exchange in a variety of early medieval texts. The course will be divided into two units. In the first, we will build on insights from Marcel Mauss's seminal essay The Gift to examine how reciprocity functions in works like Beowulf and Njal's saga, considering sub-topics such as the gift and social order and the gift and violence. In the second unit, we will read part of Jacques Derrida's deconstruction of Mauss in Given Time I: Counterfeit Money in order to consider more explicitly the function of the nonreciprocal free gift in both modern ideology and medieval social structures. This focus will allow us to study the way that both modern and medieval societies value the other-oriented nature of the gift above self-interested action while teasing out the different senses of the social embeddedness of the individual within particular texts. Thus, in this unit we will read several medieval saints' lives in which the gift features prominently as well as examining how the principles of gift-theory can be applied to a text that ostensibly has little to do with gift-giving, Andreas Capellanus's 12th century treatise On Love. Along the way, we will read several additional essays by medievalists examining how gift-exchange works in the primary texts under consideration. In the final week of class we'll bring the theory to bear on modern cultural expressions of gift-giving (such as Christmas) in order to give students an explicit opportunity to think through how the gift works in our own culture and in their own lives. While gift-giving was much more central to pre-modern societies than it is today, thinking about early practices of gift-giving can help us see ourselves more clearly and imagine alternative ways of organizing society and exchanging things. Students will write weekly short applications of each theoretical approach to a particular primary text as well as a term paper in which they present their own researched analysis of exchange in one of the primary texts.

The Aesthetics of Anxiety in the Modernist Moment

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22648 1200-1320 TR CHA 203

Professor: Jeffrey Librett

Focusing on German and Austrian literary, philosophical, musical, cinematic, and psychoanalytic texts, this course provides an introduction to the aesthetics of the modernist movement by way of what may have been its principal mood: anxiety (or as we say in English: Angst). By “modernist movement” I mean here roughly the period of the first half of the twentieth century, understood as a phase in the history of ideas and arts. The course suggests how creative work in this period largely rests on—and indeed, often consciously places itself upon—a foundation of radical uncertainty, both epistemic and ethical. This uncertainty includes an indeterminability of the border between the rational and the emotive, the scientific and the aesthetic, the sane and the insane—in short, the objective and the subjective. Thus, it is not just doubt as skeptical thought that we are talking about here, but rather an uncanny mood that always borders on panic. And yet in modernism, this mood receives a very positive inflection in various instances. In finding and/or situating itself upon the abyssal “foundation” of anxiety, modern aesthetic production and reception—as an interplay between activity and passivity—reverses the Cartesian gesture—the positing of an absolute foundation for rationally in the self-certainty of the subjective “I think.” In place of “I think” comes the “I doubt” (which preceded it in Descartes but was superseded there by the certainty of “I think”) that is at once an “I feel anxious”: cognition is reduced to doubting the possibility of its own self-transparency and separateness from a world that, in addition, might just turn out to be a delusion or a dream. Yet this very doubt—anxiety of thought and/or feeling—becomes thereby a new kind of aesthetic absolute, giving modernist and avant-garde aesthetic works and movements the intensity and extreme confidence with which we are familiar.

While emphasizing to some extent literary and other artistic texts (and so the “aesthetic” dimension), this course is interdisciplinary. It introduces the students to the theme of anxiety in modernist texts from psychiatry, philosophy, literature, opera, and visual arts. The main authors/composers/directors treated are Sigmund Freud, Melanie Klein, Maurice Ravel/Colette, Martin Heidegger, Rainer Maria Rilke, Franz Kafka, Alban Berg, Werner Herzog, and Ingeborg Bachmann. In the attached provisional reading list, I am imagining starting with four weeks of theoretical texts (psychoanalysis and philosophy), and then doing the literature, opera, and film. This will enable us to “apply” the theoretical notions of Freud and Heidegger to these aesthetic texts, i.e. to experiment with the relevance of their ideas to some of the artistic works that were created in the same period, and also to ask how these artistic works may introduce perspectives on modern anxiety that go beyond what psychoanalysis and fundamental ontology have to offer. I will also include, on the margins, some supplementary readings on the current DSM-V characterizations of anxiety disorders, and on current neurophysiological approaches to anxiety. These approached, which understandably aim for the most part to rid the subject of anxiety, will function largely as a contract with the high modernist approaches, some of which tend not only to validate anxiety, but to make it central to what remains of aesthetic and ontological transcendence. Students will write three papers and a comprehensive exam.

