Events

Jan 24
Aleph Earth12:00 a.m.

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal...
November 17 2021–February 20 2022
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal quartet New York Polyphony that merges art, music, and technology. In this 12-minutes audiovisual piece, New York Polyphony’s world premiere recording of Spanish Renaissance composer Francisco de Peñalosa’s Lamentationes Jeremiae Feria V (BIS Records, 2019) is paired with imagery generated by an artificial intelligence model that AICP trained to respond to patterns in video of the natural world (including clouds, lava pillars in Iceland, bush fires in Australia, icebergs in Greenland, and Oregon’s Clear Lake) and the complex interplay of the quartet’s voices. Combined, the art and music express both the emotional weight of Lamentationes—a setting of the Prophet Jeremiah’s lamentations on human suffering—and the staggering urgency of our global climate crisis. For more information about this project, visit http://colinives.com/aleph_earth/about-5/

JSMA’s presentation of Aleph Earth is made possible by UO faculty and project partners Colin Ives (Associate Professor, School of Art + Design and Director, AICP) and Craig Phillips (Assistant Professor, School of Music and Dance and Bass, New York Polyphony). New work by Ives, AI Flower Arranging: variations 1, 2, and 3 will be exhibited concurrently with Aleph Earth

Outdoor Premiere of Aleph Earth
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 @ JSMA North Lawn. 
Aleph Earth  will be presented on a continuous loop for one hour on the JSMA’s north lawn. Please dress for the weather. In the event of extraordinarily inclement conditions, an announcement about program cancellation will be shared on JSMA’s website and social media no later than 5:00pm on the day of the event, and the program will be rescheduled for a future date. More information here

Jan 24
Braiding Sweetgrass Pop Up Events12:00 a.m.

Join units across campus as they host a variety of pop up events throughout the month of January. The events will celebrate and explore themes in Robin Wall Kimmerer's...
January 12–31

Join units across campus as they host a variety of pop up events throughout the month of January. The events will celebrate and explore themes in Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass. Pick up a physical copy of the book at no cost! Visit the linked website to see a calendar of events.

Jan 24
Special Monday Hours10:00 a.m.

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be open with FREE admission in honor of Robin Wall Kimmerer's visit to the University of Oregon, in association...
January 24 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

The Museum of Natural and Cultural History will be open with FREE admission in honor of Robin Wall Kimmerer's visit to the University of Oregon, in association with her book, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.

Jan 24
Live Stream of Author's Talk with Robin Wall Kimmerernoon

UPDATE: In keeping with the state of Oregon's health and safety recommendations, we have canceled the in-person gathering to view Robin Wall Kimmerer's live streamed...
January 24 noon
Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Galleria

UPDATE: In keeping with the state of Oregon's health and safety recommendations, we have canceled the in-person gathering to view Robin Wall Kimmerer's live streamed talk. But, that doesn't mean you still can't watch! Register to watch the live stream from your own device.

 

Join a live stream of author Robin Wall Kimmerer's talk on Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a citizen of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces plants and animals as our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowledge together through her memoir of living in the natural world and practicing heart-centered science.

Drawing on her life as an Indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world.

The museum will still be open with free admission on Monday, January 24, in honor of Robin Wall Kimmerer.

Jan 25
Aleph Earth12:00 a.m.

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal...
November 17 2021–February 20 2022
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal quartet New York Polyphony that merges art, music, and technology. In this 12-minutes audiovisual piece, New York Polyphony’s world premiere recording of Spanish Renaissance composer Francisco de Peñalosa’s Lamentationes Jeremiae Feria V (BIS Records, 2019) is paired with imagery generated by an artificial intelligence model that AICP trained to respond to patterns in video of the natural world (including clouds, lava pillars in Iceland, bush fires in Australia, icebergs in Greenland, and Oregon’s Clear Lake) and the complex interplay of the quartet’s voices. Combined, the art and music express both the emotional weight of Lamentationes—a setting of the Prophet Jeremiah’s lamentations on human suffering—and the staggering urgency of our global climate crisis. For more information about this project, visit http://colinives.com/aleph_earth/about-5/

