Fall 2014 Course Descriptions

Rights, Incarceration, and American Values

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12830 1800-1850 w 307 CHA

Professor: Shaul Cohen

Student Leader: Nina Sobotka

The purpose of our time together is to build community while using our passions and talents (art, science, writing, nature, sports, etc.) to make critical social issues that affect each and every one of us feel relevant. Discussions will center on topics related to incarceration in the United States. Watching Orange is the New Black and reading works by Angela Davis and Glen Loury will inform our dialogue with one another, guest speakers, and individuals we meet on our field trips. Weeks 1-4 will be spent building common knowledge and language, building relationships with one another, and developing individual interests related to incarceration. During weeks 5-10, we will visit two correctional institutions, participate in events both on and off campus, and develop practical skills with which to engage our communities in conversation about the nature of democracy in a country in which 1 out of every 31 adults is under a form of correctional control, including jail, prison, probation, or parole. Welcome to the CHC community!

Neuroscience of the Human Experience

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12831 1900-1950 r 130 GSH

Professor: Samantha Hopkins

Student Leader: David Adams

Right now, as you read the words that compose this course description, your brain and visual system are hard at work. As light is bouncing off of (or being absorbed by) the page, photons are altering the shape of photoreceptors in the retina, and these changes are transduced into electrochemical signals, the basic units of the brain’s language. Those messages zip through intricate neural pathways in a matter of milliseconds, and the brain creates a perceptual image, which allows you to see. With the help of many other neural systems, the brain is able to decode the meaning of complex symbols and patterns, such as letters, words and sentences in order to comprehend language. Indeed, the seemingly elementary task of reading requires a lot of computing power, and that is found in a mass of nervous tissue encased in our skulls.

The human brain, weighing a meager three pounds, is made up of billions of neurons and glial cells that determine everything about who we are, and its unique structure and abilities are essential to the human experience. In this CHIP we will explore topics relating to the mind’s amazing machine and begin to get a very broad picture of the fascinating field of neuroscience, by learning about how the brain works in our readings, and what happens when things go wrong through case studies. We will explore the immense academic and research opportunities that the University of Oregon has for undergraduate students on campus, and the numerous academic and career paths in the region. In our in-class lab demonstrations, we will see how neurons fire, how vision works, and will get to hold a real human brain. As a final project, we will work in groups to investigate a hypothetical set of neurological symptoms in order to generate diagnoses and suggest possible treatments. Of course, there will be plenty of out of class social activities as well.

Condensed Fiction

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12832 1700-1750 r 130 GSH

Professor: Helen Southworth

Student Leader: Inina Kachelmeier

Throughout history, stories have been told in many ways. From cave drawings to Twitter feeds, they have always surrounded us. This CHIP focuses on the types of stories we tell everyday: short narratives. Each week we will read or watch stories from a variety of genres including short stories, slam poetry, manga, and film. Field trips will include a visit to see slam poetry at Tsunami Books. The goal will be to explore the social and ethical issues around us today through fiction, to learn more about the creative opportunities in Eugene, and to become accustomed to creating art of our own.

Media CHIP−Storytelling: Entering the Creative Cloud

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12833 1700-1750 t 131 GSH

Professor: Mark Carey

Student Leader: Jesse Summers

The way stories are being told is changing. Writing books and newspapers is no longer the primary medium to tell a story through. Today, social media is the primary way to tell a story. Whether that is through Facebook, Twitter, blogging or the next big social media craze, the way people tell their stories and the number of people who have access to those stories has been changed forever. This course will take a critical look at the art of storytelling in our digital age. We will explore the various media platforms that have become popular for University of Oregon students (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) as well as for people across the world. We will analyze a variety of media samples to gain a sense of the stories that are being told and the stories that are not being told. Through this, we will become more aware of the media messages that we interact with every day and the importance of our own creative voice.

Note: This is a residential CHIP housed in the Global Scholars Residence Hall.

Bike Touring in Eugene

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12834 1000-1050 F 303 CHA

Professor: Ocean Howell

Student Leader: Mary Vertulfo

Learn about bike safety and the rules of the road while learning to navigate Eugene, Oregon by bike! This CHIP will introduce students to the different neighborhoods in Eugene and give students an idea about how to safely get around town. We will go on several bike rides over the course of the CHIP, and we will learn about Eugene’s awesome history with bike-friendly roads. Come have fun and join the growing group of urban cyclists in Eugene and at the University of Oregon!

Why We Make the Decisions We Do

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12835 1900-1950 w 203 CHA

Professor: Terry Hunt

Student Leader: Ryan Sherrard

Have you ever wondered why we often act against our best interest? Why we fail to complete our New Year’s Resolutions? Why do we buy things we don’t need, or even particularly want? The answer to these questions lies in the field of Behavioral Economics, which examines the reasons why we make the decisions we do. In this CHIP we will be answering these, and other questions, while exploring Behavioral Economics. The course will be taught through a combination of readings, films, and experiments we will perform in order to better understand the often counter-intuitive nature of humans. This course does not require any experience in Economics or Psychology, only an interest in better understanding human behavior.

Lights, Camera, Science!

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12836 1700-1750 t 130 GSH

Professor: Abigail Owen

Student Leader: Annelise Cummings

Albert Einstein once wrote, “the most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious — it is the source of all true art and science” and “play is the highest form of research.”

This course is designed for prospective scientists and artists to have a chance to play together in a collaborative environment while learning about the science and art of photography. Students will be honing their abilities to identify the artist’s intention and the scientist’s objectives. In addition, students will work to develop their personal message as artists and scientists. During this course, students will learn not only how to make a camera, but the science behind the camera and the art of consciously creating a portfolio while collaborating with other artists. Students will have the opportunity to hear from professors studying optics in the Physics department and film in the Cinema Studies department. Students will also have the chance to travel to science and art centers around the university and the greater Eugene area.

If you are an aspiring scientist or artist, this CHIP is for you.

Note: This is a residential CHIP housed in the Global Scholars Residence Hall.

Ethics

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12837 1930-2020 w 130 GSH

Professor: Sander Goldberg

Student Leaders: Kayla Bucolo and Tia Monahan

There are ethical dilemmas all around us, from something as simple as should you run a red light at a vacant intersection, to sacrificing one life for the needs of the many. Because college is a place to define yourself, there is no better time to explore your core beliefs. In this discussion based CHIP, we will collaborate in small groups and as a class about different ethical dilemmas and how our opinions and views differ. We will talk about what drives our opinions and people’s choices – religion, race, gender, class, etc – and talk freely about our true beliefs without fear of criticism or punishment. You will have the opportunity to explore new topics you might not have thought about before, and propose topics that you find interesting. There is no book required for this course, but you will be asked to read short ethical articles outside of class in order to prepare for each week’s topic. In addition to introducing you to the principles of ethics, this course is also designed to help incoming students learn about the Honors College and the University in general. We will tour Chapman Hall at the beginning of the term, talk about study tips for midterms and finals, explore resources available to you through the Honors College, the University, and Eugene, and help you register for classes.

