Fall 2021 Course Descriptions

HC 101H: Introduction to an Art Practice

Professor: Liska Chan

4.00 credits

• CRN 16480: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:50 @ CHA 202

• CRN 16499: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 202

Introduction to an Art Practice will introduce interdisciplinary art inquiry. Methods and theory will be explored through watching films, doing readings, writing, rewriting, and above all, making artwork using ordinary objects. Read more


 

HC 101H :The U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Professor: Tobin Hansen

4.00 credits

• CRN 16483: Monday & Wednesday, 08:30-09:50 @ CHA 201

• CRN 16493: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00-17:20 @ TYKE 340

What is a border? This course examines the U.S.-Mexico borderlands region and the historical legacies of its peoples, cultures, and politics. Read more


 

HC 101H: The Art and Science of Human Flourishing

Professor: Kate Mondloch

4.00 credits

• CRN 16487: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-13:20 @ CHA 301

• CRN16492:Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30-09:50 @ CHA 202

For millennia, cultures have contemplated the question of human “flourishing:” an existence filled with deep satisfaction, well-being, resilience, and accomplishment. Read more


 

HC 101H: Malaria

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

4.00 credits

• CRN 16488: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20 @ CON 360

This course examines the vector-borne disease, malaria, from an inter-disciplinary liberal arts perspective. We will consider malaria and its corresponding technologies in Africa from many different disciplines and perspectives, recognizing how these different approaches contribute to more complex and accurate understanding of a challenging disease. Read more


 

HC 101H: Artificial Intelligence: the Culture of Minds and Machines

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 16489: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-13:20 @ PETR 102

• CRN 16490: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20 @ CON 203

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Philip K. Dick’s titular question frames the concerns of this course on the relationship between minds and machines. Read more


 

HC 101H: Matter and Impermanence

Professor: Rachel Rodman

4.00 credits

• CRN 16500: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-13:20 @ STB 151

Digestion and decay. The development of a flower from a seed. The action of your muscles when you walk or run, the burning of a fire.

Life. Read more


 

HC 101H: Writing the Genome

Professor: Rachel Rodman

4.00 credits

• CRN 16486: Wednesday & Friday, 14:00-15:20 @ MCK 121

In this course, we will learn about genomes: what they consist of, and how they are organized, and how they have been written and rewritten, via accidental copying errors, over the course of millions of years. Read more

HC 101H: Epic Influencers: Leadership, Poetry, and You

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 16496: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20 @ CHA 201

Epic rules! In this course, we are sleuths, investigating the case for and evidence of the questionable theory that poetry is an instrumental aspect of leadership. Read more


 

HC 101H: Bondage & Freedom

Professor: Timothy Williams

4.00 credits

• CRN 16501: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20 @ CHA 201

• CRN 16504:Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-13:20 @ CHA 201

This course takes its title from Frederick Douglass’s second autobiographical narrative, My Bondage, My Freedom (1855). Douglass’s title underscores the greatest contradiction of American life: The United States was founded on the ideals of freedom but nevertheless has supported and benefited from the bondage of others. Read more


 

HC 101H: Philosophy of Food

Professor: Hannah Cutting-Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 16494: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ MCK 473

“Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.” – Jean Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826) In this class we will examine philosophical questions about what we eat and why we eat it, a fascinating and interdisciplinary exploration of humans’ complex relationship with food. Read more

HC 101H: Symmetry

Professor: Lindsay Hinkle

4.00 credits

• CRN 16699: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-13:20 @ ANS 193

• CRN 16700:Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30-09:50 @ CHA 201

The symmetry of a pattern provides visual interest.  The symmetry of a molecule affects its function.  But what does it really mean to be symmetric or to have symmetry?  How do these definitions change from one discipline to the next?  Read more


 

HC 101H: Expanding the Archive: Piecing Fragments and Filling Silences

Professor: Monique Balbuena

4.00 credits

• CRN 16495: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20 @ CHA 202

• CRN 16491: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-13:20 @ CON 260