JSMA’s presentation of Aleph Earth is made possible by UO faculty and project partners Colin Ives (Associate Professor, School of Art + Design and Director, AICP) and Craig Phillips (Assistant Professor, School of Music and Dance and Bass, New York Polyphony). New work by Ives, AI Flower Arranging: variations 1, 2, and 3 will be exhibited concurrently with Aleph Earth

Outdoor Premiere of Aleph Earth
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 @ JSMA North Lawn. 
Aleph Earth  will be presented on a continuous loop for one hour on the JSMA’s north lawn. Please dress for the weather. In the event of extraordinarily inclement conditions, an announcement about program cancellation will be shared on JSMA’s website and social media no later than 5:00pm on the day of the event, and the program will be rescheduled for a future date. More information here

Jan 25
Braiding Sweetgrass Pop Up Events12:00 a.m.

Join units across campus as they host a variety of pop up events throughout the month of January. The events will celebrate and explore themes in Robin Wall Kimmerer's...
January 12–31

Join units across campus as they host a variety of pop up events throughout the month of January. The events will celebrate and explore themes in Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass. Pick up a physical copy of the book at no cost! Visit the linked website to see a calendar of events.

Jan 26
2021-22 Common Seeing: Meeting Points12:00 a.m.

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common...
October 14 2021–April 10 2022

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common Seeing expands this conversation through the visual arts.

The 2021-22 selection, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer, addresses humanity’s responsibility to the natural world through its author’s observations as an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, academically trained botanist, and mother. Kimmerer calls for a reciprocal relationship between people and nature that prioritizes generosity and respects the needs of all living things. Her memoir’s interwoven topics include ecology, parenting, Indigenous land and water rights, traditional foodways, good citizenship, sustainability, climate change, and the preservation of language.

This year’s Common Seeing brings together works by nine contemporary Native artists that speak to these issues and each’s experiences as individuals and members of their communities. Featured artists include Natalie Ball (American, Black, Modoc and Klamath), Joe Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes), Bud Lane (Siletz), Joey Lavadour (Walla Walla/Métis), Brenda Mallory (Cherokee), Lillian Pitt (Warm Springs, Wasco, and Yakama), Gail Tremblay (Mi'kmaq and Onondaga), Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), and Shirod Younker (Coquille, Coos, and Umpqua, b. 1972). JSMA is especially grateful to the Museum of Natural and Cultural History for lending work from their collection. 

For more information about the UO’s Common Reading and to find out how members of the UO Community can access a digital copy of Braiding Sweetgrass, visit https://fyp.uoregon.edu/common-reading-2021-2022-braiding-sweetgrass.

 

The JSMA is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people. Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon. Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world. In following the Indigenous protocol of acknowledging the original people of the land we occupy, we also extend our respect to the nine federally recognized Indigenous nations of Oregon: the Burns Paiute Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Coquille Indian Tribe, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, and the Klamath Tribes. We express our respect to the many more tribes who have ancestral connections to this territory, as well as to all other displaced Indigenous peoples who call Oregon home.

 

Gail Tremblay (American, Mi'kmaq, and Onondaga, b. 1945), 2018. 1981 Film Irony: Trying to Have an American Film in Cheyenne Native Language Judged in the Foreign Film Category for the Oscars (Even the Academy Rejected the Proposal), 2018. 35mm film (from “Windwalker," 1981), red and white film leader, silver braid 24 x 14 x 14 in. Museum Purchase through the Edna Pearl Horton Memorial Endowment. (Image courtesy of the Artist and Froelick Gallery; photography by Mario Gallucci.)

Jan 26
Aleph Earth12:00 a.m.