Finding Your Voice: Memoir

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12838 1900-1950 t 130 GSH

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Student Leader: Emma Ivie

Memoir writing is an exploration of the self. It is a courageous adventure in the deep unknown that is our collective body of experiences we call our life. Memoirs are one of the purest forms of writing in which we can share our experiences. In this CHIP, we will explore writing models, looking at the works of famous memoirists such as David Sedaris and Isabel Allende, and we will harness the power of memoirs to help each of us find and express our unique literary voice. We will look at examples of contemporary memoirs and delve into the many elements that go into creating a truly spectacular memoir. Our inquiries into the nature of memoirs will include: examining the use of vulnerability, considering the role of hyperbole and exaggeration, and exploring the use of voice. Together we will embark on an investigation of memoirs, and individually we will learn to unleash our remarkable voices through writing.

Note: This is a residential CHIP housed in the Global Scholars Residence Hall.

Theatre Arts

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12839 1700-1750 w 203 CHA

Professor: Louise Bishop

Student Leader: Nicholas Maurer

Theatre is a unique art because it capitalizes on every other art from for a single theatrical creation. Through the process of theatre we can learn to communicate effectively as well as collaborate with others towards common goals.

This course will be split into two parts:  1) production, 2) playwriting and story creation. The course will introduce students to campus and local theatre communities as well as other exciting and unique communities in Eugene.

This course introduces students to the university through a common lens rather than through intensive intellectual challenge. I encourage freshmen with a deep interest in the Theatre Arts Department to register for a Theatre Arts (TA) class.

The Art of Science

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12840 1800-1850 t 130 GSH

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

Student Leader: Alyssa Bjorkquist

Science. It’s a beautiful and versatile field that is responsible for explaining everything around you. While you read this sentence, the Earth is hurtling around the Sun at over 10,000 miles per hour; tectonic plates are shifting miles beneath your feet; your visual centers in the brain are currently processing and perceiving that the little black squiggles on this page are actually a language; and the plants outside are engaging in photosynthetic reactions that produce the air we breathe! In this CHIP, we will explore what it means to be a scientist in the 21st century. We will examine the morals and ethics behind scientific research, how liberal arts and science complement and challenge each other, the role social media plays in modern science, and what it means to be a scientist at the University of Oregon on a local, national, and global scale.

To help elucidate the concepts taught in class, have fun, and bond with each other we will embark on field trips to the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History, the Saturday Market in Downtown Eugene, a hike along the McKenzie River and a swim in natural hot springs! In class, we will engage in provocative discussion, interact with a wide display of media, and even get the chance to hold a human brain. No matter where your academic interests lie, this CHIP will help you gain a broader appreciation and knowledge for the science that has made our world possible.

Unforeseen Eugene

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12841 1800-1850 w 203 CHA

Professor: Kevin Hatfield

Student Leader:  Celia A. Easton Koehler

Unforeseen: not anticipated or predicted. As a college freshman you are faced with the invigorating, nerve-racking situation of immersing yourself in a new experience, a new space, one that cannot be anticipated or predicted, not by you or anyone else. No one will experience Eugene the way you do. Oh the excitement! The CHIP is about accessing opportunities in the varied and various communities in Eugene, both within the University and beyond. It will provide a peephole into the array of communities and hubs in the Eugene area and provide students with strategies and means to access them. We will talk about what we have to offer to our communities (what are out curiosities, passions, skills, etc.) and in turn what our communities have to offer us. In this CHIP we will: talk about our obligations towards involvement in our community, peruse local newspaper and other forms of media, go on poster-event hunts around campus, talk about our broad-ranging interests, taste local foods, and much, much more!

2,000 Years On!: The Cultural Impact of Science Fiction

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12842 1400-1450 F 303 CHA

Professor: Vera Keller

Student Leader: Anna Lind

The future is here, with not as many jetpacks and flying cars as we expected. Those creative and ambitious individuals who gave us these fantastic expectations had once dared to imagine the future and all of its potentials. Now, as our species advances farther into the future, we begin to see which of their imaginings are becoming our reality. In this CHIP we will observe how numerous films, novels, radio shows and short stories of the science fiction genre have impacted the progress of the latest technology and the collective culture of the human race. The class will be required to read Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card, and in November we will journey to Portland for the annual sci-fi writing convention, OryCon. No particular love of sci-fi is needed to be a part of this CHIP. It is my goal as your leader to present you with challenging, intriguing material and perhaps over the course of the term develop your appreciation for the genre. Together we will embark on a mission to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, and to boldly enter into the University of Oregon community.

The Era of East Asian Pop Culture

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12843 2000-2050 r 130 GSH

Professor: Susanna Lim

Student Leader: Deborah Wang

Where do East Asian (China, Japan, Taiwan, Korea, etc) stars and pop culture fit in with a society where big names such as Leonardo Dicaprio, Miley Cyrus and Jennifer Lawrence dominate the tabloids? What can we learn about the different East Asian cultures through entertainment mediums like movies, music, TV shows, etc.? This CHIP will delve into ideas such as these by spending time not only consuming these various forms of media but also discussing points and ideas brought up in articles and videos. In addition to having fun watching and listening to shows and music, we will also be discussing the implications of the various cultures they represent and how these contrast or correlate with Western culture. This class will be for students who find themselves constantly dancing along to the latest Big Bang song, students who can dramatically sing along to the "Attack on Titan" opening song, and for the student who has no idea what the last two sentences mean. You don't have to be an expert in the East Asian Entertainment field to join. You just need to be willing to embrace this different form of pop culture.

Through the Looking Glass: How Race and Gender Shape our Sports

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12844 1700-1750 R 131 GSH

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Student Leader: Katherine Wight

Did you know Lebron James’ single season salary is 20 times more than the WNBA team salary cap? This CHIP will explore the sports culture of today’s society and how these inequalities have become accepted. Specifically, we will focus on how race and gender have shaped this culture through different media such as articles, documentaries, commercials, and mainstream movies. These different forms of communication will be able to show the inequalities and discrimination that we as viewers often ignore. Make sure to come to class ready to learn more about what these terms mean in regards to anthropology as well as discussing how they relate to sports. Keep your mind open and be prepared to discuss and share opinions with others.