The “archive” roughly refers to our records of the past. How are our memories recorded and included in the archive? How is history recorded and remembered? Which voices are registered in the archive, and which forgotten? What is preserved and what is discarded? How can we add to the archive and inscribe those about whom no words were written? Read more

HC 101H: Dogs, Past & Present

Professor: Lisa Wolverton

4.00 credits

• CRN 18200: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30-09:50 @ TYKE 340

• CRN 18201: Wednesday & Friday, 08:30-09:50 @ CON 104

As workers and companions, dogs have shared human history virtually from its origins. For dogs, the first domesticated animals, human society has always been their natural habitat. Understanding dogs therefore requires analyzing their relationships to and meaning for people. Read more

HC 101H: The Psychology of Pilgrimage

Professor: Shoshana Kerewsky

4.00 credits

• CRN 18230: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ CON 201

What is a pilgrimage, and why are so many people drawn to explore its variations? Read more

HC 221H: African Philosophy

Professor: Beata Stawarska

4.00 credits

• CRN 12916: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-13:20 @ CON 330

This course provides an overview of contemporary African philosophy, that is, intellectual contributions and scholarly debates pursued by philosophers working primarily on the African continent. Read more


 

HC 221H : Playing with Poetry

Professor: Tze-Yin Teo

4.00 credits

• CRN 12917: Tuesday & Thursday, 17:00-18:20 @ FEN 119

"The toy," wrote the French poet of decadence and modernity Charles Baudelaire, "is the child’s earliest initiation into art." Must poetry be about learning the rules? Is poetry confined to the formal expression of feeling? Read more


 

HC 221H: Political Shakespeare

Professor: Brent Dawson

4.00 credits

• CRN 12919: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00-13:20 @ PLC 353

This course focuses on Shakespeare’s second set of history plays, known as the Henriad. Read more


 

HC 221H: Cinematic Religion

Professor: Erica Mongé-Greer

4.00 credits

• CRN 12920: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20 @ TYKE 340

This course looks at film and tv series that directly reference a deity or deities as a reflection of how “god” is conceived in modern culture. Read more


 

HC 221H: Evolution and the Modern

Professor: Suzanne Clark

4.00 credits

• CRN 12921: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00-17:50 @ CHA 202

The Origin of Species, published by Darwin in 1859, caused an immediate sensation.  He argued that species have not been created in one unchanging form, that even humans have evolved,--from animals; he argued that Natural Selection chose how varieties would change and survive in an ongoing struggle for life. Read more


 

HC 231H: Oral Advocacy

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

• CRN 12937: Wednesday & Friday, 10:00-11:20 @ ANS 193

Rhetoric and argument have been the foundation of a liberal education for more than 2000 years. Read more


 

HC 231H : Schools and Society

Professor: Edward Olivos

4.00 credits

• CRN 12939: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:20 @ MCK 473

Students in this course will examine conflicting perspectives and beliefs about public education within the context of increased racial/ethnic and social diversity in schools. Read more


 

HC 231H: Policing Masculinities: Race, Gender, and State Power

Professor: Tobin Hansen

4.00 credits

• CRN 12940: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ LIB 322

This course explores the shifting meanings; expressions; and social, cultural, and political implications of masculinities from a comparative cultural perspective. Read more

HC 231H : Global Food Security

Professor: Galen Martin

4.00 credits

• CRN 12941: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ PLC 353

A fundamental challenge for humans has always been the procurement of food. The human historical human experience has been marked by periodic localized and regional famine. Read more


 

HC 231H : Facing Climate Change: Inequality and Action

Professor: Leigh Johnson

4.00 credits

• CRN 12942: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ TYKE 340

This course orients students to the challenges that climate change poses for human wellbeing and socioeconomic development in both the Global North and South and familiarizes you with some of the many avenues for taking informed action towards transformation. Read more


 

HC 241H : Nature of Sound

Professor: Lisa Munger

4.00 credits

• CRN 16629: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20 @ TYKE 340

• CRN 16637: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ CHA 301

Sound is an essential component of natural habitats, and it is critical to the survival of many organisms. In this course, we will take an interdisciplinary approach to explore the role of sound in terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Read more