Emerson and Einstein, Interdisciplinary Artist Activists: An Inquiry into Genius

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 26600 1600-1750 MW CHA 303

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Poetry, philosophy, and science merge, converge, blur, and blend in this study of genius that rocked—and still rocks—our world. Bursting and bending disciplines, joyously defying definitions of field--Einstein the scientist played the violin, urged people to study poetry and wrote poetry himself; Emerson the poet urged people to study science and history-- Emerson and Einstein are epic iconic minds and legends defining their two centuries—and ours. Emerson said, “To be great is to be misunderstood.” Yet despite the seeming inpenetrabilities of e=mc2 and “The American Scholar,” lectures, journals, and essays considered “genius,” Emerson and Einstein were celebrities, famous as public intellectuals who were understood more than not, and popular. Probably the two most quotable people, it is as writers in the public realm and popular culture that they became movers and shakers, as metaphor-makers that they became change-agents. Their metaphoric imaginations challenged and changed science and social sciences in how we think about our world and what “matters,” from transformative emergent complexity and chaos theories to civil and human rights and environmental policies.

Humanities advocates, teachers and preachers shaping 19th and 20th century thought, respectively, their writings continue in our own century to be some of the most influential that have ever been published, spawning continuous revolutions in science, literature, and cultural understanding. As we examine these writings, we will ask, what makes them so powerful? We will investigate formative texts for these great minds’ own learning and development as writers. What did they come to believe and practice as intellectual leaders? How and why did they use their “authority” as peace activists for human rights? We will examine the paradox that such seemingly difficult thinkers express the power of knowledge in ways that seek a common world view, literally and morally, in terms of conscience, courage, empathy, kindness, and goodness. Feisty iconoclasts, Emerson and Einstein’s lives and writings inspire ways to see our world with imagination and insight as “miracle” worthy of excitement, awe, and wonder, and a rousing social critique to foster better behavior to one another.

The Jewish Diaspora in Latin America

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 424H/421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 26897 1000-1150 TR PLC 189

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

The coupling of the terms “Jew” and “Latino,” or “Jewish” and “Latin American” still elicits surprise and disbelief, especially among those who grew accustomed to identifying “Jewish” with “Eastern European.” However, a growing corpus of Jewish and Latin American literature increasingly demands that we acknowledge and confront both the Jewish contribution to the make-up of the Latin American cultural fabric, and the relevance of Latin American realities in shaping a distinctive Jewish identity.

 This course will study the presence of Jews in Latin America, the construction and representation of Jewish identity, as well as the relationships established between Jews and non-Jews in different Latin American countries. We will read literature written by Latin American Jews, watch movies that present their realities and conflicts in a very diverse region, and observe some of the Jewish contribution to the plastic arts. We will also listen to music by Jews in established Latin American genres, such as the tango, and traditional Jewish Sephardic genres which are now being recovered by contemporary singers.


Autobiography as Political Agency

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 424H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22649 1800-2050 M Salem

Professor: Anita Chari

This course is open only to CHC students, and requires an application, interview and instructor approval to register for this course. If you are not familiar with the Inside-Out Program, please check out the information on the Honors College website here: http://honors.uoregon.edu/story/inside-out-prison-exchange-program, and watch the Inside-Out documentary here: http://vimeo.com/5193052.

