Events

Jan 18
Startup Weekend Eugene6:00 p.m.

Have a business or nonprofit idea you want to realize? Want to meet other entrepreneurially minded students and community members? Join us for Techstars Startup Weekend, an...
January 18 6:00 p.m.–12:00 a.m.
UO Innovation Hub

Have a business or nonprofit idea you want to realize? Want to meet other entrepreneurially minded students and community members?

Join us for Techstars Startup Weekend, an annual 3-day startup event where students and community members come together to develop a business or nonprofit in 54 hours. No prior entrepreneurial or business experience needed!

Sponsored by the Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship and RAIN Eugene, Techstars Startup Weekend Eugene is a full weekend-long experience. Your ticket includes:


7 full (and delicious) meals over the course of the weekend
Prizes for the top ideas/teams
One-on-one time with amazing mentors
A new network of developers, designers, and entrepreneurs eager, like you, to change the world.
All the internet and coffee you can consume.


Students can obtain a significantly reduced ticket by using the promotional code 'UODUCKS' and registering with their uoregon.edu email address (cost is $6 for entire weekend with this code).

For more information including obtaining a ticket, go to the Techstars Startup Weekend Eugene website. Or contact Kate Harmon, Undergraduate Program Manager, Lundquist Center for Entrepreneurship, at kharmon2@uoregon.edu.

Jan 30
Nalini Nadkarni: "Tapestry Thinking: Weaving the Threads of Humans and Nature"7:30 p.m.

Nalini Nadkarni, professor of Biology, University of Utah. Nalini Nadkarni will discuss how her experiences as a scientist precipitated her explorations into diverse ways of...
January 30 7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Straub Hall, 156

Nalini Nadkarni, professor of Biology, University of Utah.

Nalini Nadkarni will discuss how her experiences as a scientist precipitated her explorations into diverse ways of engaging humans with the natural world.  Her 35 years of ecological research in tropical and temperate rainforest canopies led to discoveries about the importance of treetop-dwelling plants in ecosystem processes, as well as the fragility of the rainforest tapestry. To help raise awareness of the need to protect forests and to narrow the increasing distance between humans and nature, Nadkarni created novel ways to synergistically share knowledge with a wide range of public audiences, including urban youth, visual artists, rap singers, policy-makers, and faith-based groups. She has also initiated and sustained programs to bring science lectures, conservation projects, and nature imagery to incarcerated men, women and youth in state prisons county jails, and juvenile detention centers, including those in Oregon. This interweaving of plants, animals, and people has helped to create a stronger tapestry of conservation and engagement with nature. 

Mar 12
Alisa Roth, author of Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness7:30 p.m.

In America, having a mental illness has become a crime. One in four fatal police shootings involves a person with mental illness. The country’s three largest providers of...
March 12 7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Straub Hall, 156

In America, having a mental illness has become a crime. One in four fatal police shootings involves a person with mental illness. The country’s three largest providers of mental health are not hospitals, but jails. As many as half the people in US jails and prisons have a psychiatric problem.

In her book, Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness, journalist Alisa Roth goes deep inside the criminal justice system to reveal how America’s tough-on-crime policies have transformed it into a warehouse for people with mental illness, one where prisoners are denied proper treatment, abused, and punished in ways that make them sicker. She introduces us to ordinary people whose untreated mental illnesses drive them repeatedly into the justice system—and in some cases, to their deaths.

As a 2014-2015 Soros Justice Fellow, Roth spent a year investigating the growing role of jails and prisons as our de facto mental healthcare system. She has visited the country’s three largest psychiatric care providers, Rikers Island in New York City, the Cook County Jail in Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Jail in LA, and her research has included dozens of interviews with prisoners and their families, psychiatrists, lawyers, wardens, corrections officers and others.

May 21
Danielle Allen7:30 p.m.

Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, and Director of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, is widely known for her work on...
May 21 7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.
Oregon Humanities Center

Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, and Director of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, is widely known for her work on justice and citizenship in both ancient Athens and modern America.