 

HC 241H: Neuroscience Perspectives on Drug Policy

Professor: Christina Karns

4.00 credits

• CRN 16632: Monday & Wednesday, 17:00-18:20 @ ANS 193

Psychoactive drugs are a pervasive part of modern life. As the lines blur between recreational drugs and pharmacological treatments, a neuroscience perspective on these issues may clarify policy and public health implications of the changing times. Read more


 

HC 241H: Sea Sick: Disease Ecology in the Ocean

Professor: Reyn Yoshioka

4.00 credits

• CRN 16638: Monday & Wednesday, 08:30-09:50 @ CHA 301

In 2013, sea stars along the North American west coast began to melt away. As the disease outbreak unfolded, it was soon clear that this was one of largest marine wildlife epizootics recorded, affecting over a dozen species of sea stars and decimating their populations. Read more


 

HC 241H: Knowing and Saving our Relatives: Primate Ecology and Conservation

Professor: Larry Ulibarri

4.00 credits

• CRN 17084: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00-17:20 @ STB 253

Primates are our closest relatives, and many are on the edge of extinction. Conserving primates and their habitats requires an understanding of their ecology. Read more


 

HC 241H :Decision Making for Sustainability

Professor: Kenneth Doxsee

4.00 credits

• CRN 17085: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00-15:20 @ CHA 202

Through a series of readings, guided discussions, and analyses of case studies, this course will provide students with the broad scientific and behavioral knowledge needed to make informed decisions and engage in thoughtful discourse about various contemporary issues in the realm of sustainability. Read more


 

HC 241H: Atoms: Mother Nature's Legos

Professor: Rebecca Altman

4.00 credits

• CRN 16631: Tuesday & Thursday, 1600-1720 @ GSH 103

This course will explore how mother nature uses atoms in the same ways we use Legos: to develop art, function, and creativity. Read more


 

 

HC 277H: Thesis Orientation, Fall 2021 - Paty

Professor: Carol Paty

2.00 credits

• CRN 16725: Friday, 10:00-11:50 @ CHA 202

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 277H: Thesis Orientation, Fall 2021 - Munger

Professor: Lisa Munger

2.00 credits

• CRN 16728: Thursday, 12:00-13:50 @ FEN 105

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 277H: Thesis Orientation, Fall 2021 - Hinkle

Professor: Lindsay Hinkle

2.00 credits

• CRN 16729: Wednesday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 201

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 277H: Thesis Orientation, Fall 2021 - Baldwin

Professor: Dare Baldwin

2.00 credits

• CRN 16730: Monday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 201

• CRN 16731: Tuesday, 14:00-15:50 @ STB 151

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 277H: Thesis Orientation, Fall 2021 - Mossberg

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

2.00 credits

• CRN 17092: Monday, 16:00-17:50 @ CHA 202

Thesis Orientation is two-credit class (graded pass/no pass) that introduces CHC students to the thesis process.The CHC thesis is the culmination of work in a major—a natural outgrowth from and expression of the ideas, problems, and approaches taught in that particular discipline or field of study. Read more


 

HC 301H: Climate Change and Place

Professor: Leslie McLees

4.00 credits

• CRN 16738: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ MCK 473

This course will provide a spatial understanding of how climate change occurs both from a scientific perspective and a cultural perspective.  Read more


 

HC 301H: Food and Colonialism

Professor: Hannah Cutting-Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 16739: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20 @ CHA 202

• CRN 17112: Monday & Wednesday, 08:30-09:50 @ CHA 202

In this course students will develop basic research, writing, and presentation skills in the discipline of history. We will spend the first part of class narrowing down individual research topics and discussing recent scholarship that models the various questions historians ask of this topic and the different methods they use to answer them. Read more


 

HC 301H: Mitigating Barriers to Mental Health Care

Professor: Deanna Linville

4.00 credits

• CRN 16740: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00-15:20 @ CHA 201

• CRN 16742: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00-17:20 @ CHA 201

