Fall 2019 Course Descriptions

Fall 2019 HC 207H: Monsters and Machine Learning

Professor: Stephen Fickas

4.00 credits

• CRN 12740: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 – 11:20 @ LIB 41
Lab:             Friday, 10:00 – 11:20 @ LIB 41

This course will explore monsters of the past, monsters of the present and monsters of the future. For monsters of the past, we will focus on gothic novels and works by Poe, Lovecraft and Shelley. For monsters of the present, we will look at Internet trolls. For monsters of the future, Read More


Fall 2019 HC 209H: The Science of Learning & Memory

Professor: Nicole Dudukovic Kuhl

4.00 credits

• CRN 12742: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ ESL 112

Our memories shape our identities and give meaning to our lives, yet they are not always as reliable as we would like.  In this course, we will explore the successes and failures of our memories by examining key concepts, theories, and methodological approaches for studying human learning and memory. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 209H/PHYS 199: Science as Discovery

Professor: Greg Bothun

4.00 credits

• CRN 16499: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 – 17:50 @ B040 PSC

This course will fulfill HC 209H Science and is open to Clark Honors College students only.
Science is a discovery process that is largely driven by measurements, observations and guessing. The class will be high in activity-based learning as the goal is for students to duplicate the scientific process via various forms of relevant measurement. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Apocalyptic Visions

Professor: Brendan O'Kelly

4.00 credits

• CRN 17289: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ DEA 303
• CRN 17290: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ DEA 209

Why and how have humans attempted to think the “end of days”? What does the human fixation on the apocalypse, tracing its Greek root, “uncover” or “disclose” about the world and our engagement with it? Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Cinematic Representations of the Ancient and Pre-Modern World

Professor: Stephen Rust

4.00 credits

• CRN 12756: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CON 301
• CRN 17242: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ GSH 130

Motion pictures are a decidedly modern invention; however, as with all forms of art many filmmakers have used this modern technology to imagine and re-imagine the lives of ancient peoples. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: The Song, the Book, and the Bandersnatch: Interactive Stories from Homer to Netflix

Professor: David Chamberlain

4.00 credits

• CRN 12747: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301
• CRN 17249: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ VIL 201

This seminar will explore ideas of reader interaction and the reader as creator or controller of the story in western narrative from ancient Greece to the present day. The oldest Greek narratives were crafted as oral performances, which drew from a vast repertoire of pre-coded choices, according to the desires of both poet and audience. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Feminist Epic

Professor: Anna Carroll

4.00 credits

• CRN 12743: Wednesday & Friday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ FEN 119

This class will survey women’s literary renderings of Homer. Selections from recent women-penned translations of The Iliad and The Odyssey, prize-winning novels, contemporary poetry, and an indie folk album are the rich tapestry against which we'll think about how feminism has to work to reshape some of the most violent and foundational stories in all of literature. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Explore—Encounter—Exploit: Mediating Ancient and Modern Contact Zones

Professor: Marcel Brousseau

4.00 credits

•  CRN 12746: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CON 203

Orbis novus (new world) and terra nova (new land) were among the Latin terms used to name the places European explorers encountered in the early modern era. These terms revealed more about the antiquated cultural expectations surrounding oceanic exploration than they did about the lands they described. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Drama in Ancient Greece and Medieval Japan

Professor: Corinne Bayerl

4.00 credits

• CRN 12744: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30 - 9:50 @ CHA 202
• CRN 12758: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 201
• CRN 12754: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 201

This seminar will explore the relationship between drama in comic and tragic modes in two different cultures: 5th- and 4th-century B.C. Athens and 14th-century Japan. Our main goal is to understand why the separation of drama into a serious and a lighthearted genre occurred in the first place, why playwrights in both cultures settled on one or the other, and why they did not mix both genres to create a hybrid form, such as tragicomedy, which is of later historical origin. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Ethical Beginnings: On the Origins of Ethical Philosophy around the World

Professor: Caroline Lundquist

4.00 credits

• CRN 12745: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ GSH 103
• CRN 12755: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CON 301

As philosophers have often pointed out, sometimes the things that are most obvious to us are also the hardest to explain. This is true of some of our most important beliefs about ethics, including beliefs about personal responsibility, judgment, and even what it means to be human. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: The Tragic Mode of Knowledge