Beyond the Moonwalk

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 199H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12845 1600-1650 M 123 GSH

Professor: Casey Shoop

Student Leader: Paul Pham

Welcome to the Beyond the Moonwalk CHIP. This CHIP will teach you the fundamentals of the dance style that originated from the street.

Furthermore, we will also be exploring the origins of street dance. In this course, we will explore the 3 styles of dancing: Breakdancing, Locking and Popping from the basic to the intermediate level. No background in dancing is needed. Furthermore, there will be a unit to learn how to dance like Michael Jackson. That is right! You will learn some of the most iconic dance moves that made the King of Pop famous, including the moonwalk

Note: This is a residential CHIP housed in the Global Scholars Residence Hall.

How Marine Organisms Work

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 207H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12846 1000-1120 TR 103 GSH
CRN 12847 1200-1320 F TBA Lab

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

Important note: This course includes TWO MANDATORY field trips scheduled for Oct. 11 and 12 (Overnight trip to OIMB) and Nov. 8 (Day trip to Strawberry Hill).

A beautiful and stunning diversity of organisms live beneath the ocean’s surface along the Oregon coast. How do these organisms perform and ultimately, survive, in the marine environment? In this course we will use a biomechanics approach (study of biological solids and fluids) to understand how body shape, material properties and movement influence interactions with the physical environment and with other organisms. We will focus on the organism-scale and, in particular, on interactions with the fluid environment (e.g. how water movement influences predation). Through field trips, laboratory studies, discussions and team projects we will become familiar with local marine organisms and use quantitative tools to understand organism performance and adaptation. By the end of this course, you will be familiar with the diversity of marine organisms from the Oregon coast. You will also develop an understanding of how these animals ‘work’ as well as some tools and methods for studying functional morphology. This course will also provide resources and contacts for students interested in further Marine Biology coursework at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB) or majoring in Marine Biology.

Course requirements: Assignments will include readings from the primary literature, 2 written summaries of primary literature articles, 3 laboratory write-ups and a final project with a team oral presentation. Summaries of primary literature articles will help students become familiar with the format of science writing and will help students to hone their scientific writing skills in preparation for the final research proposal, in which each student defines a research question of their choosing. Students researching similar topics (teams of 4) will present their proposed research as a team at the end of the course.

Be sure to register for the Lab portion under CRN 12847.

How Marine Organisms Work - LAB

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 207H 0.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12847 1200-1320 F 130 HUE

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

See course description under CRN 12846. Be sure to register for this Lab under CRN 12847 in addition to the Course under CRN 12846.

Literatures Old and New

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12848 0830-0950 TR 307 CHA
CRN 12856 1000-1120 TR 307 CHA

Professor: Helen Southworth

We will read a selection of ancient through early modern works of literature and consider them alongside more recent versions of and twists on these classic stories.  We’ll also explore some of the recent Digital Humanities projects focused on this period of literature.

Sacred Texts: The Bible and the Koran in Literature and Film

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12849 0830-0950 MW 103 GSH
CRN 12858 1000-1120 MW 103 GSH

Professor: Susanna Lim

This course focuses on two texts that have not only been central to the development of ancient civilization, but whose influences are felt well into our modern age: the Bible and the Koran. Taking these two works as starting points, we will explore how the ideas, characters, images, and narrative elements of these holy texts have shaped literary and cultural texts from the medieval period to our modern age.

Our reading list will include passages from the Old and New Testaments (Genesis, Job, the Gospels), "Inferno" from Dante's Divine Comedy, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Evgeny Zamyatin’s We, passages from the Koran, selections from One Thousand and One Nights, Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories, and Arabian Nights and Days by Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz. We will also be considering films in relation to the literary topics in discussion.

This course will be a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentations. Its goals are to help first and second year students develop critical reading and interpretation skills, as well as to polish academic writing skills and engage with the opinions of literary scholars. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two papers (4-5 pages), one small group presentation, and active participation in class.

Heroes, Heroines, and Virtue

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12851 1200-1320 tr 307 CHA

Professor: Frances Cogan

We will be exploring the extent and nature of heroism and heroinism as these appear in literature from Homer’s Odyssey to the anonymously-written Chinese classic The Journey to the West.  In each case we will explore what standards apply to these extraordinary characters and how culture influences these heroic portraits.  We will simultaneously study the genre of poetry – narrative, dramatic, and lyric.

Works to be studied will include the following: Homer’s Odyssey; Sappho’s poetry; Euripides’ Medea; Apollonius of Rhodes’ Argonautica; Beowulf; the Poema de Mio Cid; and Journey to the West.

There will be three papers required, and a take-home final.

In the Beginning…

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12852 1400-1520 tr 303 CHA

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

… there was sex, violence, betrayal and survival. Indeed, the world’s best-selling book has it all. And we will read some of it in this first course of the Clark Honors College Literature sequence, devoted to the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Pentateuch, or Torah (The Five Books of Moses).

Genesis is a book full of beautiful and compelling narratives that contain stories crucial to the whole of Western culture. From the creation of the world, to the creation of a nation, in Genesis the reader finds stories about conflicts between fathers and sons, husbands and wives, and favored and slighted brothers, not to mention the tensions between God and God’s creatures.

Our project is to try to forget what we think we know about Genesis and read the text with open eyes, following it slowly, carefully and closely, admiring its terseness, concreteness and poetry. We will savor the text, embracing its gaps and seeming contradictions, and seeking its overall cohesiveness. Through our reading(s) and our analysis, we will “hear” the plurivocality of the biblical text.

We will read Genesis in Robert Alter’s translation, and our focus on the book itself will be punctuated by interpretations and recreations of the biblical text by modern writers. Among the poets we will read are Emily Dickinson, Wilfred Owen, Yehuda Amichai, Dan Pagis, Jorge Luis Borges, and Louise Glück.

Literary analysis is our goal and method, but this course has a heavy writing component, so there will be many writing assignments in different genres, including opportunities for creative writing and research. Writing is a process and a skill; it needs to be practiced: students will also revise their main paper extensively, in order to understand the recursive nature of writing.

This course is not suited for those who read the Bible literally, or for those who assume that all readers of the Bible are literalists.