This course is an introduction to the structural and systemic barriers that exist for accessing mental healthcare. We will explore the barriers that prevent people from accessing mental healthcare more generally, existing strategies for mitigating these barriers and mental health disparities. Read more


 

HC 421H: Lie to Me: Techniques in Prose Fiction

Professor: Ulrick Casimir

4.00 credits

• CRN 12958: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00-15:50 @ TYKE 340

The goals of this course are deceptively simple: to refine your understanding of the rudiments and mechanics of fiction writing, and to foster the development of habits vital to the future production of solid, expressive prose (which includes but is not limited to literary prose), beyond the confines of this course. Read more


 

HC 421H: From Power Boys to Proud Boys: The Sturm und Drang of the American Far Right

Professor: Rebecca Schuman

4.00 credits

• CRN 12961: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20 @ CON 330

We all watched on January 6, 2021, as the apex (perhaps nadir) of the contemporary American far right played out live before our eyes: The storming of the U.S. Capitol. And while insurrectionists’ motivations seemed both obvious and obtuse — a gnarl of Read more


 

HC 431H :Planning the City

Professor: Eleonora Redaelli

4.00 credits

• CRN 12962: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30-09:50 @ CHA 301

The course examines the praxis of planning focusing on plans as text. We will examine plans of American cities. Read more


 

HC 431H: The Language of Truth

Professor: Eric Pederson

4.00 credits

• CRN 12966: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00-15:20 @ CON 330

How does one know when someone is telling the truth? How do we indicate when we are or are not telling the truth? How do languages vary in their expression of truth statements? Read more


 

HC 434H/431H: The Whale

Professor: Ryan Jones

4.00 credits

• CRN 12967: Wednesday, 14:00-16:50 @ MCK 349

Graduation RequirementThis course will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and a Global Perspectives (GP) area of inquiry requirement.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and a GP area of inquiry.

The Whale examines human relationships with cetaceans from a number of different disciplinary perspectives. Read more


 

HC 434H/431H: What is Socialism Anyway? A European View

Professor: Ian McNeely

4.00 credits

• CRN 12968: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:50 @ CHA 301

Graduation RequirementThis course will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and a Global Perspectives (GP) area of inquiry requirement.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and a GP area of inquiry. Read more


 

HC 434H/421H: Achille Mbembe: Multiplicity, Exclusion, and Entanglements

Professor: Michael Stern

4.00 credits

• CRN 16748: Thursday, 16:00-18:50 @ PETR 102

Graduation RequirementThis class will fulfill an Arts & Letters Colloquium and a Global Perspectives (GP) area of inquiry requirement.  If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and a GP area of inquiry. Read more


 

HC 434H/431H :Biography as History: Analyzing African Political Leadership since the 1950s

Professor: A.B. Assensoh

4.00 credits

• CRN 17821: Thursday, 14:00-16:50 @ CHA 301

Graduation Requirement:  This class will fulfill a Social Science Colloquium and a Global Perspectives (GP) area of inquiry requirement.  If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this class will fulfill both of the following requirements:  an Elective Colloquium and a GP area of inquiry. Read more


 

HC 441H: The Art of Biology

Professor: Reyn Yoshioka

4.00 credits

• CRN 17956: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00-17:20 @ ANS 192

Often framed as separate and opposing disciplines, science and art are more similar than not. With science communication more important than ever, researchers are constantly working to find diverse and far-reaching ways to share their work. Read more


 

HC 441H: Cosmology

Professor: James Schombert

4.00 credits

• CRN 17996: Tuesday & Thursday, 17:00-18:20 @ ANS 192

Cosmology, the study of the formation and evolution of the Universe, has progressed from its origins in early man’s ideas of Nature, to Chinese and Greek world views, to Dante’s vision of Heaven and Hell, to Newton’s Clockwork Universe. Read more


 

HC 441H: From Forest to Farm to Table: The Ecology and Evolution of Food Production

Professor: Krista McGuire

4.00 credits

• CRN 12969: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-13:20 @ CHA 301

In this course, we will explore the origin of some of the major food items we consume, the genetics of domestication, and the ecology of environmental impacts of food production systems. Read more


 