Professor: Casey Shoop

4.00 credits

• CRN 12748: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 201
• CRN 12753: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 201

How can it be that seeing the pain of others constitutes a form of knowledge? What does it mean, in the words of Gloucester in King Lear, to “see it feelingly”?  From Aristotle to the present, tragedy is an aesthetic form that seeks to pose, interrogate and answer this question of what we learn from the dramatization of human suffering. Read more

Fall 2019 HC 221H: Thinking Like the Sun: Travel in Ancient and Emergent Minds

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 12749: Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 201

“I cannot rest from travel/I will drink life to the lees”—Tennyson, “Ulysses”
Ahoy, armchair travelers! People did not always have access to planes to jet across the world, or satellite imagery in which to gaze at our earth whole. For most of human history earth was traversed laboriously on foot, or by donkey or camel, or by dug-out canoe, or home-made raft: travel was arduous, and people did not go far. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Epic and Leadership

Professor: Barbara Mossberg

4.00 credits

• CRN 12751: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 201

Into the woods, on the wine dark seas, following the yellow brick road-- witches and monsters and tempters are at every bend and even in the mirror as we make our way forward: our course explores the power of story to illuminate our lives as a momentous learning journey critical for the role you will play in our world. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 221H: Mythos & Ethos I: Stories & Ethics from the Cradle of Civilization

Professor: Kimberley Parzuchowski

4.00 credits

• CRN 12750: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CON 104
• CRN 12757: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 301
• CRN 12752: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ TYKE 240

Human life is fraught with confusion and the anguish that we must chose to act and then live with the consequences of those actions. “How shall I live?” is an ancient question. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Oral Advocacy and Argumentation

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

• CRN 17332: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ GSH 130

Rhetoric and argument have been the foundation of a liberal education for more than 2000 years. Drawing on pre-modern thinkers, in particular from ancient Greece, this course helps students engage in more effective oral advocacy and argument. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Muslim Women of the Early Islamic History

Professor: Irum Shiekh

4.00 credits

• CRN 17203: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ STB 253
• CRN 17205: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ STB 253

In this class, we will learn about the lived experiences of diverse Muslim women of the Middle East, South Asia, Africa, Europe, and South East Asia and contextualize their narratives within the existing sociohistorical, cultural, and religious practices across the globe that intermingled with Islam to shape their lives and identities. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Global Food Security

Professor: Galen Martin

4.00 credits

• CRN 12762: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 201

A fundamental challenge for humans has always been the procurement of food. The human historical human experience has been marked by periodic localized and regional famine.. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Mental Illness in Ancient Cultures

Professor: Shoshana Kerewsky

4.00 credits

• CRN 12759: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30 - 9:50 @ GSH 103
• CRN 12763: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 301

This course explores a range of classical civilizations’ descriptions of mental health and mental illness, their physical and supernatural/religious explanations for emotional and behavioral deviance, and how people with non-normative experiences were treated by their communities. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Environment Alteration before Fossil Fuels

Professor: Nick Kohler

4.00 credits

• CRN 17204: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ 131 Global Scholars Hall (131 GSH) 

The class traces the direct and indirect impact of humans on environments throughout the globe. Historically, it ranges from the time period of human expansion out of the African continent (by at least 70,000 years ago) to the pervasive effects of global trade in the 1700s. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Unearthing Medieval West Africa

Professor: Daphne Gallagher

4.00 credits

• CRN 12761: Wednesday & Friday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202

Despite its cosmopolitan cities, extensive commercial systems, and extraordinary wealth, West Africa has been largely ignored in discussions of the global medieval world. In this class, we will focus on how archaeological excavations are expanding scholarly understandings of this understudied region. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Women, Gender and Sexuality in the West to 1500

Professor: Emily Gilkey

4.00 credits

• CRN 12764: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202
• CRN 12766: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 202

This course is a survey of civilization and culture to 1500 using the lens of gender to illuminate key historical themes.  In addition to providing an overview of ancient history in the West, the class will also help students to think critically about how the story of the West has been told. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Crossing the Pamir Mountains: A Silk Roads History