Family Ties

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12853 1400-1520 MW 303 CHA

Professor: Sander Goldberg

Not everyone is, was, or will be a parent, but everyone is (or was) a child. What the older generation owes its children—and what those children may owe in return—is thus a perennial question and a recurrent theme in western literature of all periods. What are the goals and obligations of child-rearing and the responsibilities of children to those who rear them? Do those obligations remain constant over time, or do they change with advancing years and the inevitable shift of competence and capability as the young grow old and the old grow older?

This course will draw from a set of texts that all deal in one way or another with the often fraught relationship between parents and their children. It has two goals. First, its focus on pre-modern literature inevitably raises the question of what texts remote in time, style, and form have to say that remains relevant to the modern world, not to mention the practical matter of what reading strategies are appropriate for teasing out their meaning. A second, more general goal is no less important, i.e. honing skills in how to read and think about literary texts and how to communicate those thoughts effectively to others. Accomplishing these goals will require spending significant time talking and writing about our target texts—and then critiquing our talking and writing.

There will be weekly writing assignments, investigative group projects, and a final exam exercise. Readings will include works by Homer, Euripides, Terence, Vergil, Augustine, Chaucer, Montaigne, and Shakespeare.

Comparative Strategies

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 Credits

CRN 17373 1200-1320 MW 303 CHA

Professor: Katherine Brundan

In this course, we will read influential early modern texts and examine their rewriting through more modern cultural productions. We will focus very carefully on language, performing close-reading written assignments most weeks to practice this fundamental literary skill. Language is the star player in these texts – more so than we might expect – so we will pay special attention to linguistic matters from rhetoric to riddles, insults to inscription, speech to silence. We will pay close attention to the phenomenon of translation, comparing short sections of different translations. These texts all involve careful strategies (particularly linguistic ones), When examining the modern rewritings, we will interrogate the reworking of the original text into a new form and a new language. There will be two essays, with plenty of scope to develop individual interests.

Texts include: Sophocles’s Oedipus Rex, Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams (selection), Euripides’s Medea, Dante’s Inferno, Birk’s Dante’s Inferno, The Letters of Abelard and Heloïse, Choderlos de Laclos’ Dangerous Liaisons.


Syllabus

EPIC! Or, My Life as The Odyssey

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12855 1600-1750 mw 307 CHA

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

In the woods, on the wine dark seas, following the yellow brick road-- witches and monsters and tempters at every bend and even in the mirror: this seminar explores the power of story to illuminate our lives as a momentous learning journey. In today’s culture we say “epic” to mean something enormous, whether a sandwich, wave, or adventure, although most people do not think of our own everyday lives as so large-scale. As individuals and in teams, our class will read and recreate –and argue translations of--a handful of famous pre-modern classic epics featuring Homer’s The Odyssey, including Dante’s Divine Comedy, Gilgamesh, Virgil’s The Aeneid, Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac, and Cervantes’ Don Quixote. We will ask why and how classics can matter in our world today. 

Tracking today’s “classic” covers of epic in literature and film through the lens of our iconic models, such as Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Whitman, and filmed stories such as Wizard of Oz, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, and Tarsem’s The Fall, we will get to the root of epic meaning by creating our own dramatic enactments, do scholarly and critical analysis and close readings, and reflect on films and texts, in journals, poems, and essays. We will ponder classics’ enduring power as we creatively engage with the way minds make heroic the struggle to tell us the story.  Thousands of years old, invoked by the Muse, chanted around a fire, or expressed as poetry, personal essays, lyric drama, or film musical, these works of epic imagination have influenced historic civic heroes from John Muir, Anne Frank, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, The Freedom Writers, Gandhi, Nikki Giovanni, to Dr. Paul Farmer. How can preposterous and outlandish and idiosyncratic epic scenarios possibly mean something to us in our own lives today?  

Through the magic mirror of epic, works on love and war and identity and life dreams and goals may reflect our own real life struggles. Dante’s dark woods, the Walden woods where Thoreau saunters to “live deliberately,” Dorothy’s whirlwind journey in Oz, Odysseus’s turbulent seas, or the mirror in which Cyrano and the beast confront themselves, may reveal our own lives as epic terrain—and the wild and heroic in each person’s journey.

Force and Law in Premodern Literature

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12857 1200-1320 TR 303 CHA
CRN 12860 1000-1120 TR 102 PETR

Professor: Casey Shoop

Philosopher Simone Weil famously described the Iliad as a poem about force:  “that x that turns anybody who is subjected to it into a thing.” The definition is both precise and elusive. What is the nature and meaning of this implacable force in the premodern world? How is it measured and understood by those people upon whom it falls? What does it mean to become a thing?  Weil’s description has the virtue of turning interpretation away from the traditional preoccupation with heroism and free will, and toward questions about violence and representation, suffering and the power of human culture and institutions to intervene in its effects. How does the representation of force change in different literary and historical contexts? Does the institution of the law, whether human or divine, moderate and limit the power of force to turn people into things? Or is the law itself merely another expression of force?

 In this course, we will examine the nature of force and its relationship to the law in premodern literature from the Iliad through Greek tragedy, and from the Old to the New Testament in the Bible. We will be especially interested in how literary forms (epic poetry, tragedy, philosophical dialogue) imagine and respond in myriad ways to the force of subjection. Along the way we will consider how these premodern texts enable us to reflect critically upon our own contemporary moment in often surprising ways.

Listening to Wisdom

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 221H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12859 1200-1320 MW 307 CHA

Professor: Louise Bishop

What counts as knowledge in pre-modern societies? What makes knowledge last? What, if anything, differentiates knowledge (scientia) from wisdom (sapientia)?

Stories – narratives -- carry knowledge in its many forms in both pre-modern and modern societies. In his book The Literary Mind (Oxford UP, 1996), Mark Turner suggests that narrative—story--is the foundation of language itself. Yet in the western Renaissance or early modern era, story becomes devalued as "mere story"—so Francis Bacon called it in 1626. Modernity makes history into story's opposite: history gives us fact rather than fiction, story gives us imagination rather than reality. Aren't facts more important than fiction?

Reading pre-modern texts attentively and carefully can help us understand the value of narrative and our own positions within a sea of story, from movies to YouTube. We'll use many kinds of tales (a tale is also a "mere story," according to the OED) and their "translations" (meaning "to carry, to transfer") to grapple with representations of self and other, and with the value -- and devaluation -- of imagination and emotion. We'll let the root of education -- educare, to lead forth -- lead us to new intellectual and emotional understandings as we consider the ways pre-modern cultures produced and saved these tales. We’ll also investigate how and why we’ve gotten our hands on them in 2014-2015 Oregon. Your literary journey starts here.