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

An Information Session about this course will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 4 at 5:30 pm in 303 CHA AND Wednesday, Nov. 5 at 4:00  pm in 905 PLC . The Application is available on Clark Honors College Blackboard, under "Forms.” Applications are due by 4:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 7 in Professor Anita Chari’s mailbox on the 9th Floor of PLC in hardcopy form only.

Interviews will be held during Week 7, and students will be notified of their standing by end of Week 8. Interview scheduling may be subject to change, please stay tuned.

This class will be held on Mondays, 6:00-8:50 p.m., inside the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem; transportation will be provided. We'll leave campus about 3:30p.m. and return by 10:20 p.m. The first day of class will be held on campus at 303 Chapman Hall.

This class explores the autobiography as a form of both personal and political expression. We begin by complicating, questioning and demystifying the divide between the personal and political by linking personal stories and histories with narratives of broader social structures, such as capitalism, patriarchy, slavery, and colonialism. We will read autobiographies from diverse sources, including diaries, quasi-fictionalized autobiographies, poetry, and autobiographies of political activists. We will also engage with theories of social structure and agency in order to engage with the interface between personal experience and political agency. Students will produce a significant body of writing in class and in homework assignments in order to create their own political autobiographies. Authors that we read in the class may include the following: Ralph Ellison, Gloria Anzaldúa, Hanna Arendt, Johnny Cash, Albie Sachs, Iris Young, Aimé Cesaire, Malcolm X, and Assata Shakur.

Human Rights, Peace and Conflict in the 21st Century

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 424H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 27242 1400-1650 M CON 330

Professor: Cheyney Ryan

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

We will explore the history and practice of human rights today and their role in today's political struggles for a better world. Our focus will be both theoretical and practical. We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of human rights, as they emerged from the 20th Century experience of war; and we will look at specific conflicts where they now play a role, focusing initially on conflicts around war, genocide, and economic justice.

Professor Ryan is a senior fellow at Oxford University, Department of Politics and International Relations, teaching winter quarter in the Clark Honors College.

Bodies and Artifacts

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22652 1600-1750 TR CHA 307

Professor: Joseph Fracchia

In a statement with which his contemporary Charles Darwin certainly would have agreed, Karl Marx noted in an offhand comment that ‘the first fact to be established for the study of history is the corporeal organization of human beings.’ This is quite a claim: for it entails the view that the histories of human societies and cultures are consequences and products of the peculiar corporeal organization of the human species. This focus on the evolved human body, the product of natural history, as the producer of culture(s) and therewith history, is the point where the insights and projects of Darwin and Marx meet. This point of intersection, accordingly, will be the fulcrum of this course. In the first half of the term, we will focus on “human corporeal organization” as the basis of human histories. Our focus will be on the ‘universal’ human body, i.e. the one that, regardless of its age, sex or race, any visitor to a zoo would recognize as human. Our goal, however, is not to develop a final or static definition of ‘human nature’, but to provide a general outline of those aspects of their corporeal organization that enable humans, as Marx aphoristically put it, ‘to make their own histor[ies],’ as well as those aspects that prevent them from doing so ‘as they please.’ During the second half of the course we will try to understand human worlds and their histories as products of human corporeal organization. More specifically, we will view human worlds as consisting of material, social, and cultural artifacts and attempt to decipher their corporeal roots. Here we will follow the guiding threads developed by Elaine Scarry who wrote of the body as the ‘interior structure of artifacts’.

This course is intended to be exploratory and experimental; and it will require the integration of material from the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Participants from all majors are both welcome and needed. Everyone will know a good deal about some aspect of this course, but no one (myself included) will know about everything. Thus, we will all have a lot to learn from each other.

Required readings will be drawn from a wide range of disciplines and include: Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain; Diane Ackerman, A Natural History of the Senses; Galen Cranz, The Chair; a variety of excerpts from Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, paleoanthropologist Andre Leroi-Gourhan, geneticist Richard Lewontin, philosophers Mark Johnson, Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, linguist Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, and some chapters from my current book project on this topic.