Professor: Roxann Prazniak

4.00 credits

• CRN 12767: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202
• CRN 12768: Tuesday & Thursday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 202

This course is not about mountaineering, but if you have done any backpacking or climbed Spencer Butte you will have a feel for the travel experiences of those who traversed the Eurasian continent in centuries past. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: The History of History

Professor: Timothy Williams

4.00 credits

CRN 12765: Monday & Wednesday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ MCK 473

CRN 12769: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 201

Premodern peoples from the Ancient Greeks and Romans to early Christians to Mayas all thought about, recorded, and wrote history. This course explores historical knowledge in these and other pre-modern civilizations. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 231H: Citizenship and Belonging

Professor: Noah Eber-Schmid

4.00 credits

• CRN 12760: Wednesday & Friday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 202

Over the past decade a variety of charged political issues and developments have placed questions about citizenship at the center of public conversations in the United States. Sharp disagreements over the construction of a southern border wall, undocumented immigration, asylum policies, refugee resettlement, voter ID requirements, welfare reform, and national security have highlighted questions about who is and is not an American citizen, who can become an American citizen, and the status of those that live in the United States but are not citizens. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 421H: Commonplace Reading, or, Book Love

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

4.00 credits

•  CRN 12778: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ CHA 202

In this course, we will explore the connections between reading and writing in the world of commonplace books from the seventeenth to twentieth centuries, books in which readers created their own personal anthologies, with passages, images, and other artifacts important to them. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 421H: Virginia Woolf

Professor: Helen Southworth

4.00 credits

•  CRN 16599: Wednesday, 14:00 - 16:50 @ FR 217

This class is focused on the life and work of English writer Virginia Woolf (1882-1941).  Texts will include To the Lighthouse, Orlando, A Room of One's Own, Roger Fry: A Biography, Flush and The Waves.   We'll use our focus on Virginia Woolf to consider the range of approaches and research methodologies available when studying a single author and a single oeuvre.  Topics will include biography and book art. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 421H: Reading New Religions

Professor: Anne Kreps

4.00 credits

•  CRN 16649: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:20 @ FR 225

The Bible is the most widely read book in America.  On one hand, it is a collection of old texts, written for the inhabitants of the ancient Near East. On the other hand, it is the foundational book for religions both old and new. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 421H: Cinema Manifestos and Movements

Professor: Peter Alilunas

4.00 credits

•  CRN 16654: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 201

This course traces in detail the various manifestos from the global history of cinema, positioning them within historical, aesthetic, political, and theoretical contexts. This course takes a broad approach, with a wide net to collect the efforts to shape—and often contain—what cinema could and should become. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 421H: Touching Research: Adventures in the Archives

Professor: Judith Raiskin

4.00 Credits

• CRN 12777: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00-11:50 @ LIB 201 Special Collections Classroom

Research should be an immersive experience involving body, mind and spirit. This course will involve hands-on research projects in the University of Oregon Archives and Special Collections.  Students will learn the methods of archival research, examining artifacts from three different collections: the Rajneesh Collection, the James Tiptree, Jr. Collection, and the Southern Oregon Country Lesbian Archival Project. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 431H: The Language of Truth

Professor: Eric Pederson

4.00 credits

•  CRN 17111: Monday & Wednesday, 16:00 - 17:50 @ CHA 301

How do know when someone is telling the truth? How do we indicate when we are or are not telling the truth? How do languages vary in their expression of truth statements? These questions have always been relevant to the human condition. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 431H: Research Treasures: Navigating Knowledge

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

4.00 credits

•  CRN 12782: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ GSH 103

Navigating the accumulated body of scholarly knowledge, understanding how such knowledge is produced, apprehending the properties that distinguish it, and participating in the changing landscape of research and scholarship are crucial to academic success. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 431H: Big Problems and Bold Solutions: A Collaborative Approach to Problem Solving and Developing Leadership Skills

Professor: Jim Shephard

4.00 credits

•  CRN 12784: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 202

Whatever career you embark on, whatever path you follow, you will find success if you are an effective problem solver and leader. This course will give you an opportunity to develop problem solving and leadership skills in a collaborative environment. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 431H: Environmental and Science Communication in the Age of Wildfires in the West