Possible choices for texts include The Epic of Gilgamesh, Prometheus Bound, The Book of Job, Consolation of Philosophy, The Mahabharata/Bhagavad-Gita, The Vita Nuova, Hamlet. Close reading is vital; interpretive muscle grows from it. Written work for the class will include ungraded response papers, two 1500-word formal papers, class presentations, and a comprehensive final examination. Some special events related to the class, such as films or readings, will be arranged during the term.

Creating Community in the Pre-Modern World

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 17290 1400-1520 TR VIL 201
CRN 17298 1700-1820 TR PLC 189

Professor: Michael Peixoto

As today, people in the pre-modern world distinguished between insiders and outsiders and developed cultural practices for dealing with this complicated dichotomy. In this course, we will explore the question of how groups of people living before 1450 formulated concepts of community.  Focusing primarily on examples from the Middle Ages in both Europe and the western areas of Asia, we will examine the creation of community in two key ways.  First, we will look at the inclusive practices that defined the way the members of a community related to each other. These practices incorporate the creation of common laws, customs, and beliefs, but also involve displays of power, wealth and status that could elevate or diminish individuals within an internal social hierarchy.  Second, we will study the concept of definition by exclusion and look at the ways in which groups of people formulated their own identity through markers of difference from those who they perceived to be outside the group. 

The class will begin with the study of pre-modern sources and the challenge that these types of media pose for the modern historian.  We will then explore our duel themes of inclusive and exclusive group identity through nine sub-themes: material culture, law, authority, history, topography, outsiders, belief, food, and death.  We will read texts written in the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish traditions and our readings will address a wide range of topics, including trade, ritual, violence, memory, propaganda, and theology.  Through a close examination of primary sources along with select articles from leading scholars on the subject, students will come away with a better understanding of how people in the Middle Ages understood their own place in society and interacted with those around them.

Creating Community in the Pre-Modern World

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 231H 4.00 Credits

CRN 17297 0830-0950 MW LIL 255

Professor: Michael Peixoto

As today, people in the pre-modern world distinguished between insiders and outsiders and developed cultural practices for dealing with this complicated dichotomy. In this course, we will explore the question of how groups of people living before 1450 formulated concepts of community.  Focusing primarily on examples from the Middle Ages in both Europe and the western areas of Asia, we will examine the creation of community in two key ways.  First, we will look at the inclusive practices that defined the way the members of a community related to each other. These practices incorporate the creation of common laws, customs, and beliefs, but also involve displays of power, wealth and status that could elevate or diminish individuals within an internal social hierarchy.  Second, we will study the concept of definition by exclusion and look at the ways in which groups of people formulated their own identity through markers of difference from those who they perceived to be outside the group. 

The class will begin with the study of pre-modern sources and the challenge that these types of media pose for the modern historian.  We will then explore our duel themes of inclusive and exclusive group identity through nine sub-themes: material culture, law, authority, history, topography, outsiders, belief, food, and death.  We will read texts written in the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish traditions and our readings will address a wide range of topics, including trade, ritual, violence, memory, propaganda, and theology.  Through a close examination of primary sources along with select articles from leading scholars on the subject, students will come away with a better understanding of how people in the Middle Ages understood their own place in society and interacted with those around them.

Human Encounters and the Origins of Historical Knowledge

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 231H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12861 1000-1120 MW 303 CHA
CRN 12863 1000-1120 TR 104 CON

Professor: Tim Williams

This course explores the ancient and medieval world. In particular, we will focus on fundamental questions of historical thinking that remain relevant today: Why remember the past? For whom is the past important? How does the study of the past explain the reality of the human condition? And what tools have groups used to disseminate that knowledge? To answer these core questions about the nature of history we will explore historical thinking across various cultures, places, and periods in the pre-modern world. On the one hand, we will focus on the traditional canon of historical thought in "western civilization," including historical works produced by the ancient Greek, Roman, and Hebrew people. On the other hand, we will also explore groups such as Slavic peoples of Eastern Europe and indigenous peoples of North America, who are typically neglected in the study of "western civilization."

We will read a wide range of primary sources from each of these traditions--including epic poetry, biblical texts, oral accounts, biographical works, and early confessional writing--as well as scholarly literature. These sources will not only draw us deeply into the cultural and intellectual history of the pre-modern world but they will also provide the raw material for understanding why individuals in the past pursued historical knowledge. We will explore these themes in regular class discussions and frequent writing assignments. By the end of the course, all students should feel grounded in the history of the premodern world, be able to discuss comfortably the complexity of historical knowledge and its varied uses, and demonstrate proficiency in written analysis of assigned texts.

Premodern Histories of Agriculture and the State

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 231H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12864 1000-1120 MW 307 CHA
CRN 12868 1200-1320 MW 248 PLC

Professor: Abigail Owen

Using examples from the Americas, Eurasia, the Ancient Near East, and Ancient China, this course will introduce students to histories and surviving sources, or types of evidence, that give us insight into the beliefs, horizons, and practices of Paleolithic and Neolithic human settlements, and for premodern agrarian states and empires. We will consider evidence and narratives about the Neolithic transition to agriculture for different geographic regions; some benefits and perils of intensive rice cultivation in Ancient China, and the significance of agricultural settlement for the Chinese state; what it meant to be ruler and ruled in states and empires of the Ancient Near East; and how evidence about the migration of linguistic groups might give us clues about ancient languages, social organization, and early state formation. Course readings and activities will incorporate ancient texts; consideration of archaeological evidence, including visits to both the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Museum of Natural & Cultural History on the University of Oregon campus; and an overview of other methods of analysis of agricultural and social changes from the ancient past, for example, through the use of linguistic, genetic, and archaeobotanical evidence.

Sources of the Self

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 231H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12865 1400-1650 R 361 PLC
CRN 12870 1100-1350 F 303 CHA

Professor: Vera Keller

With the advent of social networking sites and their emphasis on narratives of the self, the self has become a subject of increasing activity, creativity, and prominence in the everyday lives of contemporary college students. Historians of the book have pointed to the profound societal changes in which changing textual technologies from the codex to the computer have been implicated. Changing media can help transform conceptions of the self and its relationship to communities, society, cultural production and consumption, intellectual property, social change, and ideas of the public sphere.

The self has long been assumed to be a hallmark of both modernity and American culture. This course challenges such assumptions by exploring the varying sources of the self - autobiographies, portraiture, diaries, confessions, etc.- from antiquity to the early modern period across Asia and Europe.