Written work: a weekly journal of commentary on the readings and/or ‘botanizing on the asphalt’; 15-page paper; Final Reflections.

Research and Changing Perspectives on Rapa Nui (Easter Island)

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22654 1700-1820 MW CHA 123

Professor: Terry Hunt

Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, has become widely known as a case study of human-induced environmental catastrophe resulting in cultural collapse. The island’s alleged tragic history is offered as a cautionary tale of our own environmental recklessness and flirtation with failure on a global scale. However, a closer look at the actual archaeological and historical record for the island reveals that while an environmental disaster unfolded, the ancient Polynesians persisted. Indeed the ancient people succeeded despite the odds. The only “collapse” came with epidemics of Old World diseases introduced by European visitors. Sadly, “ecocide” has been confused with genocide, intended or not, where today the victims have been blamed for their own demise.

In this colloquium, we assemble the evidence for the island’s astonishing prehistoric success, and explore how and why this most isolated and remarkable culture avoided collapse. Perhaps Rapa Nui has a lesson for us today, but it is not the one that has become so popular in recent years.

Students will read and critically discuss a variety of sources from archaeology, palaeo-ecology, history, evolutionary theory, and popular literature. The seminar will focus on how the story has changed dramatically in the light of new evidence and critical evaluation of the old. We set the seminar in the context of ongoing research as well as the recent book, The Statues that Walked. Students do not need prior coursework or experience in archaeology, just the motivation to learn across disciplinary boundaries.

Students will read and actively participate in class discussions, prepare and present a short (ca. 10-15 page) research paper on a topic of their choice with relevance to the issues cover. Students interested in archaeology, history, environment, ecology, evolution, popular writing, and the Pacific Islands should find this seminar interesting, informative, and relevant.

Experimental Philosophy, Theory and Method

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 26501 1400-1520 MW GSH 103

Professor: Mark Alfano

In the last ten years, a small group of philosophers has initiated a revolution in philosophical methodology. Instead of or in addition to analyzing concepts like intentionality, knowledge, and responsibility "from the armchair" by introspecting, these philosophers conduct experiments to see how real people really employ the concepts. The results can be surprising.

This course begins with an investigation of the side-effect effect, a phenomenon discovered by experimental philosopher Joshua Knobe. It turns out that people are more willing to say that someone brought about a side-effect intentionally when that side-effect is bad than when it is good. Many explanations have been offered for this phenomenon, most of which we will canvass.

The side-effect effect will then serve as a case study for the theory and methodology of experimental philosophy. How is scientific methodology best characterized? How is armchair philosophy's method best characterized? Is the methodology of experimental philosophy fundamentally distinct from that of social science? Is its method fundamentally distinct from that of armchair philosophy and empirically-informed philosophy? We will consider some of the many objections to experimental philosophy. It is argued that philosophical problems do not admit of experimental or empirical solutions, that the only way to address them is via intuitions. It is also argued that while experimental philosophy is respectable as such, most of the extant work in the field is unsound. We will follow some of the primary threads of the dialectic between experimental philosophers and their critics.

The City: Classical Athens, Renaissance Florence and 20th Century Berlin

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 434H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 26502 1200-1320 TR LIB 42

Professor: John Nicols

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Cities have traditionally been the catalyst to political, cultural, scientific and economic development. In this course we will look at the experiences of three cities. Ancient Athens formed the model for the "golden age" that has become the model to measure the achievement of western cities; Renaissance Florence is our second model of a city that enjoyed a golden age; Berlin in the 20th century had a urban experience that was both distinctive in its own right and yet also characteristic of what many other European cities experienced. We will devote about a third of the course to each of these cities.