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal...
November 17 2021–February 20 2022
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal quartet New York Polyphony that merges art, music, and technology. In this 12-minutes audiovisual piece, New York Polyphony’s world premiere recording of Spanish Renaissance composer Francisco de Peñalosa’s Lamentationes Jeremiae Feria V (BIS Records, 2019) is paired with imagery generated by an artificial intelligence model that AICP trained to respond to patterns in video of the natural world (including clouds, lava pillars in Iceland, bush fires in Australia, icebergs in Greenland, and Oregon’s Clear Lake) and the complex interplay of the quartet’s voices. Combined, the art and music express both the emotional weight of Lamentationes—a setting of the Prophet Jeremiah’s lamentations on human suffering—and the staggering urgency of our global climate crisis. For more information about this project, visit http://colinives.com/aleph_earth/about-5/

JSMA’s presentation of Aleph Earth is made possible by UO faculty and project partners Colin Ives (Associate Professor, School of Art + Design and Director, AICP) and Craig Phillips (Assistant Professor, School of Music and Dance and Bass, New York Polyphony). New work by Ives, AI Flower Arranging: variations 1, 2, and 3 will be exhibited concurrently with Aleph Earth

Outdoor Premiere of Aleph Earth
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 @ JSMA North Lawn. 
Aleph Earth  will be presented on a continuous loop for one hour on the JSMA’s north lawn. Please dress for the weather. In the event of extraordinarily inclement conditions, an announcement about program cancellation will be shared on JSMA’s website and social media no later than 5:00pm on the day of the event, and the program will be rescheduled for a future date. More information here

Jan 26
Braiding Sweetgrass Pop Up Events12:00 a.m.

Join units across campus as they host a variety of pop up events throughout the month of January. The events will celebrate and explore themes in Robin Wall Kimmerer's...
January 12–31

Join units across campus as they host a variety of pop up events throughout the month of January. The events will celebrate and explore themes in Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass. Pick up a physical copy of the book at no cost! Visit the linked website to see a calendar of events.

Jan 26
Explore Oregon10:00 a.m.

Experience the dynamic forces that shape Oregon’s landscapes, climate, and ecosystems. Meet giant salmon, Ice Age sloths, and other amazing animals from across the...
January 14–December 31
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Experience the dynamic forces that shape Oregon’s landscapes, climate, and ecosystems. Meet giant salmon, Ice Age sloths, and other amazing animals from across the millennia. Through interactive displays and rare specimens, you’ll go deep into Oregon’s past and join a conversation about our collective future.

Jan 26
Magic in Medieval Europe10:00 a.m.

Welcome to the world of medieval spirits and sorcery! Through spellbinding stories, objects, and imagery, MAGIC will take you to the roots of everyday superstitions and...
January 14–August 31
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Welcome to the world of medieval spirits and sorcery! Through spellbinding stories, objects, and imagery, MAGIC will take you to the roots of everyday superstitions and conjurings, delving deep into the phenomenon of magical thinking—past and present.

Jan 26
Oregon: Where Past Is Present10:00 a.m.

Delve into Oregon’s story, from the archaeology of the First Americans to the dynamic cultures of today’s Tribes. Combining interactive displays with world-class...
January 13–December 31
Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Delve into Oregon’s story, from the archaeology of the First Americans to the dynamic cultures of today’s Tribes.

Combining interactive displays with world-class anthropological collections, Oregon—Where Past is Present shares 14,000 years of Oregon stories, and invites you to tell your own. Explore the galleries, try your hand at ancient weaving styles, test your skills as an archaeologist, and much more.

Jan 26
Virtual Resume Writing Workshop1:00 p.m.

Need a quick Resume writing refresher? Come learn about the basics of resume writing and have the opportunity to ask questions on formatting, structure, your own resume,...
January 26 1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m.



Need a quick Resume writing refresher? Come learn about the basics of resume writing and have the opportunity to ask questions on formatting, structure, your own resume, and much more!  


Jan 27
2021-22 Common Seeing: Meeting Points12:00 a.m.

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common...
October 14 2021–April 10 2022

Every year, the University of Oregon’s Common Reading program encourages campus-wide engagement with a shared book and related resources. JSMA’s corresponding Common Seeing expands this conversation through the visual arts.

The 2021-22 selection, Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer, addresses humanity’s responsibility to the natural world through its author’s observations as an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, academically trained botanist, and mother. Kimmerer calls for a reciprocal relationship between people and nature that prioritizes generosity and respects the needs of all living things. Her memoir’s interwoven topics include ecology, parenting, Indigenous land and water rights, traditional foodways, good citizenship, sustainability, climate change, and the preservation of language.