Premodern Histories of Agriculture and the State

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 231H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12867 1400-1520 mw 307 CHA

Professor: Abigail Owen

Using examples from the Americas, Eurasia, the Ancient Near East, and Ancient China, this course will introduce students to histories and surviving sources, or types of evidence, that give us insight into the beliefs, horizons, and practices of Paleolithic and Neolithic human settlements, and for premodern agrarian states and empires.

We will consider evidence and narratives about the Neolithic transition to agriculture for different geographic regions; some benefits and perils of intensive rice cultivation in Ancient China, and the significance of agricultural settlement for the Chinese state; what it meant to be ruler and ruled in states and empires of the Ancient Near East; and how evidence about the migration of linguistic groups might give us clues about ancient languages, social organization, and early state formation.

Course readings and activities will incorporate ancient texts; consideration of archaeological evidence, including visits to both the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Museum of Natural & Cultural History on the University of Oregon campus; and an overview of other methods of analysis of agricultural and social changes from the ancient past, for example, through the use of linguistic, genetic, and archaeobotanical evidence.

Forensics

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 399H 1.00-5.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12871 1800-1920 TR 140 ALL

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

Clark Honors College hosts the nationally ranked University of Oregon Forensics Program. HC399 Forensics teaches students to excel as researchers and advocates through instruction and participation in intercollegiate debate, mock trials, and individual events competitions.

The program travels to about thirteen tournaments, hosts two large on-campus tournaments, and engages in various on-campus speaking activities. Debate students will be paired with partners and will be expected to conduct extensive research on the debate topics selected by the Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and/or the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA).

Students interested in mock trial (AMTA) are joined with others to create 10-person teams for competition. Oregon Forensics prepares students to find their voice, which means not only helping students reach reasoned opinions and conclusions about important events but also developing the suite of skills they require to be ethical and effective advocates for their perspectives. Novice and experienced students are welcome: Absolutely no prior experience is required. Oregon Forensics produces scholars, leaders, and champions. Please visit the program website for more information.

This course is open to ALL UO students (not only Clark Honors College students) to enroll.

Syllabus

Thesis

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 403H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12872 tba tba tba

Professor: TBA

Internship

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 404H 2.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12873 tba tba tba

Professor: TBA

Reading

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 405H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12874 tba tba tba

Professor: TBA

Special Problems

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 406H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12875 tba tba tba

Professor: TBA

Thesis Orientation

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12876 1100-1550 SAT 10/18 only 303 CHA

Professor: Ocean Howell

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.  Food and beverages will be provided.


Thesis Orientation

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 408H 1.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12877 1700-2150 Thur 10/16 only 202 CHA

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. The workshop examines research questions in different majors, suggests tactics for identifying potential thesis advisors, and helps students map out their thesis timetable in light of program requirements and opportunities, such as studying abroad.  Food and beverages will be provided.


Practicum

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 409H 1.00-12.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12878 tba tba tba

Professor: TBA

Writing the Journey: Studying and Practicing Travel Writing

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12879 1600-1720 tr 307 CHA

Professor: Elizabeth Bohls

Travel can be transformative, jolting the traveler out of her comfortable world-view - or it can serve to reaffirm that complacent perspective. It can be difficult and dangerous, true to its roots in the concept of "travail" (labor, toil, hardship, suffering)-or convenient, even luxurious. Before trains, planes, steamships and the Internet, travel and travel writing were important sources of information or knowledge about other cultures and little-known areas of the globe. We'll read a variety of travel and exploration writing from the sixteenth century to the present day, focusing mostly on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. At the same time, each student will compose and refine his or her own account of a journey of some kind-whether distant and exotic or close to home, undertaken for leisure, education, work, or family necessity. We'll share and critique these as part of the course. Questions we'll ask about our own and other authors' travel include: how do the conditions of travel (e.g., working or leisured, voluntary or compulsory) shape the traveler's experience? How do travelers' preconceptions shape their experiences, and under what conditions do these preconceptions get overturned? What rhetorical devices or strategies do travel writers use to represent their encounters with unfamiliar cultures and strange people, and what do these reveal about travelers' deep desires and fears? What is tourism, and how, historically, did it come into being? How do travelers impact their "travelees" - those who inhabit the places they visit or colonize?

Advanced Topics in Leadership

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12880 1000-1150 mw 408 LAW

Professor: Dave Frohnmayer

Professor: Barbara West

The central concern of the course is the way in which we describe and understand leadership and acts of leading—and why they matter. The course focuses on a small number of topics central to theories of leadership including totalitarianism, charisma, ethics, and the heroic leader. A concluding section will focus on leadership challenges in the modern university. We will examine the topics through the lenses of political theory, history, psychology, neuroscience, sociology, literature, art, and organizational behavior and test insights from both classical and modern theorists. We will also investigate how theoretical concepts about personality, training, character, and environment help us explain the principled or unprincipled exercise of power and influence. Close reading of a summary monograph from PS 199 “Theories of Leadership” is a prerequisite for the course. Requirements include both a mid-term research paper and a final project—an extended bibliographic essay on a major theme or question.

Literature by and About Gay Men

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 424H/421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12881 1000-1120 tr 303 CHA

Professor: Henry Alley

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium, and an IP Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IP Multicultural class.

The texts are Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (short novel), Forster’s Maurice (novel), Ginsberg’s “Howl” (long poem), Puig’s Kiss of the Spider Woman (novel), Kushner’s Angels in America (play), Kramer’s Women in Love (screenplay), Fierstein’s Torch Song Trilogy (play), Black’s Milk: The Shooting Script (screenplay) and selections from The Penguin Anthology of Homosexual Verse.

The course will provide an overview of gay men’s literature as it has evolved from ancient times to the present day. We will discuss how social acceptance has both grown and created more backlashes, as dramatized in the literature. We will look at four tragic perspectives in Wilde, Kramer, Puig, and Black, three epic outlooks in Forster, Ginsberg and Kushner, and one comic point of view in Fierstein. These works will trace out the birth of the gay man’s Arcadia, where two lovers may retreat from adversity, to the development of the gay marriage and family in the twentieth century. We will have a special look at the war against homophobia, particularly as expressed in the life and work of Oscar Wilde, Allen Ginsberg, and Harvey Milk.

There will be two short papers and one long one. A reading journal will be optional. Occasional quizzes will be given. There will be a strong emphasis on discussion, and videos of several of the works will be available or recommended—Women in Love, Kiss of the Spider Woman, Torch Song Trilogy, Angels in America, Howl, and Milk.