The Role of Natural Disasters in the Collapse or Dispersal of Cultures

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 434H/441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 26483 1600-1750 TR LIB 42

Professor: Gregory Bothun

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Science Colloquium and an IC (International Cultures) Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

The role of natural disasters in the forms of volcanic eruptions, giant earthquakes, tsunamis, extended drought, extended extreme weather (usually cold), massive floods (e.g. Pakistan 2011), massive mudflows, and climate change, until recently have been rather overlooked as a dynamic mechanism for causing dispersal of the local culture or its total collapse. The result of any one of these listed disasters is to rapidly and catastrophically change the local landscape and the function of the land, thus possibly making the local environment unlivable. This course will focus both on the science behind the disasters and their overall frequency of occurrence in various regions of the Earth and on the cultural response to these disasters and possible cultural planning to avoid future disasters, since most cultures are unwilling to relocate away from their sacred soil. To make this course have contemporary relevance, we will also discuss the impact of the current global climate change (?) on various cultures living in various locations on the Earth. The course will be arranged around several case studies involving known events as well as some suspected, but still controversial and unverified events (e.g. The Black Sea Flood).

Mysteries of the Brain

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22655 1000-1120 TR CHA 303

Professor: Nathan Tublitz

One of the major unanswered questions in science concerns understanding the working of the human brain. How do we hear, see or feel in real time? How are we able to coordinate muscle movement so precisely that we can jump over a high bar or play the piano? How do we learn the most difficult of tasks, or acquire and utilize multiple languages? How do we think or dream? The human brain is, without question, the most incredible and most complex device ever created. It far surpasses the most advanced man-made computational devices. One goal of this course is to explore some of the mechanisms and complexities underlying brain function, focusing on diseases that impair brain activity.

The second, equally important goal of this course is to elucidate the principles underlying the scientific method of inquiry. The fundamental basis of science -- hypothesis testing using transparent and reproducible empirical methods and techniques -- provides a framework for knowledge acquisition by our society. This course aims to explore the benefits and limitations of modem day science, with a specific focus on neuroscience.

Climate Change Adaptation Planning

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22656 0830-0950 TR CHA 303

Professor: Bart Johnson

Explore how climate change, ecosystems and people interact in coupled human and natural systems to create the landscapes of the future.

Gain firsthand experience with emerging simulation technologies being used by planners and scientists to help citizens and decision makers chart new courses of action.

Learn how to proactively strategize ways to anticipate future hazards and to catalyze societal adaptation to global environmental change at local landscape scales.

One of the great challenges facing society in the 21st century is that people must craft and implement adaptive responses to climate and population change for which there is little, and in some cases no, historical precedent. To effectively adapt to climate and population change, we must anticipate future hazards, catalyze adaptive behaviors, and do so in ways that are robust to the inherent uncertainties of evolving threats, tipping points, and extreme events such as wildfires, storms and floods.

Because of the complex interactions among human and natural systems, both public and private sectors have increasingly turned to scientific, quantitative methods to inform landscape policy and decision making in the presence of uncertainty. In this class, we will apply an innovative explore-then-test approach that allows students, policy makers and citizens to investigate large numbers of potential future landscapes that could arise from land use and management decisions made every day in landscapes where people live and work. Class sessions are organized around a weekly rhythm of lectures and discussions based on common readings from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, followed by problem-solving sessions applied to a team-based class project using Envision (http://envision.bioe.orst.edu/), a spatially explicit modeling software that simulates landscape processes and human decision making, and is being used in a wide array of landscape planning projects. Under an award from the National Science Foundation to a collaborative, interdisciplinary research team lead by Bart Johnson and Envision’s developer, John Bolte of OSU, the model has been parameterized to simulate climate effects on an 80,000 ha study area to the south and east of the Eugene-Springfield metropolitan area, allowing the class to explore climate change adaptation in a familiar landscape easily accessible to students. Students will learn lifelong skills for exploring where, when and how climate change impacts may manifest, and how actions by landowners and policy makers may affect landscape qualities that are central to the quality of people’s daily lives.