Professor: Hollie Smith

4.00 credits

•  CRN 16675: Friday, 09:00 - 11:50 @ CHA 301

In this course, students will be asked to combine storytelling techniques with scientific research in an effort to develop communication that seeks to both inform the public about the growing problem of wildfire in the state and explore models for engaging the public in both the storytelling and the science of fire. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 431H: Secrecy

Professor: Michael Moffitt

4.00 credits

•  CRN 17000: Monday & Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:20 @ CHA 301

Under what conditions can we—or should we be able to—learn that which others wish to keep secret? This colloquium will introduce the complex, overlapping policy assumptions and tradeoffs associated with questions of secrecy. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 434H/431H: Biography as History: Analyzing African Political Leadership since the 1950s

Professor: A.B. Assensoh

4.00 credits

•  CRN 17110: Tuesday & Thursday, 14:00 - 15:50 @ CHA 301

African political leadership is one of the least understood historical-cum-political phenomena. On the one hand, several of the continent’s political leaders are often romanticized as titans without flaws and, on the other hand, they are often unfairly demonized as the culprits for most of the issues that undermine the continent. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 434H/431H: Social Justice and Human Rights

Professor: Cheyney Ryan

4.00 credits

•  CRN 17079: Tuesday, 14:00 - 16:50 @ MCK 240B

We will explore the history and practice of human rights today, and their role in today's political struggles for a better world. Our focus will be both theoretical and practical: we will explore the philosophical underpinnings of human rights, as they emerged from the 20th century experience of war; and we will look at specific conflicts where they now play a role, focusing initially on conflicts around war, genocide, and economic justice. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 441H: The Biological Basis of Coalitions, Alliances, and Political Systems

Professor: Klaree Boose

4.00 credits

•  CRN 12786: Tuesday & Thursday, 08:30 - 09:50 @ CHA 301

Human sociality is complex and our proclivity to form coalitions and alliances has a long evolutionary history. Understanding the biological basis of human political behavior is relevant to a wide range of disciplines including business, marketing, economics, and political science. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 441H: Neuroscience Perspectives on Drug Policy

Professor: Christina Karns

4.00 credits

•  CRN 16657: Tuesday & Thursday, 16:00 - 17:20 @ CHA 301

Check the headlines: Opiate abuse epidemic. High rates of stimulant use by college students. Marijuana legalization. Privatized prisons and non-violent drug offenders. Wherever you fall on the spectrum of abstinence to addiction, these issues affect you and the people you know. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 441H: Scientific Windows on the Blossoming of Cognition in Mind and Brain

Professor: Dare Baldwin

4.00 credits

•  CRN 12785:  Monday & Wednesday, 10:00 - 11:20 @ CHA 301

Children’s grasp of the world changes dramatically with development. In the brief two years from birth, they alter from helpless bundles into walking, talking dynamos. The course of cognitive development is also in some ways paradoxical. As toddlers, children acquire new knowledge at a remarkable pace, but at the same time they are prone to a degree of thoughtlessness that would lead them into imminent danger Read more


Fall 2019 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: TBA

1.00 credit

•  CRN 12774: Saturday 10/12 only, 11:00 - 15:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 408H: Thesis Orientation

Professor: Monique Balbuena

1.00 credit

•  CRN 12775: Thursday 10/10 only, 17:00 - 21:50 @ GSH 103

This is a one-day workshop with follow-up meetings. It should be taken late in the second year or early in the third year of attendance. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: David Frank

2.00 credits

•  CRN 12789: Monday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101
•  CRN 12790: Tuesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101

•  CRN 17279: Wednesday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Trond Jacobsen

2.00 credits

•  CRN 12791: Friday, 09:00 - 10:50 @ CHA 101
•  CRN 12794: Thursday, 16:00 - 17:50 @ CHA 101

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more


Fall 2019 HC 477H: Thesis Prospectus

Professor: Mai-Lin Cheng

2.00 credits

•  CRN 12792: Friday, 12:00 - 13:50 @ CHA 101

Thesis Prospectus (2 credits) guides student work with a primary thesis advisor to develop a prospectus and timeline for thesis work throughout the year. Read more