Encountering Antarctica from the 18th to the 21st Centuries

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12883 1600-1720 tr 303 CHA

Professor: Alessandro Antonello

The Antarctic is a cold and inhospitable region of the earth. A massive ice cap covers the continent and the seas surrounding it are treacherous. Yet it is also a living region, with a significant marine ecosystem and small pockets of life clinging to the edge of the continent. Humans are part of that web of life, and Antarctica has a fascinating human history that encompasses some of the fundamental issues of the modern and contemporary worlds. This course considers some of the major events and themes in Antarctic history from the late eighteenth century to the present, including: the voyages in the southern oceans of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; the exploitation of seals and whales in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the ‘Heroic Age’ of discovery between 1897 and 1922; territorial claims, sovereignty, geopolitics and nationalism in the first half of the twentieth century; the geophysical and biological sciences after 1945; conservation and environmentalism after the 1960s; travel and tourism; and the contemporary diplomacy of the Antarctic Treaty System. In the process of understanding Antarctic history, this course examines major questions and themes relating to the history of science and discovery, environmental history, imperialism and colonialism, geopolitics and diplomacy, and cultural and social history. Students will complete several pieces of writing, including a major research essay on a topic of their own choice. This course will also encourage students to use history for the present, and students will work on ways of bringing their historical knowledge of the Antarctic into contemporary discussions surrounding international governance for, and human relations with, Antarctica.

Revolution and Exile in the 18th -century French Atlantic: France, USA, and Haiti

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 434H/421H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 16910 1400-1550 tr 103 GSH

Professor: Gordon Sayre

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium, and an IC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

The American and French Revolutions established our modern political ideologies of nationalism, freedom, equality, tolerance and human rights. For those who lived through these revolutions they were not always a matter of noble principles, but often a horrifying ordeal of fear and violence. Writers, artists, and intellectuals who experienced the years from 1775 to 1800 in America, France and the Caribbean witnessed enormous and frightening changes not only in the political world but in the aesthetic one as well.

The third and oft-overlooked Atlantic Revolution established the Republic of Haiti, the first black-majority nation of the modern post-colonial era. This course examines the trans-Atlantic connections between France, the new United States, and the French colony of Saint-Domingue, and looks back at the formative stage of French colonization in Louisiana earlier in the 18th century. Of particular interest is how exiled authors accustomed to a life of privilege dealt with the toppling of the social hierarchy that supported them, and how sexuality and gender became part of moral and political debates that sought to refashion politics, power, and propriety. We will read novels, memoirs, and travel narratives by French and American writers.

Climate & Culture in the Americas

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 434H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12884 1200-1350 mw 191 ANS

Professor: Mark Carey

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium, and an IC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an IC Multicultural class.

Climate change is not just about temperature and weather; nor is only about the present and future. Distinct societies have both conceived and been affected by climate change in different ways, from ancient societies like the Maya to present-day groups from Alaska to Chile. Indigenous people in particular are disproportionately affected by climate change and natural disasters, yet they are often marginalized from policy and academic discussions. Moreover, discussion of indigenous people and climate change opens up a much broader discussion about environmental knowledge across diverse cultures, as well as environmental management, race and class dynamics, and the intersection of local, national, and global issues. Students enrolled in this course will learn about climate-culture issues throughout the Western Hemisphere, with a particular focus on Latin America, and from an historical perspective up to the present.

This is a unique course offering students an extraordinary opportunity because the course will culminate with a student conference on "Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples," which will include keynote presentations, class visits, and feedback on student projects from two internationally distinguished speakers for the conference: Myrna Cunningham Kain from Nicaragua and Patricia Cochran from Alaska. Dr. Cunningham Kain is an internationally renowned advocate for Indigenous peoples’ rights and women’s rights who has served recently as chair of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (2011-2013). Patricia Cochran is currently Executive Director of the Alaska Native Science Commission. All students in the course will write a major research paper on a topic of their choice, so long as it coincides with general course themes. Students will gain valuable experience presenting this work in oral or poster presentations at the conference. Students will also be presenting their work alongside undergraduates from tribal colleges doing climate-related research, who will visit class and help illuminate these critical issues from their diverse perspectives. The close intersection of this HC 434H course and the conference serves to promote student research, showcase the work of Clark Honors College students, provide professional experience for students, and generate dialogue about critical issues of indigenous peoples, climate change, and the cultural contexts of environmental knowledge. (For more info on the conference, see http://ccip.uoregon.edu/).

Relativity, the Quantum, and Reality

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12885 1200-1320 tr 307 CHA

Professor: Michael Kellman

We will explore the profound conceptual challenges in thinking about nature brought about by two of the great revolutions in science of the twentieth century: special relativity and quantum mechanics. We will first explore each of these theories at a deep but simple level, using elementary examples. We will then explore the extremely strange things that happen when we try to put these theories together. We will begin with readings from Newton and Leibniz on absolute space and time, itself a revolutionary idea when propounded in the seventeenth century at the dawn of modem science. Next, we will explore the change in thinking about space and time brought about by the theory of relativity, especially Einstein's revolutionary understanding of 1905. We will perform an intense reading of Einstein's famous popular text on relativity, still one of the clearest expositions, and a fascinating insight into the mind of this great thinker. Then we will explore the revolutionary changes brought about in the early twentieth century with the advent of quantum mechanics, the theory of the microscopic world. We will again pursue the most basic understanding, probing the famous wave particle duality with the two-slit experiment, following the renowned treatment of Feynman. After dealing with the perplexing situation of the notorious "Schrodinger's cat" the course will culminate with an exploration of the mind-boggling things that happen when we try to put the relativity and quantum theories together. The predictions of each theory separately, and together, have been verified in all experiments with astonishing accuracy. However, with the joining of relativity and quantum mechanics, profound and bizarre problems arise – conceptually things just don't make complete sense! We will see that perhaps the deepest problem is what Einstein called the "spooky action at a distance" in "entangled" quantum systems that comes about when we include relativity. Quantum magic results, challenging our deepest ideas of "reality." This course is intended as a serious exploration of some of the most fascinating ideas that have come out of the modem scientific revolutions that took place first in the seventeenth century with the advent of Newton's physics, and then in the twentieth century with the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. There will be an emphasis on original texts of leading thinkers; written composition; and serious mathematical treatment that is up to the task, but at an elementary precalculus level accessible to intelligent students of various backgrounds. The needed mathematics will be introduced in a tutorial fashion, either as review or new material depending on personal background. The course is not intended to be primarily for students majoring in science - Honors College students majoring in fields other than natural science may well be the greatest beneficiaries.