HC 441H :Energy Now: The Science Behind Current Energy Practice and Policy

Professor: Alexandra Rempel

4.00 credits

• CRN 12970: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:20 @ ANS 192

The effects of climate change are now evident worldwide, and their connections to fossil fuel consumption are clear and convincing. Read more


 

HC 441H :Oxygen

Professor: Victoria DeRose

4.00 credits

• CRN 12971: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00-15:20 @ CHA 201

Oxygen, the breath of life, once poisoned the earth. The Great Oxygenation Event of over billion years ago that began an oxygenic atmosphere is also termed the Great Catastrophe, reflecting the struggle for survival that resulted in our ultimate survival and reliance on a simple molecule that can be created through the power of sunlight in photosynthesis. Read more


 

HC 441H: The Art of Data Manipulation

Professor: Rebecca Altman

4.00 credits

• CRN 16744: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30-09:50 @ ANS 192

 Do you ever wonder what the numbers reported in the news actually mean, or where they come from? How do you know you can trust the story the numbers are telling... or the story the authors are saying the numbers are telling? Read more


 

HC 441H: Physics of Sport

Professor: Ben McMorran

4.00 credits

• CRN 18231: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-13:20 @ STB 154

Sports do not require detailed knowledge of physics - athletes are able to make rapid judgements and accurate predictions about complex physical systems without the use of equations or computational analysis. Likewise, physics does not require athleticism nor even an appreciation of sports. Yet studying sports through the lens of physics provides a way to gain deeper insight into both. Read more

HC 444H/421H: Black Rebellions

Professor: Faith Barter

4.00 credits

• CRN 16745: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00-11:50 @ CHA 301

Graduation Requirement: This course will fulfill both of the following requirements: an Arts & Letters Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken an Arts & Letters Colloquium, this course will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy. Read more


 

HC 444H/431H: The (Ir)Relevance of Law

Professor: Alison Gash

4.00 credits

• CRN 17823: Tuesday, 14:00-16:50 @ CHA 301

Graduation RequirementThis course will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this course will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy.

This course examines the degree to which American law has either abandoned or is hostile to the interests of marginalized communities. Read more


 

HC 444H/431H :Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Writing for Social Justice

Professor: Carol Stabile

4.00 credits

• CRN 16746: Friday, 09:00-11:50 @ CHA 301

Graduation RequirementThis course will fulfill both of the following requirements: a Social Science Colloquium and US: Difference, Inequality, Agency (US) Cultural Literacy. If the student has already taken a Social Science Colloquium, this course will fulfill an Elective Colloquium and US Cultural Literacy.

Calderwood Seminars in Public Writing are advanced-level, writing-intensive courses that engage students in a review of areas of special interest. These seminars emphasize public writing—the ability to translate complex arguments and professional jargon to a broad audience Read more 


 

HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus, Fall 2021 - Gallagher

Professor: Daphne Gallagher

2.00 credits

• CRN 12972: Monday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 102

• CRN 12973: Tuesday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 102

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application at http://forms.uoregon.edu.  (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password.), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more


 

HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus, Fall 2021 - Graboyes

Professor: Melissa Graboyes

2.00 credits

• CRN 12974: Friday, 10:00-11:50 @ CHA 102

• CRN 12975: Friday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 102

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application at http://forms.uoregon.edu.  (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password.), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more


 

HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus, Fall 2021 - Mossberg

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

2.00 credits

• CRN 12977: Wednesday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 101

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application at http://forms.uoregon.edu.  (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password.), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more


 

HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus, Fall 2021 - Jacobsen

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

2.00 credits

• CRN 16735: Thursday, 12:00-13:50 @ CHA 102

• CRN 17149: Wednesday, 14:00-15:50 @ CHA 102

HC 477H Thesis Prospectus requires preauthorization before each term and entails a completed online form Thesis Prospectus Application at http://forms.uoregon.edu.  (Note: All users need to log in before using forms with electronic signature enabled. Users with a UO ID will log in with their DuckID and password.), with a one-page outline of your thesis idea and a one-page bibliography attached. Read more