Spring 2018 Course Descriptions

Spring 2018 HC 207H: Ecological Thought and Practice

Professor: Gabriel Yospin

4 credits

•  CRN 32526: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 201
•  Required Lab: Friday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ LIB 41

Ecology is the study of organisms and their environment; it is the study of us and our oikos, our home. Our own bodies house an ecosystem of microbes that fluctuate with and influence our health. And on a large scale, environmental pollution and global climate change are products of ecological interactions. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 207H: 21st Century Science

Professor: James Schombert

4 credits

•  CRN 36787: Monday & Wednesday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 301
•  Required Lab: Friday, 09:00 - 10:50 @ WIL 13

During this last century, our description of Nature has shifted from a static Cartesian-Newtonian view of a clockwork Universe to an expanding Universe ruled by chaos and complexity. This course will explore topics in three divisions of Nature; the macroscopic world, microscopic world, and cosmology. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 209H: Natural Hazards and Disasters and their Social Impact

Professor: Ilya Bindeman and Elena Bogolyubova

4 credits

•  CRN 32528: Monday & Wednesday, 14:30 - 15:50 @ CHI 128

This course will be a crossroad between environmental and social sciences and will be co-taught by two instructors from Geological Science and International Studies. We will explore physical and geological aspects of natural disasters, such as volcanic eruption, tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes and typhoons with many examples around the globe, crossing countries of different economic levels of development. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 209H: The Cryosphere: Ice’s Role in the Earth System

Professor: Dave Sutherland

4 credits

•  CRN 36287: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ GSH 103

The general public is faced daily with images from the cryosphere, whether it is a polar bear floating on a sea ice floe, to a tidewater glacier calving off enormous chunks of ice. Yet, the science behind the headlines and gripping images is less well-explored, and certainly, less well-understood by most people. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 223H: Radical West: The Culture and Politics of the American West during the Sixties and Seventies

Professor: Casey Shoop

4 credits

•  CRN 32531: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201
•  CRN 32535: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 301

From the Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley to the rise of Reaganism in Orange County, from the Black Panthers in the East Bay to the growth of tech libertarianism in Silicon Valley, the West Coast becomes the unique site of historical conjuncture and contestation during the 1960s. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 223H: The Graphic Novel

Professor: Helen Southworth

4 credits

•  CRN 32533: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301
•  CRN 32532: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 301

In this class we will explore the evolution of the graphic novel genre (or sequential art), its subject matter and its form. We’ll consider visual storytelling and we’ll learn strategies for visual and textual analysis. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 223H: Artificial Births in Speculative Fiction from Frankenstein to the Present

Professor: Elizabeth Raisanen

4 credits

•  CRN 32534: Wednesday & Friday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202

Ever since the 1818 publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, artificial births have been a recurring plot point in many works of speculative fiction. Heralded by many as the first science fiction novel, Frankenstein explores a theme that subsequent authors have engaged with in order to call into question the very categories of the “natural” and the “artificial” when it comes to reproduction. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 223H: Reading Spaces

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

4 credits

•  CRN 32536: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

This course explores literature of the city since the early nineteenth century. It examines questions of race, power and space in the representations of the individual and the crowd, highlighting the role of the urban observer. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 233H: Gender & Sexuality in US History

Professor: Tim Williams

4 credits

•  CRN 32537: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202
•  CRN 32538: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202

This is a course in historical methods and research, focusing specifically on the history of gender and sexuality in the United States from its establishment through the twentieth century. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 233H: Dead Media

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

4 credits

•  CRN 32540: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ MCK 473

This course develops foundational techniques in research in the humanities and social sciences through an exploration of the history of media from the invention of writing to virtual reality. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 233H: Alchemy and Magic

Professor: Vera Keller

4 credits

•  CRN 32541: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 301

This course will suggest approaches to the study of alchemy and magic in Europe and the Atlantic world from 1400 to 1700, including studies of material culture, matter theory, secrecy, ritual, and gender and science. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 233H: The American City

Professor: Ocean Howell

4 credits

•  CRN 36270: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201
•  CRN 36271: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201

In the postbellum (post-Civil War) era, the cities of the United States provided the world with a number of firsts, including the first skyscraper and the first settlement to reach a population of 10 million. At various points, American cities have been the largest, the tallest, the densest, and the wealthiest on the planet. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 399H: Critical Argumentation and Scholarship

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4 credits

•  CRN 36286: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101

Students learn how to articulate their academic work with confidence. Students tasked with presenting their own work in other classes or preparing to defend honors college theses will have the opportunity to apply course concepts to perfect their own presentations. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: tba

1 credit

•  CRN 32546: Saturday 4/14, 11:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 201
•  CRN 32547: Thursday 4/19, 17:00 - 21:50 @ ANS 192
•  CRN 32548: Saturday 4/21, 11:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 201

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. Students are encouraged to take this course late in the second year or early in the third year. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 421H: “War and Peace and Totality and Infinity: Tolstoy and Levinas”

Professor: Steven Shankman

4 credits

•  CRN 32551: Thursday, 18:00 - 20:50 @ Oregon State Penitentiary Salem

This course is part of the Inside Out Prison Exchange Program, and open only to CHC students. Half the students (“inside” students) are prison inmates and the other half are University of Oregon students (“outside” students). This is a two-quarter sequence. All students who sign up for winter quarter will be expected to register for spring quarter as well. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 421H: Color Autobiography