History of Space Flight

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 441H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12886 0900-0950 mwf 303 CHA

Professor: James Schombert

The history of exploration is a sequence of humankind breaking physical barriers using new technology. Whether the next valley, over a desert, or across the ocean, it was the development of the wheel, domestication of animals and the invention of sailing vessels that has allowed the adventurer to explore. The last barrier to our civilization is the gravitational well of our planet that stands between us and outer space. Even Socrates (500 B.C.) was aware of the importance of space flight when he said "Man must rise above the Earth - to the top of the atmosphere and beyond - for only thus will he fully understand the World in which he lives." This course is a historical review of the people, goals and technologies involved in the exploration of outer space. While normally thought to be a recent enterprise, the history of space flight actually goes back to early rockets developed by Chinese scientists around 1000 B.C. The quest for space continues today with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS), our first semi-permanent habitat in orbit. Of the human endeavors, space flight differs from previous achievements since it deals with an environment which is extremely hostile to the human body (the arctic was cold, but at least there was oxygen). Because of its perilous nature, the race for space is one of the few examples in human history where the need to explore drove the development of previously unknown technology. One of the objectives of this class will be to outline how technology was intimately linked to space exploration and to trace how our vision of space flight has changed over the years. Another objective of the course is an examination of the types of people involved in the exploration of space. There are few other enterprises in recent history that involve such diverse personalities as space flight. For example, an Air Force flight surgeon in the 1950s acted as his own guinea pig during 20 rocket sled experiments where he still holds the record of surviving 40 times the force of gravity. The effects of space flight on the human body were completely unknown before 1962, and there are numerous examples of individual heroism. The NASA mentality, the 'Right Stuff', the Apollo 13 disaster, John Glenn's return to space on the Space Shuttle are all examples of how space flight is much more than a simple technological achievement.

Decolonizing Research & the History of the Northern Great Basin and Northern Paiute

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 444H/431H 4.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12887 1400-1520 tr 201 LIB

Professor: Kevin Hatfield

Professor: Jennifer O'Neal

Graduation Requirement: This class will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Elective Colloquium and an AC Multicultural class.

This course is underpinned by the values of community-based, inter-cultural, de-colonizing, multidisciplinary research, and authentic discourse among Native and non-Native students, historians, and scholars.  Through collaborations and shared decision-making about research agendas, modes of inquiry, categories of analysis, dissemination of knowledge, and philosophies of scholarship with members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and the Burns Paiute Tribe, the course will position students to create new knowledge and contribute original research to this field of study.  The instructors and course partners have submitted official documentation with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Tribal Council and Department of Culture and Heritage, and have conferred with community members to develop a set of research topics and questions for the students to examine.

Students will engage in an “apprenticeship” in the historian’s craft, and perform communitybased research projects organized around a central case study of the cultural history of the Northern Great Basin and the Northern Paiutes.  Student will perform original research in archival and oral sources.  This course will also provide students with training in ethical methodology for researching Native American history, especially regarding primary sources which are an integral part of the research project. Based upon Ms. O’Neal’s experience, research, and knowledge concerning Native American archives she will introduce students to the complexities of these collections, including why many records reside at non-Native repositories, specific issues that arise regarding their care and dissemination, and how to properly interpret and analyze the records. She will present historical context and detailed information about proper protocols for research and dissemination of Native American archives. In addition, students will also be trained in the proper guidelines and procedures when working directly with Native American communities. The training ensures that the students will gain new ways of learning and knowing, not simply based on facts and content, but rather rooted in the concepts of empathy, reciprocity, and knowledge traditions.  The class will confront questions of “academic colonialism,” the “activist scholar,” indigenous ways of knowing/rationalities, and contested cultural paradigms of scholarship.

A field research experience in central Oregon will contextualize students’ research, and afford an insitu learning environment for living community memory and oral history. At sites including the Warm Springs Reservation and Museum, Smith Rock State Park, Crooked River Canyon, Des Chutes County Historical Museum, and the High Desert Museum students will enjoy access to unique archival and oral sources, highlighted by interaction with Wilson Wewa, spiritual leader of the Northern Paiute and Washaat longhouse; Myra Johnson Orange, Northern Paiute tribal elder; Jim Gardner, author of the forthcoming Oregon Apocalypse: The Hidden History of the Northern Paiute; Valerie Switzler, Culture and Heritage Manager of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; Carole Leone, Executive Director of The Museum at Warm Springs; Kelly CannonMiller, Executive Director of the Des Chutes County Historical Society and Museum; and Julie Johnson, Randall Lewis and Ruth Lewis of the Burns Paiute Tribe.

The educational system, and often particularly the writing and instruction of history, has been a site of oppression, assimilation, and ethnocide controlled by dominant culture metanarratives. Hence, this class will adopt an anticolonial and liberatory pedagogy (methods of teaching and learning), and approach history as a way of thinking, a way of knowing, and a way of engaging in communitybased social reconstruction, rather than simply the memorization and mastery of an ethnocentric “canon” of content.

Student are highly encouraged to visit the course and Northern Paiute History Project website for more information and photographs of the Fall 2013 class and field research experience. http://blogs.uoregon.edu/hc444f13hatfield

Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12888 1000-1150 W 189 PLC

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator. 


Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12889 1700-1850 W 303 CHA

Professor: Terry Hunt

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator. 


Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12890 1730-1920 R 303 CHA

Professor: Terry Hunt

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator. 


Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12891 0800-0950 W 248 PLC

Professor: Monique R. Balbuena

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator. 


Thesis Prospectus

Fall term, 2014-2015
HC 477H 2.00 cr. Credits

CRN 12892 1600-1750 T 221 FR

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Students present prospectuses orally to the class, with primary thesis advisors present. Course requirements include submitting a revised Thesis Prospectus and completing a Graduation Audit. Thesis Prospectus is graded Pass/No Pass.

 

NOTE:  HC 477—Thesis Prospectus requires pre-authorization.   Complete the Thesis Prospectus Application form, which is available on the CHC Blackboard site, only after taking the time necessary to formulate, in collaboration with a primary thesis advisor in the major, the outline of a thesis project.  The form requires the primary thesis advisor’s signature (verified electronic signatures are accepted). Provide the completed form to Academic Coordinator Miriam Jordan in person (122 Chapman Hall) or electronically (mjordan@uoregon.edu). The Academic Coordinator requires the form at least two weeks prior to a given term’s initial registration period. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

 

Students who do not file applications in a timely manner will be asked to take Thesis Prospectus the following term. Address questions about the thesis process to your CHC advisor. Address questions about Thesis Prospectus enrollment to the Academic Coordinator. Students who need to submit an application from abroad should email the Academic Coordinator.