This year’s Common Seeing brings together works by nine contemporary Native artists that speak to these issues and each’s experiences as individuals and members of their communities. Featured artists include Natalie Ball (American, Black, Modoc and Klamath), Joe Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes), Bud Lane (Siletz), Joey Lavadour (Walla Walla/Métis), Brenda Mallory (Cherokee), Lillian Pitt (Warm Springs, Wasco, and Yakama), Gail Tremblay (Mi'kmaq and Onondaga), Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), and Shirod Younker (Coquille, Coos, and Umpqua, b. 1972). JSMA is especially grateful to the Museum of Natural and Cultural History for lending work from their collection. 

For more information about the UO’s Common Reading and to find out how members of the UO Community can access a digital copy of Braiding Sweetgrass, visit https://fyp.uoregon.edu/common-reading-2021-2022-braiding-sweetgrass.

 

The JSMA is located on Kalapuya ilihi, the traditional indigenous homeland of the Kalapuya people. Following treaties between 1851 and 1855, Kalapuya people were dispossessed of their indigenous homeland by the United States government and forcibly removed to the Coast Reservation in Western Oregon. Today, Kalapuya descendants are primarily citizens of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, and they continue to make important contributions to their communities, to the UO, to Oregon, and to the world. In following the Indigenous protocol of acknowledging the original people of the land we occupy, we also extend our respect to the nine federally recognized Indigenous nations of Oregon: the Burns Paiute Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Coquille Indian Tribe, the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, and the Klamath Tribes. We express our respect to the many more tribes who have ancestral connections to this territory, as well as to all other displaced Indigenous peoples who call Oregon home.

 

Gail Tremblay (American, Mi'kmaq, and Onondaga, b. 1945), 2018. 1981 Film Irony: Trying to Have an American Film in Cheyenne Native Language Judged in the Foreign Film Category for the Oscars (Even the Academy Rejected the Proposal), 2018. 35mm film (from “Windwalker," 1981), red and white film leader, silver braid 24 x 14 x 14 in. Museum Purchase through the Edna Pearl Horton Memorial Endowment. (Image courtesy of the Artist and Froelick Gallery; photography by Mario Gallucci.)

Jan 27
Aleph Earth12:00 a.m.

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal...
November 17 2021–February 20 2022
Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA)

Aleph Earth is a groundbreaking collaboration between the UO’s Artificial Intelligence Creative Practice Research Group (AICP) and Grammy Award-nominated vocal quartet New York Polyphony that merges art, music, and technology. In this 12-minutes audiovisual piece, New York Polyphony’s world premiere recording of Spanish Renaissance composer Francisco de Peñalosa’s Lamentationes Jeremiae Feria V (BIS Records, 2019) is paired with imagery generated by an artificial intelligence model that AICP trained to respond to patterns in video of the natural world (including clouds, lava pillars in Iceland, bush fires in Australia, icebergs in Greenland, and Oregon’s Clear Lake) and the complex interplay of the quartet’s voices. Combined, the art and music express both the emotional weight of Lamentationes—a setting of the Prophet Jeremiah’s lamentations on human suffering—and the staggering urgency of our global climate crisis. For more information about this project, visit http://colinives.com/aleph_earth/about-5/

JSMA’s presentation of Aleph Earth is made possible by UO faculty and project partners Colin Ives (Associate Professor, School of Art + Design and Director, AICP) and Craig Phillips (Assistant Professor, School of Music and Dance and Bass, New York Polyphony). New work by Ives, AI Flower Arranging: variations 1, 2, and 3 will be exhibited concurrently with Aleph Earth

Outdoor Premiere of Aleph Earth
Wednesday, December 1, 2021 @ JSMA North Lawn. 
Aleph Earth  will be presented on a continuous loop for one hour on the JSMA’s north lawn. Please dress for the weather. In the event of extraordinarily inclement conditions, an announcement about program cancellation will be shared on JSMA’s website and social media no later than 5:00pm on the day of the event, and the program will be rescheduled for a future date. More information here