Professor: Esther Hagenlocher

4 credits

•  CRN 32552: Monday & Wednesday, 08:00 - 09:50 @ LAWRENCE 279

This course borrows its title from environmental autobiography, an approach employed in the field of science which introduced environmental thinking and encouraged us to look at and understand our own experiences and to formulate preferences and meanings. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 421H: Literature and Photography

Professor: Martin Klebes

4 credits

•  CRN 36289: Wednesday & Friday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202

This colloquium is devoted to examining texts at the intersection of letters and images in the 20th and early 21st century across German, French, Italian, and American modernist traditions. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 424H/421H: Prevention of Mass Atrocity

Professor: David Frank

4 credits

•  CRN 36251: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 301

This course is dedicated to the tragedies of mass atrocity and genocide. We will consider approaches designed to inoculate against mass atrocities and genocide and the strategic strategies available to confront mass atrocity or genocide breakout. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 434H/421H: Representing the Holocaust

Professor: Monique Balbuena

4 credits

•  CRN 32558: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 201

The Holocaust defies human comprehension and logic, and challenges language’s expressive powers. Indeed, the extension of its horror cannot be fully expressed or transmitted, and yet, it must be. But how to represent it? How to say the unspeakable? Read more


Spring 2018 HC 434H/421H: Revolution and Exile in the 18th-century Atlantic: France, USA, and Haiti

Professor: Gordon Sayre

4 credits

•  CRN 32559: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202

The American and French Revolutions established our modern political ideologies of nationalism, freedom, equality, toleration and human rights. For those who lived through these revolutions, however, they were not always a matter of noble principles, but a horrifying ordeal of fear and violence. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 431H: Experiment

Professor: Vera Keller

4 credits

•  CRN 32554: Wednesday, 14:00 - 16:50 @ CHA 201

Science (scientia) once meant knowledge proven by sure reasoning, as distinguished from mere opinion based upon fallible human senses. How, then, did the human manipulation and observation of nature come to be regarded as a source of dependable knowledge? Read more


Spring 2018 HC 431H: Digital Scholarship

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4 credits

•  CRN 32555: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 202

New technologies and techniques are fundamentally changing scholarly practices and students not engaging important questions raised by these developments are not prepared for the academic landscapes ahead. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 431H: Search

Professor: Daniel Rosenberg

4 credits

•  CRN 32557: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ GSH 103

The purpose of this course is to gain theoretical, historical, and practical insight into the influence of search practices and technologies on our everyday epistemology. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 434H/431H: Climate and Culture from the Arctic to the Andes

Professor: Mark Carey

4 credits

•  CRN 36275: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301

Climate change is not just about temperature and weather; nor is it only about the present and future. Indigenous people in particular are disproportionately affected by climate change and natural disasters, yet they are often marginalized from policy and academic discussions. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 444H/431H: The Long Decade: The 1960s, from Elvis to The Last Waltz

Professor: Stephen Rabe

4 credits

•  CRN 32563: Tuesday, 14:00 - 16:50 @ GSH 130

This multidisciplinary course defines "the 1960s" as the period from the mid-1950s (Elvis, the Montgomery Bus Boycott) to the mid-1970s (the fall of Richard Nixon, The Band's "Last Waltz" Concert). This is a period of intense political, social, and cultural change in US society. As such, we will be examining the various movements: civil rights, youth, countercultural, feminist, and anti-war. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 441H: Bioinspired Design

Professor: Kelly Sutherland

4 credits

•  CRN 32560: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 202

Over the course of 3.8 billion years, through the process of evolution, organisms have “invented” solutions to deal with complex problems in the natural world. In this course, we explore basic biological and physical principles to understand how nature has solved these problems and others. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 441H: Bread 101

Professor: Elly Vandegrift, Karen Guillemin, and Judith Eisen

4 credits

•  CRN 32561: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ GSH 130

Bread is a complex medium, looking nothing like the original seed of grain from which it originates. Yet when we mix a few simple ingredients we are able to induce a transformation that results in an edible, highly nourishing, staple food product crucial for sustenance in many cultures. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 441H: Neuroscience Perspectives on Drug Policy

Professor: Christina Karns

4 credits

•  CRN 32562: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ GSH 103

Check the headlines: Opiate abuse epidemic. High rates of stimulant use by college students. Marijuana legalization. Privatized prisons and non-violent drug offenders. Wherever you fall on the spectrum of abstinence to addiction, these issues affect you and the people you know. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 441H: Geology and Biology of the Tibetan Plateau

Professor: Samantha Hopkins

4 credits

•  CRN 36751: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 301

Central Asia is home to the highest mountains in the world, and the elevation and relief of the Tibetan Plateau is unequalled anywhere else on Earth. Its impact on global climate traces back perhaps 65 million years, and continues through the present day. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 444H/441H: Science Education in Remote Locations

Professor: Kenneth Doxsee

4 credits

•  CRN 36285: Monday & Wednesday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 201

Teaching science without experimentation is like trying to teach weight-lifting without actually lifting weights. Unfortunately, financial limitations can limit access to experimental science in even the wealthiest of communities. In this colloquium, we will carry out the initial stages of planning for the development of experimental science education content, designed for introduction to schools in targeted remote and/or rural locations. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Mark Carey 

2 credits

•  CRN 32565: Thursday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101
•  CRN 32564: Friday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 101

This class guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more


Spring 2018 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

2 credits

•  CRN 32566: Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 101

This class guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more