Measuring the Online Workspace of the Mind

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22657 1200-1320 MW CHA 303

Professor: Edward Awh

We are all privy to a vast quantity of information stored within our memories. Yet, in any given moment, our ability to grasp that information is restricted to only a few items at a time. Likewise, objective measures suggest that despite our rich phenomenological experiences, our awareness of the world around us is restricted to only a few items at a time. In this course, we plan to offer an advanced tour of the cutting edge of research on the neuroscience and measurement of human attention and working memory. Attention describes the process by which we dedicate limited processing resources towards relevant aspects of our experience, while working memory refers to the inner workspace that comprises our conscious awareness and guide for overt behavior. In the current research literature, these constructs have become tightly interwoven; thus, this class will present a unified description of both from a cognitive and a neuroscience perspective.

Using reading material derived almost exclusively from academic journal articles, the class will take a tour across both seminal ideas and recent discoveries that are relevant to the limited capacity of human awareness. In addition, the class will include frequent laboratory demonstrations and some formal training in data collection. These exercises will involve published experimental protocols that provide a rigorous test of basic principles from this literature. Students will therefore acquire hands-on experience in the implementation, interpretation and presentation of cognitive experimental data.

Heroes and Anti-Heroes of the Sixties

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 444H/421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22659 1400-1550 MW CHA 303

Professor: Suzanne Clark

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill an Arts & Letters Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class.

This course is about the rhetoric of the sixties, including civil rights, student protest, and the Vietnam war era. While the international sixties is of interest, we will particularly examine the involvement of Oregon writers, filmmakers, musicians, and universities in this era of change, using films, literary, and rhetorical texts and documents as well as university archives. The focus will be on the period from the early 1960s era of civil rights activism to student protest and the Vietnam War. As the sixties went on, it was a period of increasing divisiveness. By 1970, the heroes to anti-establishment protestors (Ken Kesey, Martin Luther King, Mario Savio, Mark Rudd, Ray Brown, Bill Ayers,) were the villains to others, whose heroes were LBJ, Richard Nixon, S.I. Hayakawa, John Wayne, and Ronald Reagan.

Some thought they were fighting for a Revolution. But did the Revolution fail? Or does it live on in the next generations? What about the cultural changes in lifestyle, dress, food, music? We will carry out archival research and interviews as well as film and text analysis to write weekly response papers of 500 words to questions we pose, and one long research paper about the arguments involved in a particular event or text.

There will be guest speakers with special knowledge of that period, help from writers and archivists about effective uses of interviews, archives, collections, and documents. There will be final presentations and a final two-hour conference during which students and guests may present and discuss the ideas developed in their papers.

Texts and documents to consult: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest; Papers from archives and special collections of the University of Oregon, particularly the Kesey papers, the Robert D. Clark papers; the Ursula LeGuin papers, and Kenneth Metzler's Confrontation; selections from Long Time Gone: Sixties America Then And Now (ed. Alexander Bloom);

Films include: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, The March, Berkeley in the Sixties, The Weather Underground, Fire in the Heartland, and two more.

Interviews and guest speakers include members of the faculty, writers, former student activists, journalists, former administrators, perhaps FBI agents, and others.

Thesis Prospectus

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22660 1700-1850 T CHA 303

Professor: Terry Hunt

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization. Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project. The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted).

Provide the completed and signed Application, one-page thesis idea, and one-page bibliography to Academic & Thesis Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic & Thesis Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited.

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic & Thesis Coordinator.

Thesis Prospectus

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 22662 1400-1550 R CHA 303

Professor: Sander Goldberg

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization. Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project. The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted).

Provide the completed and signed Application, one-page thesis idea, and one-page bibliography to Academic & Thesis Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic & Thesis Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited.

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic & Thesis Coordinator.

Thesis Prospectus

Winter term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 Credits

CRN 22661 1200-1350 M LIB 102

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted).

 

Provide the completed and signed Application, one-page thesis idea, and one-page bibliography to Academic & Thesis Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic & Thesis Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic & Thesis Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic & Thesis Coordinator.